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The Blue Lacy

Description

The coat of the Blue Lacy is smooth, tight, sleek, exceptionally clean in appearance. The origin of the unusual slate blue coat and nose is a genetic rarity. All Lacys have minimal to full white markings on their brisket and most of the time on paw or paws. The light gun-metal gray to almost black Lacys are classified in color as blue. The red, yellow to cream Lacys are classified in color as red. The tri-colored Lacys are blue with red markings over their eyes, on muzzle, under tail, and down the legs. They are classified in color as tri. Both the red and tri-colored Lacys hold the name Blue Lacy due to the blue-color gene they possess. All Blue Lacy’s eyes are very bright and distinctive orange to yellow in color.

Origin

Having nothing to do with the characteristics the dogs have, the name is that of the Lacy Family. Arriving from Kentucky by covered wagon in 1858 the "Lacy Brothers" (Frank, George, Ewin, and Harry Lacy) settled in the granite hills near Marble Falls, Texas. As true a pioneer as the men you see in history books, the Blue Lacy Game Dog has filled the needs of Colonial Americans for well over a century on ranches in the Southwestern US. When the three-wheeled horse hit the trail it brought this unique breed unsuccessfully close to extinction. While the need for its instinctive herding abilities were diminishing the need for its abilities to bay the fiercest of hog, pick up the trail of any game animal or find a wounded animal on the slightest of blood trails was on the rise in the commercial hunting industry. Blue Lacy owners claim they are the perfect all-around dog, knowing where to be at just the right time. The Lacy family history notes the breed to be the result of Greyhound/ scenthound/ coyote cross with the emphasis on the herding/ droving characteristics. Many people have their theory on the scenthound used. Some believe it was a Red Bone Hound, or Italian Gray Hound, others believe it was a July Hound. What ever the Hound in the combination is the cross worked. The Lacy brothers established this breed under the guidelines it takes to develop a recognized breed. Blue Lacys are the official state dog of Texas.

Temperament

Lacy's are easy to handle, spectacular workers and pets that are great with children. This breed is very sensitive to yelling. It responds better to stern or soft commands. They are energetic and dedicated dogs, capable of handling the meanest longhorn cattle or most jittery of hens, taking the job instinctively, requiring no training. They are known to replace the work of a cowboy by five times. This breed is also used for hog hunting, finding wounded deer, and treeing game. Suitable for a watch dog and both herding and droving tasks.

Height/Weight

Height: 18-25 inches
Weight: 25-50 pounds

Life Expectancy

Up to 16 years.
 

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I have one. He's what they call red but it is really bright yellow. I'll see if I can download a Photobucket picture and post it here. I believe I have a few. I am planning to get a blue or blue/tan female in the next year or so, hopefully. Nice thing about the breed is that they don't get big. 55 lbs is pretty big for a male. Females are much smaller 40 lbs or less but, Lord, can those females work a cattle/hog! I've seen a full grown female at 28 lbs turn a very mean bull and send him packing to the herd. The pups want to work livestock as early as 4 or 5 months old. Not recommended, ofc. The registery (there's only one) is run by the member of the Lacy family where the lacys orginated from. They can be very strict about selling puppies...sometimes they don't follow the registery guidelines, IMHO, but are good people regardless.

Their website is: www.lacydog.com
 

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I'm going to attempt to download some pictures from Photobucket. Bear with me.



The one above is of my blue lacy, Moonshine. I will download the other one of him checking out my newborn son, Walker, who is now 4 months old.



The scar you see on his left hind leg is from a boar cutting him rather severely when he was young. He then got hit by a car 6 months later chasing a squirrel shattering his front leg completely in 4 places costing me $1,400 to get it fixed. He had to have the steel pins on his front leg longer than planned (5 months). Now the vet has recommended that he be retired so at present time he's sort of semi-retired. His sole duty is to watch over Walker which he does really good at!
 

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Other pictures are of friend's lacys that I've downloaded from my Photobucket account.

This picture is a classic! The guy is about to work cattle and has his cherished lacy dogs ready to work.



This picture below is a color that is seen in the blue lacy but is the least common color.



Working hogs below:







4 or 5 month old puppies working a small hog:



Blackmouth cur working a cow while a blue lacy watches:



Another cattle herding pic, this time of a blue lacy who is the father of my dog working a bull:



Lacys treeing a coon in a cage during a training session:

 

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Forgot to add that while those pictures tend to show them at work..they're good with people and kids. They also make very good watchdogs once they're past 2 years old and past the age where they need to exercise all the time. They do not like strange dogs and have to be introduced on neutral ground then they'll be ok with that strange dog. VERY easy to housebreak! Males do not mark in the house as a general rule. Main key is to catch them doing it..ONCE...then they won't do it again. However, Moonshine's worst trait was he tended to chew up socks when he was a pup then he quit after being chewed out then transferred it to cardboard stuff...and he's now starting to leave them alone. Lol. :p

One more detail. It is my opinion that they tolerate heat much better than the other cur dog breeds that I've had: catahoula, blackmouth curs, and mixes. Maybe it has to do with their suspected coyote or greyhound blood...also it's speculated that they may have July hound in them but doubtful at this time. They're the breed most used by government trappers nowdays. That means they have a good nose.
 
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