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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few Dexter cattle, I purchased a 4 year old cow from a breeder and he felt that she was bred by his herd sire, she calved in March and the breeder left her with the bull until June. She has not shown any signs of going into heat until now, I saw the steer try to mount her and then she tried to mount the steer. Is this a definite sign that she is not pregnant?

Thank you all Very much!
 

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No, not a definite sign. Unless she actually stands for him, they could be just messing around. Cows do that. But it could be an indication that she is coming into heat.

If the bull was taken away in June, she could be due from mid January to mid March. If you are concerned, get a vet out and have her palpated. Otherwise, watch closely for signs in the next day or so, or just wait and see.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much for responding, I can use any advice I can get. I was searching for photos of pregnant dexters but couldn't find any. I am curious to know if it is very visible to the naked eye when they come closer to their due date. Her bag still looks the same as it did when she arrived at our farm, but I believe that would be because her son is still nursing. What are the biggest signs that she will be delivering soon?
 

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You can do a pregnancy test through Biotracking for less than the cost of a vet visit. If she is in fact pregnant, you need to dry her off ASAP!
 

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It isn't harmful to the cow to have a calf nursing during pregnancy. However, a cow needs at least 60 days dry before she calves again. Beef cows usually have 90-120 days dry. This allows them to completely dry off and then produce colostrum for the next calf. If you don't dry her off, she may not have the colostrum that her next calf needs, and she may end up not having enough milk for the new calf either.

You need to wean her current calf as soon as possible, as she could very well calve within the next month. And if she is bred, and wasn't with a bull after sometime in June, she will calve before mid April!!!

There is no reason for this cow to still be nursing her spring calf. He is 9-10 months old now, most calves are weaned off the cow by 8 months. He is more than old enough to go to a diet of hay and grain (if you want to feed it)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you again for the responses. A little more background on our Dexter situation. The steer who is still nursing really is practically self-weaned already(in my opinion). We only occasionally see him nursing these days. Other than that, he is on a hay/mineral diet just like the others. So in other words, he is primarily eating hay and has a treat occasionally. We have four dexters and currently aren't milking any and are just raising the steer for beef. We didn't necessarily have intentions of milking her for our own use right after she gives birth either. Just kind of enjoying them for now. Are they really that different from humans as far as the whole nursing while pregnant thing goes? I know first hand that a woman can nurse a child while pregnant with another, give birth and have no problem nursing both. In a more "wild" setting, I would imagine there wouldn't be any interference with the pregnant cow and nursing steer. Is it only necessary to wean if you are using them as dairy cows? Again, thank you all for the information.
 

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From what I understand, if you don't wean him off, she may not have enough colostrum for the new calf and the calf could die.

Are they milking Dexters? Why on earth would you not take advantage of the milk for your home use? Wow! :)
 
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