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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm hoping for a color genetics expanation that I can understand.

How can I break the white color pattern I keep seeing along the back & belly of my kids? Two does in particular (half sisters) keep giving me this pattern: dark head & front legs, dark or white streaked back legs, rear end, but mostly white from the shoulder to the tail & down the belly & sometimes ghost spots develop after a year of age under this white . One doe is solid with a belly band & ring on her rear leg, the other is like the patter described above. Sometimes the kids have a spot somehere within the white, so I don't think genetically they are all white.

The grandchildren of these does we get (3 years of data collection) about 1/2 with just the belly band, the other half we get the whiting we are trying to break.

Is it true the grandkids will resemble the grandparents? Will the next generation have the white, too, or will it skip to mostly colored?

btw we've used 3 unrelated bucks in 3 years of breeding, & these bucks are mostly colored. Can I break this cycle with these does, or am I better off just keeping the offspring & continuously breeding to solid or patterned bucks?
Don't get me wrong, I'm getting nice looking kids, but I'm looking for more diversity here.

I have a hard time with understanding the color genetic resources I've found online....
HF
 

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The asian/african breeds of Nubians and Boers, white is dominant. If you were to breed to correctly color patterned boers, your white in a few generation would go back where it is supossed to go, on the body. But to get rid of it completely, you would have to cull for it. Not keeping any white, breeding to bucks with no white, it's how you cull for anything in goats, be it bad feet, bad udder or color.

You don't want to be breeding to 3 different unrelated bucks in 3 years. You can't get any consistancy, know what anybody is truly throwing, and you end up with heinz 57 bloodline that you really can't know anything about. Is it your does throwing the white? The buck? Who knows?

A consistant linebred herd is the only way to manipulate the bloodline, no matter what bloodline you are talking about. So if you find a buck who throws alot of kids who don't have the problem you feel is a cull in your herd...then use his best son born...the following year use another son...either out of the son you kept or the previous buck #1...out of an unrelated does, who also shows the colorings you want. But you have to cull out the white kids, or just use them for your milk or meat, but not part of the core of your breeding program. Keeping a small group, amongst the goats you have to keep to make a profit, is the easiest way to do this, then as you get corrected colored excellent conformation, good milk and/or meat producers, than start replacing your white does with your colored kids you have engineered to carry less and less white. Vicki
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Vickie. We're doing that, but in a round-about-way as we grow our herd. I studied pedigrees on these two & really thought I'd get something with less white (of course based on the granparent theory).
HF
 

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I don't know what breeds you are working with but this might help you for NDs:

http://members.cox.net/foxcroft/genetics.htm

Various genes control how much of each type of pigment is made and where it is deposited. White areas on an animal are areas where no melanin is being produced. There aren't always just two possible alleles of a gene. Sometimes there are many. This is the case with the main color loci in goats.
It goes on to talk about the differences between spotting genes and overall white genes, especially with regard to the agouti locus.
 
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