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Just got a steal on an antique brass bed that needs major cleaning but minimal repair. What is the best product to use for cleaning this bed??? commercial product or home made cleaner?? Any tool to make it easier...like a sander with buffing pad or something?? Want to make my $125 purchase sparkle...already picturing my homemade quilts piled high and won't mind the elbow grease necessary to do this job. Thanks all...mutti who can't remember her password!
 

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not sure about brass, but i found out by accident that brown bean juice works wonders on copper.
got some out of the pot one time and dropped it on the tea kettle, then found it about 30 minutes later, wiped it off and was like brand new shiny so i put some more on it and left it for awhile. whole thing looked like it had just been made with no more effort than just wiping it off. i found out later that the second days juice works alot better when it gets just a little pasty. might be worth a try. if it dont work you''ll still have a good pot of beans :)
 

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If your bean juice doesn't do it. Brasso is the way to go, once it hazes you can get a buffer pad for your drill and buff it out. But, you'll need to seal it with a clear spray, or it's an on going thing.
 

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got this trick from a guy who sells antiques. Get a can of WD40, the same stuff you spray on things to lubricate them. Spray the bed and wipe with a coarse cloth, wool works best but terrycloth towels will also work with a little more effort. the tarnish will wipe right off. do just a section at a time and work where there is plenty of ventilation because that stuff will make you sick if you breath it.
 

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kyhippie said:
got this trick from a guy who sells antiques. Get a can of WD40, the same stuff you spray on things to lubricate them. Spray the bed and wipe with a coarse cloth, wool works best but terrycloth towels will also work with a little more effort. the tarnish will wipe right off. do just a section at a time and work where there is plenty of ventilation because that stuff will make you sick if you breath it.
WD40 also works to get roofing tar off your hands.
 
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