Bowhunting?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by moonwolf, Mar 6, 2005.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Questions for bowhunters on the board, as I am interested for this undertaking in the fall:

    1. How did you get into bowhunting?

    2. What type of bow do you use, and for what game?

    3. What are the advantages or disadvantages of using a crossbow for game hunting?

    4. Do you bowhunt in the spring, such as gobblers or fish?

    5. What success rate are you having with bowhunting?

    thanks,
    Rich
     
  2. Oregonsparkie

    Oregonsparkie Well-Known Member

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    I have been bowhunting for about 8 years. It is harder to hunt with a bow if you are use to rifle hunting. With a bow you generally shoot at about 35 yeards or less, which means you have to learn to call them in or sneek up on them.
    I have shot with several manufacturers of bows... Darton, Jennings, Bear, Hoyt. Here in Oregon you can not hunt with a crossbow so I can not answer that question. I really like hunting with a bow rather than a rifle but many prefer a rifle.

    I generally just hunt for deer and elk but I wouldnt mind trying turkey. I started bow hunting because it was easier to get a tag for the animals I wanted to hunt. I think the success rate is probably lower with a bow than a rifle though but it takes more skill too.
     

  3. big rockpile

    big rockpile If I need a Shelter

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    I started out hunting with a Recurve back in the '60's,bought a Compound in mid '70's,went back to Recurve.I've been hunting with Crossbow the last 3 seasons.

    When I hunted with Recurve I hunted everything Small Game,Bow Fished,and Deer hunted.Since I've started hunting with a Crossbow I just hunt Deer,because it distroys Arrows and they are too high Dollar.

    Crossbows are High Dollar,heavy,hard to Cock,and I've never gotten a second shot.Advantage they are already drawn.

    I usualy get a couple Deer with a Bow in a season.

    big rockpile
     
  4. RedneckWoman

    RedneckWoman Well-Known Member

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    1. How did you get into bowhunting?
    Been bow hunting for about five years now. Decided to give it a try after hearing everyone talk about how much fun it was and more of a challenge than rifle hunting. Brother let me try his out and taught me what he knew and I went from there.

    2. What type of bow do you use, and for what game?
    PSE Vengeance NRG One-Cam Bow (compound). Deer.

    3. What are the advantages or disadvantages of using a crossbow for game hunting?
    Illegal here so I can't answer that one.

    4. Do you bowhunt in the spring, such as gobblers or fish?
    No.

    5. What success rate are you having with bowhunting?
    I get an average of two deer a year with a bow. Hard to get a clean, close shot around here so I definetly have better luck with rifle.
     
  5. stonefly71

    stonefly71 Well-Known Member

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    Started hunting when I was 9 i'm 33 now have been shooting bow since I was in boy scouts and have hunted with them ever since. I use a cross bow now since I have a torn disc and many other back problems that won't allowe me to hold a bow at full draw. But I'm planning on making a homemade bow this spring mainly just to do it. I hunt with a Horton crossbow that is 150 lbs pull. I've shot all types of small animals with a bow along with carp and frogs. I've also hunted with a blow gug but thats a differnt story. Later Matt p.s advantages of crossbow you only have to pull it back once vs. using compound bow where if your game moves and you don't get the shot off you have to let the bow back down and then pull it back when another shot comes up. But if I was to shot a compound or recurve againg I just use my fingers as to a mech. release. And on one bow I don't use sights except my eye and the nock. But I do use pin sights on my Hoyt and crossbow. Later Matt
     
  6. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    I don't understand why anyone would want a compound but I remember when they first became popular and it seemed like everyone who couldn't hit the ground with an arrow out of a recurve or longbow went straight for a compound, aluminium arrows, and sights.
     
  7. Highground

    Highground Well-Known Member

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  8. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I use to bowhunt but do to a shoulder injury I can't anymore. I did enjoy it. I've been told I could get a doctors note and hunt with a crossbow. For some reason many archery enthusiasts look down on crossbows but I never quite understood why. Archers use compound bows, mechanical releases, sights and all manner of scents, camo, treestands, blinds and other things but look down on crossbows. I never could understand that.


    It is an excellent sport to get into. You learn patience for one thing. That was one of the best things I got from bowhunting was patience. The self discipline from practicing and sitting hours on a stand were all good for the mind.

    I hunted deer and turkey. I really enjoyed bowfishing. Shooting carp, dogfish and gar was great fun. I liked that about as much as deer and turkey hunting in some ways.

    I don't care for elitist attitude I found in some bowhunters. They seemed to look down on all other hunters. Because they hunted with homemade recurves and flint arrowheads they were "real" hunters and others weren't. They even looked down on compound bow hunters. Kinda how trout fishermen look down on bass fishermen and how bass fishermen look down on catfishermen. I never cared for that kind of clique-ish snobbery.
    Most bowhunters are great guys (and gals) and are always looking to help someone else get started in the sport.
     
  9. jenzden

    jenzden Active Member

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    I got started in bowhunting about 4 years ago. I actually taught myself. My main reasons for bowhunting are that usually there is no one else in the woods, it is more quiet, it is awesome when you have animals walk right up to you (I use ground blinds)... I have learned so much more about game animals because it takes a lot of patience sitting there waiting for something to happen. You have to learn more about the animals because they don't usually just walk right up to you. You have to learn their habits and you have to learn scent & wind direction. Turkeys are much harder - I haven't used a bow for them yet but I am thinking about it. As for success - I've shot a deer in my 2nd, 3rd & 4th years. I've heard of others not getting their first deer for several years so it just depends on the person and their luck or skills.
    By the way, I am a woman hunter using a compound bow (53 lb. pull). I'm going to kick up the weight a few lbs. this year.
     
  10. shelljo

    shelljo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    This past winter was my first time bow hunting. DH has bowhunted for 20 years. I've had a lot of success rifle hunting and wanted to try a bow. While I don't like getting up at 4:30 a.m. to hunt (we travel 60 miles to hunt), I loved the experience. Once I was in my tree, watching the animals, well, that's enough for me! I didn't believe that deer could walk up and you'd never see them. I watched mating behavior, I watched deer interact with each other, heard them grunt, etc. Had a skunk play under my tree. Had 30-40 head of cattle walk under my tree too. Liked being there and the animals not knowing, or caring that I was there. DH had 2 bobcat cubs play under his tree one morning. You just don't experience that rifle hunting. And I like using the rifle.

    I shoot a compound bow, but teach 4-Hers with a recurve. Dont know the brand, as it's not my bow. Wasn't investing since we didn't know if I'd like it or not. Now am searching for a bow of my own. Pulled 50 pounds.

    I've only hunted for deer. KS has very limited elk, and I have chosen to leave the turkeys to DH and my son. But, this year, DH wants me to try turkey hunting. We'll see--but with a shotgun, not bow, although I'd like to give that a try as well.

    I did get a shot, but missed. I'm still learning how to judge the distances and which sight pin to use for which distance. My arrow went right under that 4pt buck's belly. He didn't know what had happened, but didn't stick around long enough for me to get another shot off.

    We only hunted morning hours, but I'm dying to try an all day hunt...now to find someone to watch the kids.
     
  11. I started shooting a little 20# fiberglass recurve when I was 6 years old. Never did learn to hunt with it. When I was 18 I took up deer bowhunting with a 40 # fiberglass recurve and still never learned to hunt with it. I blamed my failure on the bow and figured if I get me a compound like everyone else is using my luck would change. I got a compound and for the next 5 years I still didn't couldn't kill a deer. But then my luck started changing, I learned a few techniques such as being patient, calm when I see a deer, and learn how to use the woods to my advantage. I then started killing deer with my compound. Sometimes filling all my deer tags within the first few weeks of the new season. These techniques also helped in muzzleloading and conventional rifle hunting. After a few years I got to realizing that I really don't need all these high tech hunting accessories cause all the deer I kill are with in about 18 paces from me. So since then I have gone back to recurves and am now the proud owner of my own selfmade bow made out of a Mulberry tree. Am learning to make my own arrows, strings, quivers, buckskins, everything the old indian ways. Seems to be a whole new fun way of hunting.

    I also hunt various small game with my homemade stick bow. Rabbits, squirrels and fish. My biggest fish so far is a 60-65 pound spoonbill catfish.

    Tips: 1.Practice all the time. 2. You don't have to be a he-man, a 40-50 pound bow will take down a buffalo or moose. 3. If you can, practice with a big bow weight but hunt with a smaller bow weight. Exampe, practice with a 50 pound recurve but hunt with a 40 pounder. You will be amazed how accurate you will be with a smaller bow.
     
  12. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

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    I was born on the day that Howard Hill became the first white man to take an elephant with a bow and arrow. I have loved archery since I can remember and can still remember the early "elitist" attitudes of folks who shot self-bows when talking to those who shot the "modern" fiberglass laminated bows.

    When I was a teenager my Great-Grandfather, then in his 80's, taught me to make a hickory self-bow and sourwood arrows as he had been taught by his Indian mother and had re-enforced by his Indian wife, as they had been taught by their parents and Grandparents. I even learned to make flint and glass arrowheads and to split my own feathers. I made a few of them but really liked my fiberglass and maple laminated recurve and white cedar arrows; I still do.

    In the early '70's a new "elitist" group emerged, they shot the then quite expensive sighted compounds with aluminum arrows, and looked down with great distain on those of us still shooting the antiquated recurves and longbows with wooden arrows.

    In the late '80's and early '90's we came full circle with some folks ditching their compounds for self-bows and again, looking down on anyone not shooting "traditional" archery. I’ve watched this thing come full circle, and I can make my own bows, strings, arrows, and points from what I find in the woods, and can kill game with these same bows and arrows, but I prefer my old laminated recurves and white cedar arrows.

    Once an uncle of mine who could never hit anything smaller than Mother Earth with a “traditional” style bow wanted to show me why he shot a sighted compound. He paced off 40 steps from his target and put 3 arrows in a 2” circle, then looked at me, grinned, and said, “Now you give it a try.” I told him that 40 yards was out of range for me unless I was just stump shooting, and he said, “That’s why I shoot a compound with sights.” Well, not to be outdone entirely, I picked up a nearby soda-pop can and asked him to throw it in the air. He did and I stuck an arrow in it, then I said, “Now you give it a try.” He said that he couldn’t line up his sights on a target moving that fast, and I said, “That’s why I don’t shoot a compound with sights.” I should have added that they also weigh a ton and I’m too lazy to carry one around.

    No, I don’t think I’m any more or any less than someone carrying a different kind of bow, and I have been on both ends of the snobbery and could care less what anyone else shoots, and a lot of the folks acting snobberish today about shooting “traditional” archery equipment are the same folks who were giving me perdition 30 years ago over not changing to a sighted compound.
     
  13. Quint

    Quint Well-Known Member

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    I hear ya Haggis. Somebody is always looking down at somebody else. I remember when I was shooting at a local archery course and some guy was giving me grief about shooting with pin sights. Jeez why did it matter?

    I also had an experience at a gun range once that I'll never forget. I was 17 and had scrimped and saved until I could afford to buy my dream rifle. An HK-91 with a Leupold scope. I couldn't have been prouder of that rifle. I probably took years off it's service life just by assembling and disassembling it to keep it clean. Cleaned the thing every day I think. I had a nice case for it and I hand cut the foam in the case to perfectly fit the rifle, the magazines and supplies. It shot well too. I took many deer with it. I was at a range with another guy and we were doing some target shooting. A group of "old farts" were there and began making snide remarks about my rifle. This went on for a while and they finally came over and started berating me for my rifle. They said ignorant crap like " what are you doing with a machine gun boy? you could kill a lot of people with that rifle. You gonna go shoot up a Macdonald's with that? You in a militia boy? I'm gonna call the sheriff and the fbi on you for having a machine gun. That gun is for killing and that is it. If you shot a deer with that there wouldn't be anything left" All sorts of vile crap. The thing is they were shooting winchesters, Remingtons and high dollar wheatherby rifles and my groups were just as tight as theirs if not more so.

    As a 17 year old kid it really upset me. These were the kind of guys I looked up to and was taught to respect. They had no business treating a kid like that. Plus they were incredibly ignorant about what they were talking about. I've never been back to a gun club since.