Bowhunting Questions again.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by moonwolf, Sep 18, 2005.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I'm considering this year to try and take up bowhunting for deer. I am pretty sure I can get to range of 50 yds., maybe less on the ones which frequent around here.

    From what I am gathering is that a compound bow is what I will want.

    Does anyone have suggestions for some particular models that would be best for price vs. performance, ease of learning to use with practice, and enough deer killing power....also best arrows to get both for practice and also for the hunt.

    Type of terrain is mixed brush/forest and well used trails and resting places I see deer, with open clearings. I don't think I'll use a tree stand, and probably more of a stlak or stand (and wait) method.
     
  2. mightybooboo

    mightybooboo Well-Known Member

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    Hope this thread takes off.Mrs. wants a bow setup for Christmas.And a shotgun.BTW,should I be concerned about this? :eek:

    BooBoo
     

  3. rzrubek

    rzrubek Flying Z

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    That would depend on how many nights you have spent in the Doghouse!![​IMG]
     
  4. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

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    i have a pse typhoon II its a 33 or 34 inch from limb to limb if i remmember right. i like it alot. my father had given me his old pse bow to teach myself how to shoot a bow. surprizingly i had a 6 inch groop at 30 yards first quiver of arrow's iever shot! anyways was shootin it for sevral hours at the local archery range and then i noticed that it had cracks in the cam mounts on both ends so i immediatly never drew it back again

    i checked with PSE down in tucson az. they said to ship it to them they whould pop on some new limbs for me and send it back up for free. so i sent it and i got a call few days later they scowered there inventory and couldnt find any limbs to fit it anymore. so they offered me a pse typhoon 2 as a replacement to the bow its a 3 or 400 dollar bow for free! i asked them if they could send me my old bow back for sentimental value and they did

    few weeks later i got my new bow and my old bow took the quivver and stabilizer and sights from my old bow and put em on my new bow and have been havin a blast..

    PSE has given me the absolute best costomerservice i have ever experienced. and i am havin fun with my new bow.
     
  5. roadrash

    roadrash Well-Known Member

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    Fifty yards? :nono:You need to set yourself up to get closer than that.Most of my shots are under twenty yards,probably half are less than ten.I use an old bear Kodiak magnum recurve and aluminum arrows.I hunted with a compound for fifteen years,but got sick of all the gadgetry!Regardless of what you buy for a bow keep it simple and quiet.Just as important as accurate shooting is accurate yardage estimation if useing sights!If you are shooting with your fingers buy a longer bow,If useing a release the shorter bows are nice in a treestand.Do not buy a bow with too much draw poundage,You will develop alot of bad habits in a hurry.
    Buy a portable treestand if possible,you will see many more deer ,your odds of shooting a nice buck from the ground are pretty slim!I swear most bowhunters today are equipment junkies more than hunters and the hunting is just something to justify the money spent on the latest and greatest equipment.(be a hunter)Myself I like equipment also ,But I get more of a charge out of tieing a perfect flemish twist bowstring with a cool color combo, than bolting on the most expensive fibre optic bowsight the local pro shop had in stock!
    I guess the point I am trying to make is ,What bow you buy matters little as long as it fits you.What matters is that you wait for a good shot,can shoot under pressure,have sharp broadheads,have a quiet bow,wear rubber boots and keep your scent down.(you do not need a $300 scentlock suit)I wash my clothes in baking soda every few days and hang them in the barn!
    I would not worry about becomeing a target archer that can shoot bullseyes at fifty yards under Ideal conditions,I would concentrate on learning to never miss at twenty yards (in every position except standing on my head)The most important thing is to have fun and not take it too seriously,you will have shots you miss when you could have thrown a rock at the animal and hit it.Thats what makes it fun and challenging. :buds:
     
  6. fordy

    fordy Well-Known Member

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    .................Cross bow............>>>fordy.. :)
     
  7. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

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    btw i have taken the sights off my bow bout the same day i put them on i shoot by feel. and my old bow i spoke of ... i am saving it to make a recurve with. i figure hey compound bows have realy nice risers. that lets you shoot through the center of the riser.. why not build some recurve limbs and have a nice shooting bow.

    i think one of my happyest days was when i went to the local feed store and bought an archery bale.. its compressed ceder shavings its rated to last 8 years at a shooting range and then it can be turned around and shot another bit. so it should be a nice long long time target for a single shooter like myself. built myself a skid platform with a roof for it. had alot of fun that day :)
     
  8. roadrash

    roadrash Well-Known Member

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    Good luck with that!
     
  9. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

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    any of you guys have experience building laminet recurves
     
  10. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

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    also do you guys think there is ANY possible save way to possibly epoxy the cracks so the bow is shootable again. it has a hairline crack in each tip of the bow where the cams meet
    i have not noticed the crack expanding at all when knocked.
     
  11. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Why recurve?
    Why Compoound?
    Why not crossbow?

    splain>>>>>>>

    need more dope on arrows too.
     
  12. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

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    why use cross bow when you can use a gun. main reason people like bow is it takes alot of skill.
     
  13. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I wanted to use a bow to hunt as an alternative to the 'bang' and bullets of a rifle or slug of a shotgun. I'll have to evolve with the skill.
    Closeness to deer shouldn't be a problem in areas I know. If one is 50 yards, I'de like to develop enough skill to kill it, but I realize a much closer shot is desireable. Don't care for tree stands as I'll prefer a blind.
     
  14. Imaexpat2

    Imaexpat2 Member

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    I made that switch a few years ago and havent looked back since. Dont get me wrong I love my guns and shoot them all the time and still hunt with them but find Im using my bow more and more each year.

    Since Im not much of a traditionalist and got mine primarily for hunting, I chose a Compound Bow and would recommend it as a first bow too. I got a Hoyt Intruder 70# draw. Not an expensive bow by any means but works great and made a good entry level bow for me without breaking the bank.

    If your really interested then check out a bow shop and archery club, get smart and then pick your tool of choice, and go for it! I seriously doubt that you will regret it!!!!! For me it started as a curiosity and its now somewhat of an addiction...
     
  15. roadrash

    roadrash Well-Known Member

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    Crossbows are not legal to hunt big game in most areas during archery season!The dope on arrows is they need to be matched for spine to your bow poundage and draw length!Best to have a pro shop help you out with that when first starting out!They are available in differant materials,Wood,Aluminum,fiberglass,carbon(all the rage)are the fastest,they are also the most expensive at about a hundred bucks a dozen!What you choose will Depend on your setup and budget.
    If you buy a state of the art compound with all the gadgets I would use carbon with mechanical broadheads.Mechanical broadheads have blades that fold out when strikeing there target when in flight they fly like a field point with the blades folded up(this prevents wind planeing and allows the use of smaller fletching for more speed)Aluminum arrows are my choice as they are durable and economical I can buy a dozen raw shafts for about thirty bucks and fletch them myself for next to nothing(fletching jig required).I choose to use fixed blade zwickey eskimo broadheads as they are durable and can withstand many misses,plus I can get them so sharp they will cut you just looking at them.I have been useing the same dozen broadheads for the last ten years.They cost me about $25 for the dozen.Mechanical broadheads will cost you that for three and one miss and there garbage!Plus mechanical broadheads are not that sharp IMHO and there is no good way to sharpen them, after practiceing with them you must buy expensive replacement blades!There are also good fixed blade broadheads that have replaceable blades that are a good choice.Whatever broadhead you choose make sure you practice with them to make sure they impact where you think they will,and that they do not windplane.If they windplane you probably need larger fletching.I have found over the years that with any fixed blade broadhead I need five inch left hand helical fletching.This imparts a spiral on the arrow like rifleing does on a bullet and prevents wind planeing.Just because you have 125 grain field points and 125grain broadheads that they will impact in the same place practice with your broadheads.I have one lucky broadhead that I have killed eight deer with ,its always number one in my bowquiver!Thats the thing I like about my broadheads (they are indestructible)It would be impossible to explain everything to you That I have learned the hard way without spending alot of time with you.But as I think of any key things I will repost!
     
  16. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    thanks Imaexpat2.
    That's what I am thinking that once I get into bowhunting gradually I'll enjoy it more than firearms. My use would be hunting to get the game. One that I am going to take a look at is a Fred Bear compound in the $200 range. There is a local expert and an archery range I can access for further training or info.

    Roadrash and Valdure,
    Thanks for your input. My intuition is to not get a crossbow, though it's an option over a bulleted firearm. I'm not that concerned about going out for an early season with the bow as it's just to warm to hang a harvest deer until well into October around here for the best meat outcome.
     
  17. Bootlegger0173

    Bootlegger0173 Active Member

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    Around here the Mathews bows are the rage, and understandably so, if you have an unlimited ammount of money to spend. Me, I shoot instintively with a laminated PSE Blackhawk recurve. 20-30 yards would be a more realistic limit. Less, if from a tree. Graphite arrows are the best, but way to pricey for me. I use Easton aluminum shafts and Muzzy broadheads. If you have never tried one, consider a Bug Tamer jacket. Can wear a T-shirt in the woods and never get a skeeter bite. Real nice. and even has a hood. I'll never buy a compound again, but still, I prefer a longbow to a recurve. Just my 2 cents.
     
  18. Valduare

    Valduare Well-Known Member

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    i want to use my compound bow riser to make a laminated recurve so i can shoot through the riser instead of around the riser

    any of you guys make laminet bows before
     
  19. roadrash

    roadrash Well-Known Member

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    Valduare,
    It would not be practical,sounds like someone dry fired that compound with the split limbs!The amount of time and money you invested in materials for fixtures and several sets of limbs due to trial and error would buy you a couple top of the line recurves.I doubt a compound riser would work,even if it did it would be heavy and cold in the hand.These are two of the appealing traits common to traditional archery gear.You would have to make several sets of limbs before you reached the desired draw weight,you would also have to get the tiller just right.Most custom bowyers spend years learning there craft,and I am sure they fill many dumpsters with there mistakes!JMHO :)