Bovine escape artists!

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by willow_girl, Oct 29, 2004.

  1. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    Are some of your cattle more prone to getting out than others?

    My white cow, Teeny, is a real escape artist! I swear she passes like smoke through a keyhole ...

    :rolleyes:

    She was across the road grazing when I went out to chore tonight. The fence was off, but it wasn't down ... I couldn't for the life of me figure out how she got out!

    :confused:

    Will have to try to catch her in the act tomorrow, I guess ...

    Ah well, at least she's easy to catch ... I just walked over and scolded her, and she made a beeline for home, bucking and jumping all the way!

    :haha:

    Teeny, planning her next escape:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. OD

    OD Well-Known Member

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    That brings back memories!!! My daddy had Holsteins when I was growing up, & I spent many hours chasing them back home. There was one that would walk up to the fence & stick her horns into it & sling her head around & walk right through whatever was left of it. I don't recall ever having to get the Jerseys in though.
    One of the happiest days of my life was the day he put the electric fence up.
     

  3. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    I'll bet! :haha:

    I can see Teeny doing that if she had horns ... guess I should be glad she doesn't!

    I do have a gate in the barn that is a chain link panel to an old dog kennel. The chain link was separating away from the conduit at the bottom. Teeny figured out that she could put her head in the gap and puuuuuuuuuush her way through the opening, which I swear was not more than 2 feet square! :eek:

    If I hadn't seen her do this with my own eyes, I would have sworn it was impossible ... :no:
     
  4. genebo

    genebo Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Yesterday I left the gate open for a short time (old age memory). Five cows made a dash for freedom. Some stopped to eat the pear trees but two were running down the lane. I quickly grabbed some feed and rattled it in the bunker. They stopped and turned back, looking at me. One of the cows immediately came back through the gate. Two others came slowly back, with my mongrel dog snapping at their heels. As soon as they were in, that dog went and got the other two that were pretty far away. The dog had not been trained, she just knew that they didn't belong outside the fence.

    I've fed the cattle a little bit of sweet feed every day for training purposes. It makes them more approachable and I can then train them by offering treats they have learned to like. It really paid off in this case. The sound of the feed in the bunker helped bring them all back in within minutes.

    Hooray for sweet feed and a smart dog. Boo! on getting old and forgetful.

    Genebo
    Paradise Farm
     
  5. willow_girl

    willow_girl Very Dairy

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    And let's not leave out -- THE HERD INSTINCT! :D

    All my critters will follow a grain bucket to the ends of the Earth ... :rolleyes:

    The problem with leading Teeny this way is that if she can get her nose in the bucket, she will nail it to the ground ... and good luck getting it away from her! :no:

    About the only thing to do is show her the grain and take off running toward the barn -- which I can't do very well at the moment with this pinched nerve or whatever that is messing up my leg! My husband had to fetch her back this way a couple days ago ... it was really a treat to see a 50-year-old man running full-tilt with a 1,000-pound Holstein bearing down on him! He said afterwards that he was afraid if he tripped, she'd have run right over the top of him, and I don't doubt it! :haha:

    Do you suppose it's too late to teach her some manners? She's only a bit over 2, after all. Hmmm.
     
  6. Mel-

    Mel- Well-Known Member

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    my brothers two heifer angus have been in the pasture next to me for about a year now ( he moved into town).

    the biggest, bulliest one has gotten out 3 times, the smaller more timid one never follows her.

    I've never seen her actually get out but there are no gates at all, just hot wire but somehow she just walks right through it when it shorts out but there is never any torn down areas or any other way of telling where she walked through!

    at least the last time was in warm weather, I was standing in 15 degree weather last winter in the middle of our blacktop road, pitch black outside no moon, trying to prevent cars from hitting a pitch black cow! (and cussing my brothers name).

    these heifers were bound for slaughter this fall when the pasture gives out but may get a reprieve. my sister and her husband who live on the other side of the pasture would like to buy them and breed them if they can afford it.

    mel-
     
  7. Christina R.

    Christina R. Well-Known Member

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    I'm always thinking of the what ifs in spite of the fact that today usually has enough grief of its own... When we sell Corabelle's heifer...is there a greater chance she is going to try to break down the fence to try to find her? Sh'es never been interested in jumping out or breaking out. I'm hoping all of you answer, no sweat, she'll just bawl her head off for a few days.
     
  8. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In days of old when electric fences were either battery, or non existant, and buying new fence wire would have put us into bankruptcy, they had YOKES to put on breachy cows. Nearly always when the cows got out, it was the same cow that opened the way for it to happen. We had a yoke that went around the cows neck. It was made in two pieces that were shaped like the letter Y. One half was inverted on top the neck and bolted to the other half that went on the bottom of the neck.
    It had a sharp point on the back side of the part sticking up and also the part sticking down. When the cow tried to push her head through a hole in the fence, the fence pushed against the ends of the yoke causing it to fold in the middle and the sharp points would stick her in the top, and bottom of the neck. Old Red was always the trouble maker, and she got to wear it. They were quite effective. I have one hanging in my garage now.

    People that didn't have a boughten metal one would cut a fork fron a small tree putting the two ends up around the neck, and running a rope across over the neck to hold it in place. It took an impressive sized hole for a bovine to walk through with a young tree on their neck.