Boutique Diesel

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by YuccaFlatsRanch, Oct 12, 2006.

  1. YuccaFlatsRanch

    YuccaFlatsRanch Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Signs have appeared on the diesel pumps in this area warning that the diesel in the pump is ILLEGAL to put into 2007 diesel engines.

    Are they changing diesel fuel and if they change it to accomodate new 2007 engines, what will we have to add to it to run the new stuff in older engines?? Is anyone in charge saying anything about this anywhere??
     
  2. cfabe

    cfabe Well-Known Member

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    Yes they are changing to an ultra low sulfur diesel fuel, along with more emissions controls on the 2007 vehicles. "They" (the great unknown they) say that the new diesel will work fine in older engines, but that remains to be seen. I believe the main issue is that the sulfur added lubrication properties to the fuel and some injection pumps that are prone to wear failures may have problems with the new fuel which uses some other sort of lubricity additives instead of sulfur. The new 2007 diesels have particulate filters and catalytic converters which will be ruined by the older high sulfur diesel fuel.
     

  3. beowoulf90

    beowoulf90 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was just talking to the mechanic that services the company's vehicles. He told me that the new diesel has NO sulfer and that we have been using the ultra low sulfer fuel since the late 90's.

    I was told that the new diesel has no lubricants and you need to add a lubricant to you fuel. He also told me that they are getting alot of work because the fuel pumps in the diesels are breaking.
    So if you are running an older diesel you will need to add a lubricant to your fuel so the parts don't wear out. The best one I've found at the moment has been Lubrcitity or spell something like that... from what I've found it is the only one so far that is EPA approved and I haven't noticed any side affects in my backhoe (1967 Massey Ferguson model 2200)

    Hope that helps..
     
  4. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Several years ago they dropped the level of sulfur in diesel fuel.

    Now they are lowering the level a whole lot.

    And in a short bit of time, they will drop it to near zero.

    All so there are less emmisions from diesel engines; and so cat converters can be used with them to lower other types of emissions.

    But, we end up with 3-4 different engine standards, and a mandate to only sell the latest type of diesel fuel.

    Old engines may have problems with the new fuels - some of the old injector pumps rely upon the fuel to lubricate them. Now there is little to no natural lubricity in the fuel. _Some_ suppliers are adding lubricity packages, but this is inconsistent.....

    New engines will choke if they use the old fuels......

    The deadline for some of this is October 15th, so yea you will see signs for it.

    Bio-fuel (typically soybean oil, but the frier oil some of you experiment with) does a good job of adding lubricity back to the fuel as low as a 2% mix, so if you are running B2 - B5 you should be in good shape & not need any other additives.

    I realize, like NAIS and other govt programs that are mandates, this one is not well reported in traditional news media. But, something we in the ag world have heard about for the past 3-4 years now. Certianly something to keep on top of.

    The problems will be the 'notch' vehicles - those designed for the pretty low but not lowest version of sulfur fuel. That fuel will not be around for very long.

    The experts are kinda vague on what happens to the 3 differet spec'ed engines when we get to the lowest sulfur levels. Basically, they say well things should kinda be alright, but lubricity addives will be needed, but the suppliers should maybe have those added maybe anyhow...... So, really, things should work out just fine. We think, probably.......

    Typical. We are the test subjects. :)

    From everything I have heard, bio-fuel additions is the _best_ route to keep the new fuels compatable with both new & old engines. It keeps the lubricity high enough for old engine designs. Here in Minnesota B2 is mandated in all diesel fuel for just over a year, fortunately. In most parts of the country it is possible to buy a drum of B-100 & add it to your fuel; or order a B-mix from your supplier. There are also bottles of additives - but those get spendy if you are running 100's of gallons or more of diesel a year, the B-bleds are better solution.

    All this is one reason diesel fuel has risen in price over the past year. The EPA folks don't like diesel I guess, have to mess with it. The refineries all had to be rebuilt to make the almost-no-sulfur fuels, and different addtives needed by the suppliers/ retailers.

    -->Paul
     
  5. sullen

    sullen Question Answerer

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    "tanks" for the info, when I do get a diesel it wil be 07 or newer.
     
  6. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    In reality the new fuel, Is very low sulpher. And it will cause failure to the O rings in the injectors. The last issue of the Flying J newsletter had A in depth article on this. You may be able to obtain A read of it from the web site for flying J The new fuel is to be used, But retailers are phasing out the older fuel that is in the supply chain, Thats why the warings on the pumps.
     
  7. Boss Cooker

    Boss Cooker Well-Known Member

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    :flame: The low sulpher fuel cost me an injection pump on my Dodge. $2400.00 when the job was complete. When ever I get a chance I put off road fuel in the tank. And also add a quart of transmission fluid as well. My air compressors are John Deere powered. I was told not to run low sulpher in them or face the same problem. Check out www.greasecar.com there is a lot of good information there. :hobbyhors
     
  8. dezeeuwgoats

    dezeeuwgoats Well-Known Member

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    Hi. DH and I own a 98 Dodge250 Cummins diesel and also a 2001 VW Golf that is also diesel. Will this effect either of these vehicles? What should I watch for, or do for preventative measures?

    We will be either buying a conversion kit, or building a biodiesel contraption as soon as we can figure out which one is the better thing to do. If we do a conversion it would be for the Dodge, as it is our commercial vehicle.

    thanks;
    Niki
     
  9. Radidio

    Radidio junior geezer in training

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    Anybody going home made bio diesel? Lot of sources out there for makeing it yourself. Will solve the lubrication problem since it uses spent frying oil from restaurants mainly; with no sulphur.
     
  10. james dilley

    james dilley Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I was at Stewart Atevenson 2 weeks ago they said they are seeing Alot more diesel engines needing the injectors and O rings as well as pump trouble since the new diesel came out..
     
  11. Hip_Shot_Hanna

    Hip_Shot_Hanna Well-Known Member

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    Take it from a retired diesel mechanic - EXACTLY!!!!

    A Cummins diesel fuel injection system's life is cut by 3/4 when running on ultra low or no sulfur fuel. I got around it by putting a pint of standard multi-grade engine oil in 100 gallons of diesel. That is enough to save all the problems and extreme cost of repairing the fuel systems.
     
  12. farmerscotty

    farmerscotty Well-Known Member

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  13. palani

    palani Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the info. Looks like we will start blending in soy oil.
     
  14. edcopp

    edcopp Well-Known Member

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    All this information will be put into my memory bank. I should be able to afford a 2007 model in a dozen years or so. :)