bottom land

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Kygardengal, Sep 25, 2004.

  1. Kygardengal

    Kygardengal Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    344
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Location:
    Kentucky
    What can I do with about 8 acres of "bottom land"? It borders a creek that floods mostly in the spring. It is common to have anywhere from 4-10 feet of water about 5 times a year. It drains in a day or two. I was thinking about fencing it and putting calves or sheep on it but I am not sure. I can't think of any crop I can put on it that would stand that much water at a time. If I put any livestock on it, I have to be ready to move them to higher ground quickly if need be. I thought about using it for grazing only during the drier times of year. With that much water, I 'm not even sure if a fence will stay put. Help me out here and tell me what would you do with it?
     
  2. John_in_Houston

    John_in_Houston Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    311
    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2003
    'The Contrary Farmer' author suggested Black Walnut trees, if I remember correctly...
     

  3. mtman

    mtman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,260
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2004
    Location:
    AR
    how about cypress good market and they dont mind water
     
  4. Oilpatch197

    Oilpatch197 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    700
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2004
    Location:
    SouthEastern Illinois
    hmm we got the same kind around here, bottom land, not very good farmground, the flood water will really affect yeilds. Around here there is a Mild current, so Bean stubble in the Upstream Feilds will "stop Up" your Fences, so will logs.

    My Grandpa gave up on Our 40 acres that floods about 5 times a year, he put it in a Goverment program and planted trees on it.
     
  5. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    7,154
    Joined:
    May 11, 2002
    I would work it up with a disc after the spring flood, then harrow it down smooth. I would seed it to REEDS CANARY GRASS. Later in the summer I would clip it to keep weeds and obnoxious stuff down. The next year, I'd make hay every time the grass got about knee high. After a couple years there will be nothing but grass growing there. You can get at least 3 heavy cutting of hay per year. It makes good hay as long as it doesn't get too mature. It would also pasture about 25 head of yearlings if you don't mind putting up a new electric fence along the creek after eack flood. Is there any possibility of putting the fence up on higher ground most of the way around it, and just running a new wire across the ends after the floods?
     
  6. Donovan K

    Donovan K Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    145
    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2004
    Location:
    Florida
    stop trying to fight nature.. embrace it.. dig it out so it retains the water.. grow rice, cranberries.. start a catfish, crawfish farm.. a pay fishing lake stocked with channel catfish...a general use farm pond.. an ice skating rink for the winter...tongue only slightly in cheek.
     
  7. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    11,112
    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2002
    Location:
    North Alabama
    I had 6 acres like that and pushed a pond in on it. :)
     
  8. Kygardengal

    Kygardengal Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    344
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Thanks guys, I knew I'd get some good ideas here. I am considering all of them at this time. I really want to come up with a good plan and give it a try. Thanks
     
  9. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    8,266
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2004
    Location:
    MN
    If it gets 4' deep with any current several times a year, you will not be happy with a fence. It will be knocked down.

    You can fence it with step in posts & a single hot wire, but this only works well with adult cattle, not little calves.... You would need to take up the fence be4 the hevy rains.

    I would go the hay route, if you are going into hay anyhow. Harvest it when it's dry. Let it be when it's wet. Best you can do with what you got.

    Or a govt program to establish habitat/ preserve wetlands.

    --->Paul
     
  10. Kygardengal

    Kygardengal Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    344
    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2004
    Location:
    Kentucky
    Actually Rambler, this is what I am currently doing with it. That much water at a time is hard to control. I love the idea of a crop like cranberries and stuff but that would take money that I don't have to spare right now. Also, this part of my property borders my neighbors, who have the same. None of us are doing anything but hay with it. It is a really beautiful part of my property, very secluded and full of wild life. I've also thought of ways to preserve wildlife.
    Thanks again to all who responded. It is so good to get some fresh ideas.