bottle calf

Discussion in 'Cattle' started by Briano, Apr 4, 2018.

  1. Briano

    Briano Active Member

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    about how much replace should a 2 week bottle heifer drink 20180403_162800.jpg
     
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  2. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    I'd stick with whats recommend on the the MR bag. Another good idea is to ask the seller of the calf, they have been feeding this calf for the past two weeks. I'm not trying to be a wise guy, just thought it would be good advice. To many variables, here's a quick one, the type of MR being fed is critical, weight of calf, what it's been fed up to its current age. If I was a beginner I'd be asking the seller. My two cents....Topside
     

  3. BevFong

    BevFong New Member

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    Nice advice!!
     
  4. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    Great looking calf
     
  5. Briano

    Briano Active Member

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    thank you
     
  6. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    So Briano, how's the new calf, and what amount of milk replacer did you decide on per feeding? Topside
     
  7. Briano

    Briano Active Member

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    she's is doing real good. she is drinking a full bottle (2 quarts) twice a day . she is nibbling on hay and eating a cup of calf starter
     
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  8. HDRider

    HDRider Well-Known Member

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    I got one like that, same age, same look. He is a hog. I was doing 10 quarts a day, and just upped it to 12.

    I have not seen him eat hay, grass or any feed yet.
     
  9. Gravytrain

    Gravytrain Well-Known Member

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    Yikes. I think I'd be worried about scours with that volume of MR at that age. Any MR manufacture that I've ever used recommends somewhere around 2 quarts twice/day to start with the option to raise that to 3 quarts twice/day for larger breeds. On the other hand, he'll be a brute if you can get away with it...unless the economics of it don't get you first. ;)
     
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  10. topside1

    topside1 Retired Coastie Supporter

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    Brian, stick with 2qts per feeding and don't be tempted to make changes. If the current feeding program is working don't break the routine and your calf will thrive. Add grain to her diet free choice, keep up the milk regiment, and she will do amazing. Topside
     
  11. HDRider

    HDRider Well-Known Member

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    I guess I am over feeding. I went back and read the instructions. It says 2 to 3 quarts, twice daily.

    He acts like he is starving. He does not have scours.
     
  12. M5farm

    M5farm Well-Known Member

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    keeping them on recommended amount keeps them a little hungry and will aid in getting them to eating starter
     
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  13. HDRider

    HDRider Well-Known Member

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    Makes sense
     
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  14. Briano

    Briano Active Member

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    wow 10 quarts a day and milk replacer is not cheap. This little lady is now eating about a pound of calf starter twice a day and is now drinking water to go along with her bottles. The last calf i did i fed from a bottle this one we bought a bucket with the nipple on and wow is it nice. Hang the bucket she goes to town and i do the rest of the barn chores. In a couple weeks i'm going to try and wean her from the nipple bucket completely and go to a regular bucket (the last one took me about a month)
     
  15. HDRider

    HDRider Well-Known Member

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    I have cut that back to 4 quarts of milk and 4 quarts of water. I have put out starter, and a pan of water, but he has not touched either.
     
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  16. Briano

    Briano Active Member

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    in my experience they will not touch water until after you start taking the milk away at least not much. with this calf i put about a quart in the bucket nipple feeder after the milk is gone to get her used to the cold water and taste now.
     
  17. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Why would you want to shift her from a nipple feeder to a bucket? A nipple feeder (sucking) is much better for her and exactly the same amount of work for you. Mine stay on nipple feeder (we call them calfaterias) until they are weaned - usually around 12 to 15 weeks of age. Leave her on it until weaning.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
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  18. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Rider, you have one very spoilt calf:D and that's all good. If she's not scouring and is coping with that amount of milk, carry on with what your doing. Put out starter grain but only a small amount to avoid wastage and the birds getting most of it. She'll get to it in the due course of time.

    I started my farming over 40 years ago. There were no fancy calf supplements back then. Dairy herd owners mothered on calves to cows, what calf rearers were around fed them milk and good grass/hay. The hike in the price of milk powder changed all that and supplementary calf feed became the order of the day because it was cheaper than feeding milk powder - the sooner you could wean them the better. When I look at my beef reared calves and my hand reared calves, it's not hard to see the difference.

    You continue with what you have been doing because it would seem the calf (and your wallet) can deal with it. I'm not joking, you will end up with the better calf. Which is why, when I did calf rearing, I milked my own cows rather than buy in milk powder. I could feed them what they could deal with for as long as I wished to, there was milk for the pigs, dogs, chooks and us. There is more than one way to kill a cat - really, quite a revolting saying but gets the point across.

    Oh, and by the way, fresh water should be left out for calves from day one and this is a must. While many won't be seen drinking, they do actually have the odd slurp and I've watched 3 day old calves drink off mum and immediately go to the trough for a drink of water. Don't force them to drink water but make it available to them.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  19. sammyd

    sammyd Well-Known Member

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    Were you farming on Mars? Been on the farm or around one since 69 and we never ran the calves on the cows and we have always fed a good calf starter.

    I do agree that fresh water should be available at all times. I usually dump it and replace at every feeding.
    The water does more good for the calf if it is taken as water and not as a bottle. It will go to the rumen and help it develop.
     
  20. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Excuse me Sammyd but you are being rude, extremely rude. I live in a country which primary income comes from farming and always has done and probably always will simply because there is nothing else. Our deposits of anything that will lead to manufacturing don't exist in large enough quantities.

    I might be a little bit later on the scene than you - like by about 3 years, Wow - and we probably didn't and still don't do things by American standards. I started my farming life on a dairy farm and you won't believe this but the best producing cows were pulled out of the herd to rear the calves. They would have two or three calves each which they reared for something like 5 months before the calves were weaned and the cows put back into the milking herd. These calves got no additional supplementary feed as they didn't need it - just like a beef calf doesn't need it. End result - well grown, thrifty calves that were going to go on to belong to the herd, and a cow that went back into the herd producing more than her herd mates.

    The way I do things today has changed thanks to age but last week I weaned calves and have started to milk some of the mothers for the house, chooks and pigs. I guess I must be farming on Mars!
     
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