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Wood Nymph / Toxophilite
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Q: Age and breed of the animal.
A: Three or four days, jersey bull calf (picked him up at the dairy today)

Q: Temperature--normal is 100-103
A: 102.x

Q: Is it dehydrated (usually in calves)?
A: A little. Skin tents but doesn't remain so for very long.

Q: What and how much have you been feeding? Is it still eating and drinking? How long since it has?
A: I was told he had a "full bottle" this morning. At the dairy he had free choice water and chopped hay that looked like grass hay. I fed this evening and he drank a little over a pint. I have not given them access to solid feeds, but they do have access to water.

Q: How is it acting? Lethargic? Active? Able to stand? Head down? Eyes Bright or dull? Uncoordinated? Hunched up when standing? Distended Abdomen? If so, which side or both? Limps?
A: Was bright and alert was up and around a little bit this afternoon but prefers to just lay still. He is still feisty and not willing to let me drench him or make him take the bottle. But if you're not pressing the issue, he won't do anything on his own. He does hunch up when he poops. Is capable of standing so long as you don't mess with him and cause him to struggle.

Q: Does the calf have scours (diarrhea)?
A: YES! More yellow than brown, consistency of thick yogurt with a little chunkiness, streaked with a fair amount of blood.

Q: How is it breathing? Labored? Rapidly? Normally?
A: Seems normal to me for the age and heat we've been having.

Q: Any discharge from nose, mouth, elsewhere? What's it look like? Does it smell?
A: Nose. Whitish, opaque. Not smelly.
Eyes are teary, but not discharging.

Q: Any other symptoms?
A: No.

I picked him up at the dairy today around noon. He was up and around a bit just after he got home. The navel was dry but I hit it with iodine just to be safe. I gave him 4.5ml of LA 200 and 1oz of Nutri-drench. At that point he was a little scoury, and had a wetter nose than normal. I chalked it up to his age, combined with the heat, and being moved.

Tonight around 7 we went down to do chores and he was up (yay!). My husband got a half pint in him, and noted the blood in his poop. I got another half pint into him and notice the teary eyes and snotty nose.

I'm mostly worried about the bloody scours combined with the snotty nose and increasing lethargy.

He took his first half pint of milk replacer just fine and I pushed the issue to get the other half pint into him.

I'm going to mix up some electrolytes for him tonight.

Should I be thinking about some more colostrum (I've been reading about the thicker milk being beneficial in the gut), probiotics, coccidiosis treatment?

Thanks all!
 

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A shot of la300 is what he needs. When we have a scouring calf we give extra medicated milk for morning and evening feeding and a bottle of electrolytes in middle of day until scouring stops.
 

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Wood Nymph / Toxophilite
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
UPDATE:

When I went down to check him he had moved.
He was sitting up and looking around.
His eyes were bright and ears alert.
The snotty nose was gone, or at least not as apparent.
He got up on his own power - a little unsteady - but all the way to his feet with average effort.
Poop was a little thicker but still presented with blood - though less streaked and more blobbish. I hesitate to call it clotted.
He grunted audibly when he pooped.
He was interested in the flashlight and what I was up to but resisted having his temperature taken and actively fought me on taking the bottle. BUT - he struggled with me and still stayed on his feet; even moo'ed at one point to lodge his complaint.
His bottle was three ounces of milk replacer in one pint of water with a half ounce of electrolyte solution (I don't blame him for not wanting it, it smelled yucky). I did get him to take about an eigth of it before I decided to not press the issue.
He pee'd. Then wagged his tail.
Looked for a place to lay down and did so deliberately (as opposed to falling).
Then he passed gas.

I know better than to get my hopes up with a little guy this young, but I was pleased with his improvement.
 

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UPDATE:

When I went down to check him he had moved.
He was sitting up and looking around.
His eyes were bright and ears alert.
The snotty nose was gone, or at least not as apparent.
He got up on his own power - a little unsteady - but all the way to his feet with average effort.
Poop was a little thicker but still presented with blood - though less streaked and more blobbish. I hesitate to call it clotted.
He grunted audibly when he pooped.
He was interested in the flashlight and what I was up to but resisted having his temperature taken and actively fought me on taking the bottle. BUT - he struggled with me and still stayed on his feet; even moo'ed at one point to lodge his complaint.
His bottle was three ounces of milk replacer in one pint of water with a half ounce of electrolyte solution (I don't blame him for not wanting it, it smelled yucky). I did get him to take about an eigth of it before I decided to not press the issue.
He pee'd. Then wagged his tail.
Looked for a place to lay down and did so deliberately (as opposed to falling).
Then he passed gas.

I know better than to get my hopes up with a little guy this young, but I was pleased with his improvement.
I don't claim to know everything about calves but I do know a lot because that's our bread and butter but I was told by vet to never mix the electrolytes with milk. It can cause bloating and death. If he still has blood in stool I'd hit him up with a cocc dose. Also after giving any meds we always give gut bugs to give back the good fighting organisms
 

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Wood Nymph / Toxophilite
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Discussion Starter #6
DAY TWO:

Moved overnight.
Got up when I came in.
Bright and alert.
Eyes are still a little teary and nose still really wet but no sign of the snot from yesterday.
Ate two pints quick as you please - a strong eater, no messing around like those silly older brothers.
Followed me around and rooted for more (woo hoo).
Poop still loose and he grunts pretty good getting it out but his butt is staying clean.
Still a little blood but it's starting to change to the really dark brown of "old blood" and there is -by percentage- less of it.
Skin does not tent at all.

Still cautious, I know that at his age he's not out of the woods yet, but I'm pleased with his progress.
 

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Wood Nymph / Toxophilite
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1,615 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
His brother took up the mantle, though.

Refuses to nurse, so for now I'm drenching replacer and electrolytes (alternating) and making him get up and move around.

He's lethargic and got a bit of a rattle in his breathing but I think it's just mucus buildup since he's not moving much.

So for now we generally make a nuisance of ourselves until he either gets better or gives up.
 

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Thank you. Part of farm life but never an easy part.
It's always so confusing when the seemingly strong ones fail without an obvious reason.

However, the other three are eating good, playing, drinking water and seem to be off and running.
Sometimes farm life can be very hard. I have my moments of weakness
 

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Wood Nymph / Toxophilite
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1,615 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Hey Tiffany,
Can you give a quick tutorial on the egg thing?
Hot milk? Shaken vs stirred? Temper the egg first?
Thanks.
 

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Unpaid, Volunteer Devil's Advocate
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Since this forum is mostly opinion, I'd like to offer an opposing opinion. IMHO, eggs do nothing at best, add the risk of salmonella at worst. It contains many compounds that the calf is unable to digest. The "wives' tale version" has eggs coating the intestine, settling the gut.
 

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I have had occasional bottle calves and currently have three. One of them got sicker than sick when I first brought it home and STUPIDLY transitioned it too quickly to straight goat milk. I started on electrolytes and read read read articles. I decided to try the Penn State University electrolyte recipe (great article)as I was giving electrolytes every4-5 hours ( and the cost at the feed store was prohibitive) to keep him hydrated. It worked wonders
1 tsp. low sodium salt
2 tsp. baking soda
1 ¾ oz. (1 packet) fruit pectin
1 can beef consommé
Add water to make 2 quarts. Feed at the rate of 1 pint per 10 pounds of bodyweight 3 to 4 times a day. Feed milk 2 to 3 hours before or after due to bicarbonate content.
 
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