Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

Registered
Joined
412 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is this the norm? Is so, what is the consenus on advertising or do experienced horse people know that the color is only a best guess?

Thanks
 

Banned
Joined
30,992 Posts
Is this the norm? Is so, what is the consenus on advertising or do experienced horse people know that the color is only a best guess?

Thanks
Both colors are a single cream dilution but on different base colors- buckskin is cream on bay, and palomino is cream on chestnut. So, the horse in question couldn't have been born one and turned into the other.
 

Premium Member
Joined
6,491 Posts
How would the smokey gene fit in? Could you have a smokey buckskin? I don't remember if that is a different sort of dilution, but could it turn the black points very light grey and be confusing?

Ok, I did some research, no, the smoky gene makes the buckskin on a bay. What I was thinking of is the silver dapple that lightens the black points. It is common in Rocky Mountian Horses, for instance. This site shows a picture of a Silver Dapple buckskin if you scroll down a bit.

http://www.whitehorseproductions.com/ecg_basics2.html

That might be a possibility - it would be born looking buckskin, then the black points wash out. Or maybe someone was just confused by the foal color, certainly they seem to be pretty different from the adult colors sometimes!
 

Banned
Joined
30,992 Posts
How would the smokey gene fit in? Could you have a smokey buckskin? I don't remember if that is a different sort of dilution, but could it turn the black points very light grey and be confusing?

Ok, I did some research, no, the smoky gene makes the buckskin on a bay. What I was thinking of is the silver dapple that lightens the black points. It is common in Rocky Mountian Horses, for instance. This site shows a picture of a Silver Dapple buckskin if you scroll down a bit.

http://www.whitehorseproductions.com/ecg_basics2.html

That might be a possibility - it would be born looking buckskin, then the black points wash out. Or maybe someone was just confused by the foal color, certainly they seem to be pretty different from the adult colors sometimes!
Smoky buckskin (I call it smutty) could make a horse look brown, but not gold. Smutty palomino just takes the shine off the gold to me, usually it's just the base of the tail is darker.

It very well could have looked buckskin and had a darker mane, tail, and points but shed out lighter but it could have never been buckskin and turned palomino.
 

Banned
Joined
30,992 Posts
Thank you! I felt silly even asking but this person is supposed to be knowledgeable.
Do you know the colors of the sire and dam? And the breed(s) as well?
 

Premium Member
Joined
6,491 Posts
Yes, I figured that... it could have been a palomino that looked dark when it was born, right?

I was looking at the color charts and the silver dapple is another can of worms, so was wondering if that was a possibility. Maybe our silver dapple breeder will help us out there! Sharon, what do you think?
 

Banned
Joined
30,992 Posts
Yes, I figured that... it could have been a palomino that looked dark when it was born, right?

I was looking at the color charts and the silver dapple is another can of worms, so was wondering if that was a possibility. Maybe our silver dapple breeder will help us out there! Sharon, what do you think?
Most, if not all, foals look different when they've shed their foal coat.
 
  • Like
Reactions: aoconnor1

Banned
Joined
30,992 Posts
Absolutely palomino, not buckskin. The light mane and tail are indicators of cream on chestnut.

I didn't realize the seller is still convinced that the weanling is buckskin. It's really obvious she's not.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DamnearaFarm

Registered
Joined
412 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
No, you were correct in your initial assumption.

When I questioned her after seeing the additional pics she stated "born buckskin, now palomino".
 

Premium Member
Joined
9,235 Posts
That is very strange. The photo of the filly at 4 months shows a very obviously palomino ... can't think of any way she could have been foaled with a mane and tail dark enough to make someone think she was buckskin.

The only color I know of that sheds off lighter from the baby coat is champagne and I'm not even sure that champagne exists in Quarter Horses. Also, a champagne (gold champagne, which resembles palomino) would be foaled "red" ... looking like a sorrel ... not a 'gold' body with black mane and tail.

Silver would dilute the black mane and tail, but there is only one line of silvers in the QH breed I think ... unlikely that the breeders would have one without knowing it and you would not be likely to see the creamy white mane and tail with a silver buckskin ... and as far as I know you don't get a dark mane/tail that sheds white with the baby shed.
 

Premium Member
Joined
1,618 Posts
I almost never call a color until they shed out their foal coat, with exception of a bay. I have a grey filly right now that was chestnut at birth, and a yearling bay roan that was a chestnut when born. My pretty bay TB/Friesian filly was solid black until this summer then colored out a dark bay (dangit!). I wait to register until shortly before they turn 6 months so I have some sort of color I can fairly solidly call them:)

But I agree, a buckskin doesn't turn into a palomino!
 

Banned
Joined
30,992 Posts
I almost never call a color until they shed out their foal coat, with exception of a bay. I have a grey filly right now that was chestnut at birth, and a yearling bay roan that was a chestnut when born. My pretty bay TB/Friesian filly was solid black until this summer then colored out a dark bay (dangit!). I wait to register until shortly before they turn 6 months so I have some sort of color I can fairly solidly call them:)

But I agree, a buckskin doesn't turn into a palomino!
Again, a horse cannot be born chestnut and turn bay. There are only two different colors, red and black. Chestnut is red based, and bay is black based. The bay roan may have had very light black points, mane, and tail but he/she was born bay. Greys are always born their base color, and then go grey. It often starts as a grey circle around their eyes, and can look pretty funny for a while.

I agree that it's much better to wait until they shed out the foal coat to determine color.
 

Premium Member
Joined
1,618 Posts
Again, a horse cannot be born chestnut and turn bay. There are only two different colors, red and black. Chestnut is red based, and bay is black based. The bay roan may have had very light black points, mane, and tail but he/she was born bay. Greys are always born their base color, and then go grey. It often starts as a grey circle around their eyes, and can look pretty funny for a while.

I agree that it's much better to wait until they shed out the foal coat to determine color.
I had to go back to my pics of my bay roan, and my
mistake...he did have bay points and main/tail. I didn't remember that, it's been a year and a half!

My grey filly was a lovely chestnut that went grey. Yep, started around her eyes and muzzle, as her full brother 3 years ago. Now, at 3.5 months she has become a pretty grey. I believe she will go through several shade colors before she levels off as a dapple grey, eventually going mostly white.
 

Registered
Joined
14,353 Posts
The only palomino foal I ever had was born vitually white, blue eyes, no color to the skin. I was horrified.
She stayed that way til her first spring- when she turned chocolate brown. I said whoopee.
When her winter coat came in, it was back to white. In spring, some brown on her chest and neck, otherwise palomino. Winter muddy white.
By her third spring she was just a medium palomino and stayed there, getting whiter in the winter and bright gold in the spring.
It was a real roller coaster.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top