Bore Sighting for new scope?

Discussion in 'The Great Outdoors' started by moonwolf, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    The rifle I got has scope mounts as the guy I got the gun from wanted to keep the scope that was on it for his other rifle. fine. So, I bought a new scope and attached it to the mounts.
    I shot a few rounds at the target 50 yds. and 100 yds. Not even close to the center. With the open sights it's accurate. Looks like I need to bore sight it.
    what's the best solution for this without needing to fire multiples of rounds of ammo to adjust the scope settings?
    how often do you bore sight your hunting rifles? what method or preferred type of bore sighting device that isn't going to be expensive?
     
  2. Paquebot

    Paquebot Well-Known Member

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    If you can use the open sights while still having the scope mounted, then you've got what I have on my .222, "see-through" mounts. I can easily check the scope against the open sights. With those, you should be able to zero that scope in without firing a single shot. First, you know that the open sights are dead-on. Those sights would thus be calibrated to the bore. Lock onto a target with the open sights plus bore and adjust scope accordingly. With just the bore for reference, there's a slight chance for error. With open sights also included, it's almost impossible to not get the scope almost dead-on without expending a lot of ammunition.

    Martin
     

  3. Bear

    Bear Well-Known Member

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    If its a bolt action; this is what I used to do before I bought a bore sighter. Make sure you have a good stable rest, such as a couple sandbags. Remove the bolt from the action. Position the rifle on the bags so it's good and solid and look thru the barrel centering it on the bullseye. Look thru the scope and make your adjustments bringing your hairlines to the bullseye. It may not be as accurate as a bore sighter, but darn close
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    I think this is what the others are saying, but I'll say it my way. Put the rifle in a gun vise, shoot a bullet in the target. Without moving the rifle, adjust the crosshairs to crossover the hole you just put in the target.
     
  5. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Cabin Fever has told you the easiest way adjsut your scope. A vise is necessary to do it right. It will save you a lot of ammo. It will also help if you start at about 25 yds and then move out as you get closer to having it like you want it. If youre already hitting the target "bore sighting" wont help.
     
  6. poorboy

    poorboy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Might work for a .22, but if you clamp a highpower tightly enough to stop all movement your gonna DAMAGE something. Proper way is to bed it good in sandbags and aim at your target and shoot, then re-align the cross hairs with the bullseye(making sure the gun is in the same position when fired), Then adjust the crosshairs to the bullet hole..:)
     
  7. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    You dont have to clamp it to fire it. You clamp it AFTER firing so the gun cant move while making the scope adjustments.. What I do is set up sandbags and take a VERY careful shot while aiming at the center of the target. Then you set up your vise so the crosshairs are once again on the center of the target. Then WITHOUT moving the gun at all, turn the scope adjustments untill the crosshairs are on the bullet hole. Theres no way to do all that on just sandbags without the gun moving. Once its adjsuted you never have to "bore sight " it again. Bore sighting is just an estimate to get you on the paper for fine tuning