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Earlier this year, I was contacted by a couple wishing to write their second book entitled "City to Survival in 28 Days". After hearing their story, ideas, and how they even knew of me, I happily agreed. Come to find out, One of my good friends is kin to the couple and had described how we grew up in the hills and on the river banks years ago.

After meeting the couple, I think they may be a little crazy but have a good idea of writing a book that would be about as close to the real thing as possible. Their idea is to go buy 2 ready made bobs (bug out bags), packing a few clothes and personal items in them, and that's their only possessions on this journey. I already have my bag ready and at any moment, I call them up and we bug out..

After all the discussions and a few beers later, the couple started asking me questions about why I wouldn't do it without my dog. After hearing my reply on the importance of her skills, They are insisting on me writing a book from start to finish of how she came to be..


So I guess my first question is, how many would actually be interested in reading a "how to" book on training a pup for survival use?

my next question is, What skills would you like to have this pup do??

And my last question is, What should her name be?

So here is the beginning of my book pictured below... Unnamed Redbone female at 4 weeks old..

 

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After hearing my reply on the importance of her skills, They are insisting on me writing a book from start to finish of how she came to be..
Well, for one, there's your start. What kind of skills does YOUR dog have?

What is a redbone? why did you pick that breed?

I know there are "hunting" dogs that can track, retrieve and keep quiet. But I don't know (and wouldn't even know where to begin to be able to ponder) what skills a dog would bring to the table unless it was "cartage" of some sort (i.e. a "pack dog"). All that being said, I think it's an interesting idea to have a "survival dog".
 

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trained to hand signals and silent whistle....my old female elkhound died awhile back and i feel sorta lost .


most dont understand what a real working dog can do.

name= red sonja or nuke

is that pup from timberchopper line?being that dark it just has to be in my mind.


purely from a survival standpoint.....i want a silent mouthed dog
 

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also you might want to include a section on non traditional dogs that many might not consider....non hound type dogs

such as airdale,rat terrier,elkhound,jack russel,scotch collie,blue heeler

a section on earth dogs too....they are overlooked dogs and most dont know or understand how they operate and the importance of them and say some type of lurcher on a homestead.not everyone will or is able to bug out and need a type dog that can fit their abilities and needs.like older folks staying put etc. etc.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Well, for one, there's your start. What kind of skills does YOUR dog have?

What is a redbone? why did you pick that breed?

I know there are "hunting" dogs that can track, retrieve and keep quiet. But I don't know (and wouldn't even know where to begin to be able to ponder) what skills a dog would bring to the table unless it was "cartage" of some sort (i.e. a "pack dog"). All that being said, I think it's an interesting idea to have a "survival dog".
A Redbone is a type of **** dog. They have a natural instinct to run and tree *****. They have an extremely high metabolism and endurance, but what sets them apart from other **** hounds is their heart. They live to please their owner in everything they do. A redbone is extremely easy to train and discipline.. They have a nose of a blood hound and the running gears of a race horse.

For starts, one must think outside the box a minute.. A decently trained dog can provide warmth, food, and security. Some offers more or less depending on the depth of training.

Macey, My 11 month old in training, tracks and locates any family member I tell her to go find. If I tell her to go home, she'll go home to the back door, and scratch. When someone opens the door, she will lead them back to me. She trails and trees about anything that will climb, a lot of things she is fast enough to catch and brings them back to me. She will "blood trail" a wounded deer, but won't run one if I didn't put her on that track.

We are working on security issues.. I have her now where she wont bark, but has a low rumbling growl when things come around. I can send her out to what ever it is..

She's also a pretty warm buddy that likes to sleep at my feet... I really hate cold feet..

She also does a lot around the farm keeping critters at bay and letting me know when things come around
 

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Aww, what a cutie! I agree with all of the above. I'd also like to see her trained to fetch certain items on command, such as phone, water (in a bottle), medicine, keys, etc. (I've had dogs I've trained to do this in the past). I'm not sure if it's possible, but maybe training her to lay next to you or even on you in case you were hurt or unconscious or in shock would be good.

Train her to protect (you or family members), guard (an interloper, etc.) to keep them from moving, and attack (an enemy human or animal) and which areas to go for first. Teaching them to "spy" (hide behind a chair or other object while keeping an eye on a stranger) until given an attack command is a really good feature.

Love the hand signal idea Elk! I've trained dogs to do "quiet" responses where they let out a barely discernible "whuff" to "loud" responses that would hurt your ears, both of which can come in handy. Staying perfectly still and silent (no matter what else is doing on) until you give the command otherwise is always good.

Teach her to not eat anything, even if it's put right under her nose, until you give her the safe command (handy for bringing you food in a SHTF scenario or keeping her from eating poisoned food).

Tracking by smell of individual family members is good. Packing on the back or pulling a small cart if they're the right kind of dog is good too, although she may not be big enough for that. A larger dog could also be taught to pull a rope, such as if you fell down an incline or into a hole and needed help getting out, but again she's probably not going to be big enough for that.

That's all I can think of at the moment, may have more later, lol. :) I know these are all possible (except for the lying next to or on you) because I've trained dogs to do them all in the past, and I've had no training myself in how to do this, just used common sense and a lot of patience. I agree with Elk that a lot of dogs can be trained to do these kinds of things, not just hound or hunting dogs.
 
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