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I would like to share my experience thus far.

I recently got a bond knitting machine. Other machines are to expensive.
I want to be able to make blankets from my homespun yarn fast since everyone I know wants one. LOL

I got it 1/2 price with the after holiday sales.
I was leery about buying it at first because it is plastic bodied but dam its sweet!

I did run into probs at first.

The carriage kept ripping yarn apart. I was feeling really disappointed at first.
But the problem was an easy fix. The manufacture left sharp edges on the plate thats in 'front' of the carriage, where it runs under the hooks. I filed it all smooth and no more ripping and damaging the yarn.

Then I didnt like the knit. I followed the instructions to the letter but the knit of the fabric had big holes while it was on the machine. I wanted a tight knit.
I found out after the piece is removed and relaxes, the knit is perfect and not holely looking at all.

I also have learned that when they say dont hold the yarn as you push the carriage, they mean it. You hold to latch on the first hook and then let the yarn free and just guide it. Any tension on that yarn knits so tight you drop stitches like crazy after that!

Dropping stitches I found to be a big complaint researching on line. I dont have any probs now that I am following those instructions to the tee.
Do not hold that yarn and create tension! Dont be fooled by the looks while the piece is hanging on the machine either!

I have now knitting 3 panels for the first blanket for my daughter and it took about 10 minutes a panel. Not bad for a first try IMO. It sure took longer by hand to do the same work.

I really like the machine.

I am happy with the results of the first experimental project and the time thats saved.

Oh the table...you have to have a table long enough and level. The table is major important and not just any table will do. It has to have a square edge with no roundness to it. It has to be fairly level. It has to be tall enough if you want long pieces as the work can not touch the floor or the weights wont pull the piece and the project will come off the machine.
You also need a chair that fits the table and you have to reach to work the machine. You cant let your legs press against the piece your working on as it hangs down.
You also have to have stretch to reach from one end of the machine to the other. Its an upper body workout! LOL

I know in time I will be able to make a lot of things. Right now I am mastering the basic learning and doing whats very needed with this machine...
practice, practice, practice!
 

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After reading your post maybe I'll try to work on mine again. I was starting to think that they were just junk. Every time I would try to get it to work the thing would jamm up on me so I finally gave up on it (I still have it but I haven't touched it in a long time.)

Thanks for your post!

Dora Renee' Wilkerson
 

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They are pretty neat. It will give you a fit if you use yarn that has bumps or slubs. I have one with the extended bed and I have an Artisian 70D double bed. Love making that rib with that. But no place to set it up right now.
 

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Island of Blueb
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Good to hear!

Yes, I learned that the table is very important too. And must be level. It seems funny now thinking of how much crying and cussing I did, trying to make it work. I would go along nicely for quite a while, then zip! Everything would fall off.

Gotta be LEVEL.

I have the extended bed too.

Thanks for the info.
 
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