boar to breed

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by myheaven, Aug 18, 2006.

  1. myheaven

    myheaven Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Ok Im looking to breed my hampshire girl with a duroc boy. Should I put an add in the paper to find an intact boy to breed with her. :shrug: Im dumb as to what to do. shell be ready to breed around december. "real" farmers most likely wont want to deal with me with chance of infection of some sort.
    any information will big a great help.
     
  2. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    One way to get a good, usable Boar is to talk to people that have sows and keep a boar. To avoid inbreeding of a Boar's daughters & Granddaughters, most folks will sell an older boar so they can get a new one with different bloodlines. Since most old boars go to commercial market at a low price, selling boar to you at a modest price is a win-win situation.
     

  3. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    I should think that Up North's post is fair comment and is possibly the best way for you to go.

    Your quite right about "real" farmers and I learnt this lesson to my cost. I allowed a sow to come here to run with my boar and she introduced Parvo into my herd. I then had to run the gauntlet of having every sow give birth to dead, mummified or low birthweight piglets until they had built up their own immunity to it and now have to ensure that any gilts run with older sows before going to the boar so they too can become immunised.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  4. RedHogs

    RedHogs Well-Known Member

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    Although you can't share a boar with a big farm, boars come and go at a relatively quick pace. My oldest duroc boar is 14 months and will be gone by march - april at the latest. Most farms cycle quickly for bloodline changes and handling issues....(size and temperment). I am probably too far away but others in your area will have boars that are finished at the farm and have no real commercial value. you might get a registered purebred in 500-1000 range for slightly over meat cost ......which is not worth the diesel to take to the sale barn. I would also not use any farm that is not state qualified or validated.....Most farms will be tested every 4-6 months and you know you are going to get a clean animal. A sale barn or untested farm is going to have a bug a fair percentage of the time, and if your luck is like mine you will get lucky. Use the National Swine Registry to find a breeder in your area, these farms will fit the bill and will usually love to take to you. Also Non-Duroc Breeders will often have duroc boar around the farm.
     
  5. theporkstork

    theporkstork Well-Known Member

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    Have you considered artificial insemination? There are Boar Studs all over the country with top-of=the-line boars to choose from. Semen cost is very reasonable when you choose "breed specific" rather than "boar" specific. Usually in the $10 to $15 per dose price range. Shipping, supplies, and semen costs will total $40 to $50, depending on how far the order is shipped.
    If you decide to go this route, email me for instructions on how to use A.I. and I'll be glad to give you the a-z instructions.

    Email: info@theporkstork.com
    Website: theporkstork.com
     
  6. Up North

    Up North KS dairy farmers

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    Sorry to hijack thread but this question came up. What is a state qualified or validated farm? What do they test for? Is it usually the really big hog farms that do this or is it common for smaller breeders to test their hogs?

    Thanks
    Heather
     
  7. sellis

    sellis Well-Known Member

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    hey pork stork can you pm me on how to ai a pig .....thanks sellis
     
  8. Misty

    Misty Misty Gonzales

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    it is where the hogs are tested and come back neg. for PRRS, Parvo and Pseudorabies. I'm not sure about the pseudorabies everywhere, but here in CO we are a stage 5 state which means there isn't any disease known here.
     
  9. highlands

    highlands Walter Jeffries Supporter

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    We don't loan out boars or bring in outside sows for fear of disease coming into our herd. It is a very real problem. You might be able to find someone who will loan you a boar, we did when we only had a few sows. The best solution is to either do AI or get your own boar. Our boars are very gentle. Back when we started I was apprehensive about them but they turned out to be quite docile.

    If you get a boar then get a few more sows. Having three sows on pasture makes it worth keeping a boar. I would keep him out on pasture with the sows and piglets.

    If you are keeping them more confined and grain feeding then it takes about six sows to make it worth feeding the boar.

    By the way, I do have a young boar for sale if you are in our area (Vermont). But you can get a uncut boar piglet and just raise him up if you're willing to wait. That is the cheapest route. If you do that, get two or three because not every boar is fertile just as not every gilt is fertile.