Boar Meat

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by Tango, Jul 22, 2004.

  1. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Recently I've found out that some people search out boar meat :eek: I can't imagine. When they are very young, under 30 pounds for instance, there is only the faintest smell in the meat- it usually comes through a little stronger when the pork is being reheated. I've gotten used to the slight smell and don't even notice it. Once we butchered a boar that weighed about 45 - 50 pounds (the wild pigs were very hard to guesstimate when we first started with them; their size is deceptive) and the smell was stronger than I could deal with. We ground up the pork into sausage and it isn't noticeably different than any other sausage. But I can't imagine a full grown boar for pork :eek:
     
  2. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Tango
    I have butchered boars up to 150 pounds that were o.k. but there is a trick! They must be very calm when you stun them. They should be in there normal area or pen when you dispatch them. If they are excited in any way or you have poor aim they will tend to smell. That has been my personel exp. and others may differ.
    Mr Wanda
    Mike
     

  3. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Mike, Really? I'm intrigued. The five or six we've done were hand tame young ones, born here, except the larger one. I shoot them at feeding time, regular time in the morning feeding while they are face down in the feeding bowl- one shot. I wouldn't have thought they were excited except for perhaps the feeding part. I wonder if the domestic vs wild has something to do with this or if it really just is excitement?
     
  4. I've never bothered to castrate my boars and found as long as you age the meat it has no bearing on the flavor. Not bleeding them however will alter the flavor negatively. I've read that a non-clean kill does too, but I've not yet encountered those
     
  5. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Can you elaborate on your post? How do you age the meat? What is a non-clean kill? BTW, my surprise at the people seeking our boar meat is really from the smelly pork and not what has been mentioned here so far. I was discussing it with a hunting lodge owner. I trade my adult boars for new stock after they are bred (unless they produce something outstanding) and always thought they went as trophy boars for the hunt, but was told they could also go into the meat pen as some people like the strong flavor. To me it smells like the nastiest public restroom. We are definitely speaking of strong flavor here.
     
  6. Wanda

    Wanda Well-Known Member

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    Tango
    Taste is a personal thing, I could not imagine butchering an adult male goat wieghing 150-175 pounds in full rut. Go to the livestock sales and you will see that these big stinkers will bring well over 100$ to the meat buyers!!!!!!!!! They make money on them so the end buyer is paying a premium price :eek: These animals are cooked far differantly than we do. The meat is used in small quanity's and heavily spiced. If you can tap a market for adult boars more power to you :) We have only had experiance with young domestic boar pigs so there may be a diferance in the wild strain.
    Mr Wanda
    Mike
     
  7. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    It isn't my market- I'm shocked the market exists at all :) as I said I trade my adults for some fresh blood every year. The hunting lodges around here probably have that market tapped well enough. This year I got two really nice looking wild pigs in trade for last year's stud and I am looking at purchasing a zoo strain pure bred Razorback, if I can swing the steep price and delivery (probably not but its worth dreaming on :) )
     
  8. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I mostly agree completely, although sows are a little milder in flavor than the boars, but the boar meat is still really good, and I like the stronger flavor. A non clean kill to me is the animal doesn't drop immediately. Pain releases the endorphines that some asian areas like the flavor of, particularly in dog. If you want a stronger flavor, simply put the fresh meat uncovered in the fridge for 24 hours prior to packaging, that will slightly dehydrate the meat and concentrate the flavor. after the meat has been packaged leave it in the fridge for a week prior to cooking or freezing. Allow it to come to room temp prior to cooking for a roaast, but for pulled pork that is not neccarry

     
  9. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    Thanks GeorgeK. It seems to me we are speaking of completely different things in this thread. I am going to go back to speak with some of the lodge owners who have experience with the wild boars to see if there is a difference. Having never raised a domestic boar, I can't compare. But according to your definition, my kills are clean, so there shouldn't be any difference. Interesting topic.
     
  10. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Why not just wop off their little knackers?
     
  11. Tango

    Tango Well-Known Member

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    :haha: well I will be doing that from now on when they are a few days old. These little ones had us ery busy for several weekends in a row butchering little males so they wouldn't get past the weight limit before they start wreaking. PIglet, btw, is a fine fine roast- absolutely fantastic. But the stud boar, well he'll have to keep his and by the time he's 18 months or so, I am not about to castrate him :) I did some investigating on the net yesterday and found out there are two male hormones responsible for the smell. A couple of posts on this forum last year also spoke about the horrible urine smell of wild boar.
     
  12. GeorgeK

    GeorgeK Well-Known Member

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    I dont think it's worth the bother, that's all. I've not seen any significant difference in the meat of intact boars as opposed to sows with the exception of the fat content, sows have more, so they tend to have a softer meat and milder flavor. Castration is a surgical procedure and although the risk might be considered low by some, the risk is more than not doing a procedure. There are many things that get done out of tradition. My motto is a tradition is an excuse to not do something better.