blueberry varieties

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by januaries, Apr 5, 2005.

  1. januaries

    januaries Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    264
    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2003
    In your opinions, which rabbiteye blueberries are the tastiest? I live in east central Alabama and am trying to decide what varieties to plant. Looking for sweet fruit with thin skins and not too seedy. I've read a lot about blooming dates and chill hours, but I wonder which ones taste the best.
     
  2. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

    Messages:
    4,588
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    The Quiet Corner of CT
    What's a "rabbiteye" blueberry? Is that like a lowbush?
     

  3. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

    Messages:
    2,173
    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location:
    Pell City, AL
    Good questions. I was wondering what a Rabbiteye blueberry plant is also. WalMart has a package of 3 little sticks for $10. A produce stand has nice, two feet tall plants complete with leaves growing in a bag of sawdust for $4.50 each or a bundle of 5 for $15. The Walmart package doesn't say what varieties they are, just that there are "three" varieties for proper polination. The ones from the produce stand are "Rabbiteye" blueberries. I'd like to purchase the bundle of
    5 but I'm wondering if I need several varieties for polination. I've always had very good success with the bagged trees from the produce stand in the past and have recently bought more from here now that we've moved.

    Edited to add:
    I've googled and have answered my questions:

    coming from www.inberry.com


    Rabbiteye Blueberry

    Rabbiteye blueberries (Vacinium ashei) are native to the southern United States. Rabbiteye are generally taller than their northern highbush cousins and are commonly planted on 12 ft. row centers with bushes 5 to 7 feet apart down the row. Although rabbiteye blueberries are recommended for planting in zones 7-9 they have been successfully grown as far north as Kentucky. Two different varieties need to be planted for cross pollination and fruit set. Cultural needs for rabbiteye are similar to highbush.

    Premier--Very large, light blue, high quality fruit is picked during the early rabbiteye season which is late May in northern Florida. The bush will grow to be 6-10 feet tall. Bright green foliage during the summer makes Premier a wonderful ornamental hedge.

    Climax--High yielder of dark blue high quality large berries. Bush is similar in size to Premier but has a more spreading growth habit. Berries tend to ripen uniformly in the early rabbiteye season.
     
  4. Ragamuffin2004

    Ragamuffin2004 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    70
    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2004
    Location:
    Florida
    Bluebell, premier, and baldwin for eating fresh, I think. For jam making, I think mixing the sweet varieties with the tarts makes the best jam. For cross polllination, it is recommended that you have at least 3 varieties.

    I haven't tried snoflake and beckyblue. They are supposed to be really sweet. Don't know about the skins or seeds.
     
  5. suelandress

    suelandress Windy Island Acres Supporter

    Messages:
    4,588
    Joined:
    May 10, 2002
    Location:
    The Quiet Corner of CT
    Daybird...good info, thanks. Wonder why they call it rabbiteye....must be a TALL rabbit :p