blueberries?? - one more time

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by DayBird, Mar 25, 2006.

  1. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    There are tiny little wild blueberry bushes all over the property. I've planted 5 Tiffblue bushes at the top of the hill, in a row, about 8 feet apart. I've also bought 5 Climax bushes but don't want to plant them at the top of the hill. I'd rather plant them, like landscaping bushes, nearer the house at the bottom of the hill. They'll be about 150 feet apart. Is this too far for proper pollination to produce a good crop?
     
  2. woodspirit

    woodspirit Well-Known Member

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    No that's not too far for pollination. More of a concern would be to have varieties that flower at around the same time. There are cultivars of blueberries which are early flowering but late producing and vice-versa. The bees will be attracted to whatever is in flower (nectar) at the time. I'm not sure if honey bees can reach inside a blueberry flower with their tongue or not. I think they are pollinated by bumblebees and other kinds that chew a hole in the side of the flower and get the nectar from the side. Honey bees have very weak chewing mouth parts. However I buy blueberries from places who have bee hives right in the berry patches, and they sell honey produced from those hives.
     

  3. Queen Bee

    Queen Bee Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Honeybees are used as pollinators, on blueberries for commerical uses. But as was mentioned above.. You will need cultivars that bloom at the same time for a good crop. I have been told, that you need at least 3 cultivars and more are even better. This will provide you with a better chance, that at least two are bloom at the same time.

    Then, my dear Godfather as two blueberry bushes that were dug from the base of one tree and his bushes have more berries on them that a family of 25 would need for the yr!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    If you plant your bushes and after the second yr. your production is not good maybe you could add another cultivar. Debbie
     
  4. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Tiffblue and climax are fine for cross-pollination, but 150 feet is too far for good results. You would get a better crop if you interspersed the two varieties at both locations.
     
  5. sue currin

    sue currin Well-Known Member

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    I have blueberries in the woods and want to plant some of them in a field. Can this be done by just diging them up and moving them to another place? They don't get enough sun light to produce many berries where they are and are hard to pick.
     
  6. swamp man

    swamp man Well-Known Member

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    Yep.That should work just fine.I've done the same thing at my place,and have never lost a blueberry bush from transplanting.In fact,my most productive bushes are volunteere that I transplanted.You might want to check out the soil PH in their new spot before ya' move them,though.
    Nick
     
  7. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    Thank you, that's the answer I wanted. :goodjob: I bought the two varieties because they were supposed to be good at pollinating each other. Maybe I'll just place the Climax in a second row at the top of the hill. If I were to plant a third variety, what would you suggest? Zone 7, Alabama.
     
  8. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Any of the rabbiteye varieties will do fine in zone 7. My personal favorite is Baldwin, but I have not been able to locate any in years. Powderblue, Premier, and Brightwell are all excellent varieties. But again, if you're going to plant them a ways from the others, I'd plant two varieties together there, also.
     
  9. btai

    btai Well-Known Member

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    Honeybees pollinate blueberries just fine. The problem occurs when carpenter bees and bumble bees frequent the bushes. They make small holes at the base of the blueberry flowers and take the nectar from the outside. The honeybees eventually learn to use these premade holes and "steal" the nectar without properly pollinating. However with a strong bee presence the young bees haven't learned the trick yet and continue to properly pollinate the blueberries. UGA did a lot of research on the subject and if you google I bet you can find the papers.
     
  10. BillyGoat

    BillyGoat Well-Known Member

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    I just love blueberries and red rasberries too!

    Can these be grown in central Tx. I have never seen them around!

    If so, how long does it take them to start producing after planting small schubs(bushes)?

    I would like to plant some out at the house in the contry that we rent out, we will be moving there in a year +
     
  11. tyusclan

    tyusclan Well-Known Member

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    Central Texas should be zone 8, and the rabbiteye varieties of blueberry will do fine there. As far as raspberries, you're probably too hot there like we are here. I would love to grow some raspberries, but they just won't take the intense heat we have in the summer.