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Discussion Starter #1
Howdy
Think we may get our first smackdown tonight. I have had some unusual success with blue hubbards this year. There's a lot of them and they're pretty durn big but still immature I'm guessing. If we were to get a light frost or even a freeze would that be the end of them? I know how the plant will do (badly) but am unsure of how the big fruits will do. If we get through tonight I think we may have several additional days of more-or-less safe weather and would like to leave them out to take advantage of that. I've committed my floating row, sheets and tarps to trying to keep the peppers afloat - so the big boys are on their own. Same question for my pumpkins. They've put on a burst of growth here at the end but most aren't quite "there". Advice for a blue hubbard newbie?
 

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The plants will bite the dust if they frost, but it prob won't hurt the winter squash unless it gets real cold. You will have to harvest if the plants frost. Do you have any old news papers around? You can spread them out over the squash plants and might save them. I always hate to lose plants to a frost then have a week or longer that they could have finished maturing.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Well, I guess time will tell. These patches are approx 10'x20'~25' with the foliage standing waist high ( :eek: ) which makes any practical attempts to protect them a challenge. As long as the fruits are likely to be undamaged I'll go on gambling. If the plants do get knocked down with a frost will the harvested hubbards tend to mature indoors? I know pumpkins can be forgiving that way.

This hubbard discussion takes my mind off my loaded, a week or two from payday, tomato plants. I need to make a dent in my "green tomato chow-chows" and "green tomato relishes" and "green tomato..." etc. reaching back to 1998 before I put up any more. If you know what I mean. :rolleyes:
 

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I know exactly what you mean.
I usually make too much of one thing and then don't do that one for a couple or three years.
Most of the winter squash are rather forgiving of being picked a little green and will continue to ripen if they are close enough to maturity.

I have decided that it is easier to 'extend the season' at the front end than the back end. If you start a few weeks ahead of usual planting dates using season extenders to warm and protect the little bitty plants, it is easier than covering a
'garden monster' (such as 'the punkin that ate the garden'). I've been gardening for a while in colorado with sometimes less than 2 months frost free growing season. Gonna take some adjusting living in a higher zone.
 
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