Blue Berry plants eaten

Discussion in 'Home Gardens, Market Gardens, and Commercial Crops' started by IAHawkeye, Feb 10, 2017.

  1. IAHawkeye

    IAHawkeye Well-Known Member

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    I was just out feeding the bees and thought I would walk through my orchard and fruit area and check things out. Something, appears to be deer, ate my 8 blueberry plants that I planted last summer clear to the ground!!! They were nice sized $29 plants last year!!! Any chance they will come back?
     
  2. farmrbrown

    farmrbrown nobody

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    Unfortunately, when deer know you have a good breakfast buffet.....yes.
    They WILL come back.

    Unless you meant the blueberry plants.
    I think they are toast.

    If you replant, put up some kind of chicken wire, construction fencing, etc. to keep the freeloaders out of your salad bar.
     

  3. GreenT

    GreenT Member

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    You might also think about planting blackberries, especially the more wild thorny types, they should hold up to the deer much better. I don't have any experience with blueberries but I don't think they have much chance of regrowing from the ground
     
  4. rural dreams

    rural dreams Active Member

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    "Someone" ran the mower over my baby blueberry plants,more than once.They kept trying to regrow,but finally succumbed after a couple years.Yours may come back,I'd leave them be until spring and see what happens.Protected by a cage of some sort,of course.
     
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  5. Solar Geek

    Solar Geek Well-Known Member

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    All 25 of mine eaten to the ground (and they were the cheaper $10 ones) CAME BACK. Now this summer is 3 years and I am likely to get a great crop.

    Water like normal.
     
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  6. GreenT

    GreenT Member

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    Well then maybe there is hope! It might be a good idea to compare blueberry plants based on their variety, age, pot size, etc. instead of how much you paid for each one...
     
  7. IAHawkeye

    IAHawkeye Well-Known Member

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    I should have stated that they were large, 4 gallon potted, plants, that is why they were more expensive. Usually I go with smaller, cheaper, but I wanted these to get a great start and they were doing great.
     
  8. IAHawkeye

    IAHawkeye Well-Known Member

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    Thanks everyone! I will leave them in the ground and try to protect better around them.
     
  9. geo in mi

    geo in mi Well-Known Member Supporter

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    They should come back as branches, as well as several more canes from the crown itself. They will all grow upward at the same speed(providing they don't get eaten again)and will compete for the same sunlight. You will have to prune out those in the center, early, by about three years, in order to open up the crown. If you don't, those on the outside edges will get smaller berries. Just keep an eye on them. Oh, you should also consider rabbits and make protection accordingly--small wire openings...

    geo
     
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  10. chaossmurf

    chaossmurf Well-Known Member

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    snares for the rabbits ? crossbow for the deer ? meat for the freezer :)
     
  11. COSunflower

    COSunflower Country Girl Supporter

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    The same thing happened to my blueberries the first year - deer :( They did come back but have never been as robust as in the beginning.
     
  12. krackin

    krackin Well-Known Member

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    Whitetails will mow brambles and strawberry plants too.
     
  13. IAHawkeye

    IAHawkeye Well-Known Member

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    Well, I know some of you have been anxiously awaiting the outcome...haha All but one are starting to come back! They have a long way to go to get back to where they were but at least they may make it.
     
  14. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Make some cages to go around them until they get some size.
     
  15. IAHawkeye

    IAHawkeye Well-Known Member

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    Some of my new berry beds!! Putting all new plants into these this year. I planted honey berries, raspberries, black berries, and strawberries tonight. I will add netting to these as well. Trying to build better protection for established plants as well. Berry Bed.JPG Strawberry bed.JPG
     
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  16. krackin

    krackin Well-Known Member

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    I found cedar waxwings raised the devil with strawberries. Robins and wild turkeys seem to be the worst on my blueberries.

    Last year the neighbors were the worst. One would think they would ask first. There are a lot of wild low and high bush around here. Some folks just seem to think any the see are theirs for the taking. Back in the day, we asked permission regardless.
     
  17. FCLady

    FCLady Well-Known Member

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    I saw this and had an "oh yah" moment.
    We moved all our "berries" to one area, bought a car canopy frame (we can add on if needed easily) and we're in the process of fencing the entire thing in.
    Railroad ties frame the bottom edge. We're using 1/2 inch vinyl-coated fencing all along the bottom/side areas and topping with netting that can be removed/added seasonally. Snow is too heavy on the top netting; we don't want it to collapse, so we'll removed the top netting every fall. Leaving the fenced sides to protect from deer/sheep wandering around. Netting at the top keep the birds out when the berries are ripe.
     

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