Blossom End Rot on Tomatoes

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by ravenstark, Apr 28, 2005.

  1. ravenstark

    ravenstark Member

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    I'm pretty sure my tomatoes are getting blossom end rot, the bottom half of the immature fruits are turning black. So far, only the smallest tomatoes on the ends of each bracket(???)/brace/cluster/group are affected.

    This year I used 120 pounds of dolimitic lime on the 30'x90' plot, hopeing it would prevent this problem. That was the rate suggested on the bag for my soil conditions to bring my pH to 6.6. The water is also extremely hard so I was hoping that would help. Now that the plants are in the ground, is there anything I can do to get calcium to them ASAP? Could the rot be from something other than lack of calcium?
     
  2. kathy H

    kathy H kathyh

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    There is a spray most nurserys carry that stops it. you just spray it on the Tomato.
     

  3. swamp_deb

    swamp_deb Well-Known Member

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    Bought my spray at wallyworld, it does wonders.

    When did you put out your lime? I think that I need to put it out in Jan or Feb for planting here, I never remember to put it out at the right time. I just add with the regular fertilizer then spray if needed.
     
  4. brosil

    brosil Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I've also heard that irregular water supply will cause it and now that I heavily mulch my tomatoes, I don't seem to have it.
     
  5. Windy in Kansas

    Windy in Kansas In Remembrance

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    When it comes to tomatoes and blossom end rot, is there any resistance bred into hybrids that heirloom varieties don't have? I don't know and am asking.
     
  6. A.T. Hagan

    A.T. Hagan Guest

    Keeping the supply of moisture to the plant roots steady and consistent is very important to avoiding blossom end rot.

    Is your garden soil soggy? Really dry? Swinging from one to the other?

    I've found a good mulch usually eliminates the problem for me.

    .....Alan.
     
  7. bridget

    bridget Well-Known Member

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    What's the name of the wallyworld stuff?
     
  8. Phantomfyre

    Phantomfyre Black Cat Farm Supporter

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    As others have said, lack of calcium and irregular watering is what causes it. You've covered the calcium thing with the lime, but somewhere, sometime back, I collected a little nugget of information about plants requiring magnesium to be able to take up calcium. Epsom salts are magnesium sulfate, so watering the 'maters with a solution made with Epsom salts can help provide that element. Worked for me, anyway. (I used crushed eggshells for the calcium, and mulched them heavily to help regulate soil moisture.)

    Hope this helps,
    Diana
     
  9. swamp_deb

    swamp_deb Well-Known Member

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    I'll try to remember to look tomorrow, it is in the shed outside and the mosquitos would eat me up if I went out there tonight.

    I apologize for not checking back sooner.
     
  10. swamp_deb

    swamp_deb Well-Known Member

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    It is called "Yield Booster" by ferti-lome. " 2 Tablespoons makes 1 gallon of spray --- Stops and Prevents blossom end rot caused by calcium deficiency" It is in a brown bottle with 16 ounces. Guaranteed Analysis: Calcium as CA..10%, Chlorine, not more than.....22% Derived from Calcium Chloride 370-0910
    At half strength, during bloom it is used as foliar spray to help set fruitand increase yields
    Bought it several years ago at $3.99.

    Hope this helps and again I apologize for not checking back sooner.
     
  11. bridget

    bridget Well-Known Member

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  12. airotciv

    airotciv Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Phantomfyre you are so right, I work for the County Extention Office here in Oregon. Just to add few things. Calcium and magnesiun can leach out of the soil during heavy rains. These should be put back into the soil pretty much every year. Using eggs shells or oyster shell is a long term fix for calcium, as they take a long time to break down, but are also the best since it takes longer to leach out. We at the office always tell people when planting tomatoes add 1 tablespoon of epson salt in the botton of the planting hole. Also remember to water regular.
     
  13. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    I once cut a blossom-end rot problem short by pouring some extra milk on the tomatoes. I have goats, so had plenty of milk and some had gone bad. The tomatoes loved it, though!
     
  14. bridget

    bridget Well-Known Member

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    Forgive my ignorance :) but how much milk? How often?
     
  15. canadian_grandm

    canadian_grandm New Member

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    Something I've done for years with tomatoes and haven't had a problem with blossom end rot since I started doing it is to add 2 tablespoons of Epsom Salts into the planting hole when planting the plants. Mix it in with the dirt at the bottom of the hole and then plant the tomato. Can also use half that amount (1 tablespoon) for eggplants and pepper plants. The magnesium in the Epsom Salts helps the plant be able to use the calcium.

    When the plants start blooming I add 1 quart of milk per plant. It just gives them extra calcium when they need it most. I usually just use the powdered milk mixed with water.

    We'll be planting about 300 tomato plants this year so I probably won't do this with all of them, but the ones I've done it with have a much better harvest and great tasting tomatoes.

    Diane