Bloody discharge. Concerned.

Discussion in 'Goats' started by LittleGreenBarn, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. LittleGreenBarn

    LittleGreenBarn New Member

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    Hello. I will be contacting a veterinarian about this issue come Monday, [​IMG]that has just arisen, just wanted to get this down in the forum first before I call. I have a one year old Pygmy/Dwarf that has a blood tinted discharge coming from her vaginal opening. She has been incredibly vocal today and has a gel like discharges as well, so I was thinking she was in estrus.

    I then noticed the blood a few moments ago when I went out. I looked to see if there was an injury to her vulva, but there is not. This must have just started within the last couple hours. It's not a lot, but still, is this normal for a doe in heat?

    *Just also wanted to add that her temp is 103.0. She is eating, drinking, alert and energetic. (had to do some goat wrangling getting her cleaned off)

    I was also thinking possibly a UTI. Any advice is appreciated. This really has me worried.

    P.S. I do not have any bucks, nor have any been on my property, so pregnancy is not at all an option.

    Included a picture for reference.
     
  2. Caprice Acres

    Caprice Acres AKA "mygoat" Staff Member Supporter

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    The picture is very dark and hard to interpret. What I see in the tail and below the vulva does not appear bloody and appears to be normal discharge associated with heat cycles. Especially coupled with her behavior, I would be unconcerned if she were mine.

    A UTI is usually associated with increased urinations, cloudy/discolored (red/pus)/smelly urine. As it ascends towards the kidneys, they may become systemically ill with a fever, inappetence, colic behavior and just plain seem 'sick'. Keep in mind that slightly increased urinations is also a NORMAL behavior during estrus as urine is used to signal readiness to breed and status to herdmates and males. In doe only herds, usually dominant females or other females in heat will mount and allow mounting from other females. Females can also 'act' like males, blubbering, kicking, snorting, doing flehmen with urine from in heat herd mates etc. This is all normal herd behavior.

    UTI's are rare, or perhaps mild and resolve on their own unknown to us. A pyelonephritis (kidney infection) is a severe urinary tract infection and would likely need treatment. Both are usually associated most with recent birth, or poor vulvar/anal conformation. Thankfully goat feces is also pelleted, which makes it harder for the vaginal vault to become contaminated with feces unlike cattle and horses which when coupled with poor vulvar/anal conformation, can be prone to both vaginitis/metritis as well as UTI's.

    If the 103* was taken after you had to 'wrangle' her, I would be unconcerned with that temperature. Normal is usually on up to 103.5*. Excellent job providing a temp, it's an often overlooked but GREAT tool for understanding the health of animals! :)

    Having a vet out is never a bad thing. They're a wealth of information, and having a good relationship with a vet can make emergencies less scary and also with a valid Veterinary-Client-Patient relationship (VCPR), you can access needed supplies should you need something in the next year. (most vets require seeing your farm/animals within a year as required by law to practice medicine).
     

  3. LittleGreenBarn

    LittleGreenBarn New Member

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    [​IMG]

    Here is a picture that I took yesterday on my phone that is better quality. Thank you, this is the best response I've gotten from most sources thus far. After washing her off, I haven't seen any reoccurring issue. I do have a dominant doe in my herd that acts in the way you mentioned. I am keeping a close eye on her as all my goats are my babies.

    I was unable to get the vet out on a Saturday, but Monday she can come out if the problem persists. Thank you so much.
     
  4. LittleGreenBarn

    LittleGreenBarn New Member

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    The discharge was an orange reddish brown.
    Also there was no noticeable odor.