Bloodroot

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by bethlaf, Apr 6, 2005.

  1. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

    Messages:
    747
    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    N.Ar
    Bloodroot sells for between $12-20 a lb dried, but does anyone know where I can sell it????? I cant find a buyers list anywhere...........
     
  2. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas

  3. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

    Messages:
    747
    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    N.Ar
    yeah, well we are certified naturally grown , and its wildcrafted from our isolated 80 acres of woods
     
  4. HarleysMom

    HarleysMom Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    158
    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2004
    I have bought it from Bear Creek Herbs in Silver City, NM 505-388-5035
    They told me they get their herbs from many sources.
     
  5. Haggis

    Haggis MacCurmudgeon

    Messages:
    2,246
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2004
    Location:
    Northeastern Minnesota
    Many years ago I used to sell it to fur buyers. Some of them bought furs in season and roots, barks, and herbs at other times. The most I ever got for a pound of bloodroot was $3 a pound, but then it easy to find and dig some places.

    Herself and I would dig it in the spring among the trilliums. That stuff will come right up through the snow!!
     
  6. southerngurl

    southerngurl le person Supporter

    Messages:
    6,244
    Joined:
    May 11, 2003
    Location:
    Arkansas
    Oh, Certified Naturally Grown! Cool! You are one of the two in Arkansas, huh?! We would be interested in the blood root in the future, but we do not need any at the moment. It goes into our detox formula.

    You might contact www.mountainroseherbs.com and see if they are interested. They do not currently have bloodroot for sale on their site. They do have bloodroot in a couple of their formulas.
     
  7. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

    Messages:
    747
    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    N.Ar
    yep , we are the only one on here , and only one of the two in ark , the other folks are neat people too , shes a CNM, nice gal, forgot her first name,
    i have contacted the mountain rose people, just lookign for a market is all , attra swears by all this stuff and told us oh theres a goldmine here, but thenwhen you say , well who can we sell it to, they gave me a blank look like, ummmm... theres a silly question :D
    ill keep you in mind though ok , i have other wild medicianals growing like crazy here
     
  8. healing herbals

    healing herbals Pam in OK

    Messages:
    132
    Joined:
    May 20, 2003
    Location:
    OK
    First you need to know the latin name, because with my dealings with herbs, I have found that different tribes call different roots bloodroot. If you aren't sure, post a picture and we will try to figure it out. (whole plant and a root)
    http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/b/bloodr59.html; Sanguinara canandensis, which is what I have used, but I was told by 1 medicine man that what he called blood root was different.
    Ameriherb buys from foragers. Herbalcom buys from Ameriherb.
    Let me think about it, and I will come up with some more names of potential buyers.
    Ameriherb (1-800-267-6141)
    Also, if you can find someone who has booths at powwows, they might buy from you
     
  9. caballoviejo

    caballoviejo Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    442
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2004
    How much do you have? Big buyers/brokers want to deal with large amounts.
     
  10. kabri

    kabri Almst livin the good life

    Messages:
    1,126
    Joined:
    May 14, 2002
    Location:
    W. Washington State
    I would buy some, but live plants since I want to start growing it here in WA. do you sell the plants as well??????
     
  11. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,026
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2002
    Location:
    WV
    Bloodroot (Sanguinara canandensis) is an endangered plant in many areas of the US. And especially in the Appalachians, where I live.

    Read more about "at risk" and "threatened" plants at unitedplantsavers.org

    Read their article on "What you can do to help save medicinal plants" here:http://unitedplantsavers.org/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=63

    Personally, I use other effective herbs that are more plentiful when an endangered herb is called for- and I can't find a cultivated source. For example, I won't use slippery elm. That's just my work ethic, can't speak for all herbalists.
     
  12. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

    Messages:
    747
    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    N.Ar
    i understand your decision , however in this case its in an area we are clearing for pasture, bloodroot doesnt make good forb for the goats or horses, so i think its a logical chice, as an avid wildcrafter i am not about to over harvest my own property , much less anyone elses,
    i think responsible harvesting has its place, since bloodroot, like many other plants needs heavy shade to grow, and we have laready cleared much of the trees from the area, its only a matter of time before the bloodroot would die , so logically speaking , harvesting it at this point is better than letting it die, mature seepods will be harvested , and if i happen to find someplaceo n the property that doesnt have it already growing ill spread them there, but we are literally walking all over it right now .
     
  13. bethlaf

    bethlaf Homegrown Family

    Messages:
    747
    Joined:
    May 26, 2004
    Location:
    N.Ar
    We just arranged to sell 200-300lbs a year to one of the larger herb companies @$19 per pound. Yes we have that much and more.............






     
  14. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,026
    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2002
    Location:
    WV
    Beth--I'm glad you made such suitable arrangements to deal with the resources that you would be otherwise 'wasting'. And profitable as well.

    The unfortunate thing is that so many foragers don't really think as clearly as you do about preserving any property--their own included. Many WV areas are stripped of these plants and others due to poor foraging for cash, as well as overpopulation of deer (ginseng has been decimated). So I am pretty passionate about it.