Blood in milk

Discussion in 'Goats' started by tioga12, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. tioga12

    tioga12 Well-Known Member

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    This is day 3 to be milking my new does, and this morning Classy had one teat clogged with a blood clot followed by pink tinged milk and more bright red shreds of clotting. I was able to milk her out and came across an occasional dark clot which would more or less have to be forced out. I am sure this is because I have been used to milking a goat with small teats (I acquired my first milker 3 weeks ago). My new goats have very large teats and it is another learning experience. I must have injured a blood vessel. :help: I feel very badly about this-I was being so careful, and was afraid this would happen. Her appetite is fine, her udder feels normal; I am afraid it will develop mastitis. I was wondering it anyone else has experienced this. I have been researching a bit and tend to think the following quote makes sense:

    Q: What causes blood in milk and how do we treat this problem? Is this any danger to the calf?

    A: Cows sometimes rupture a blood vessel in the udder due to trauma or a weak vessel wall. The presence of blood (pink milk) or blood clots in milk is usually temporary and treatment is rarely necessary. The presence of the blood in milk is not a problem to the calf.

    Blood makes milk more nutrient-rich for bacteria, therefore cows with blood in their milk may be at greater risk for infection in the udder (mastitis). However, I do not recommend treating a quarter with blood in the milk unless there is already evidence of mastitis, because it is as likely that you will carry bacteria into the gland with the treatment. Mastitis is evidenced by a hot, hard, swollen quarter; watery or otherwise abnormal milk; and possibly a fever in the cow.


    Dr. David Smith, Associate Professor
    Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska - Lincoln, Lincoln, NE
    February 13th, 2006

    So what SHOULD I do? Maybe frequently milk her very gently? I checked out the alternative treatment on Fias co farms site-(for mastitis), herbals and oils...that sounds ok, but will have to order the stuff and wait for it to be delivered...

    Please help!!!
     
  2. tioga12

    tioga12 Well-Known Member

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    I have consulted with the previous owner and she recommended keeping a good watch on it and seeing if it will heal on its own. If signs of mastitis develop we have Today available to use.
     

  3. Simpler1773

    Simpler1773 Well-Known Member

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    Hi Annette,

    I had no answers for you but just wanted to thank you for posting this, as I will be getting my first milkers sometime next week and it always good to know these types of things... keep us posted :)

    Ricki
     
  4. tioga12

    tioga12 Well-Known Member

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    I just put her out on the stand to have a look at her and milked out about a cup to evaluate things a bit. Absolutely no clots or even flecks, and she it perfectly normal. I strained it and we decided it was slightly pink tinged, but I am feeling very relieved already. Don't know what happened that it was so bad this morning.
     
  5. Simpler1773

    Simpler1773 Well-Known Member

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    Glad to hear it was just minor and she's better!

    Ricki
     
  6. tioga12

    tioga12 Well-Known Member

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    Well, today the milk looks normal, but there is an area that feels bruised on part of the udder. I think maybe she was injured by one of the other goats after all. :( She doesn't seem to be uncomfortable and is eating well.