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Discussion Starter #1
I finally made blender soap today. I used an old blender that wasn't much good; so I won't have to worry about cross contamination. I used throw-away plastic cups to measure my ingredients on my scale; and an old jelly jar to dissolve the lye with the water. Several years ago I had purchased individual plastic soap molds from Hobby Lobby. The recipe made about six bars of soap. This is the recipe I used:

6 oz coconut oil
8 oz palm oil
2 oz olive oil
2.4 oz lye
6.4 oz water
1 tsp. lavender essential oil
This soap turned out to be a lovely creamy white color. I can't wait until 3 weeks is up to try it.
This was a very easy way to make soap. I did use goggles along with my glasses as a safety precaution. I just followed the directions on the following website. I am melting some beef tallow in an old crockpot. I am going to try making soap with that next time.

Go to this website for free blender soap recipes:
http://www.colebrothers.com/soapcalc/free.html

Instructions with pictures can be found here:
http://www.colebrothers.com/soap/blender.html
 

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Discussion Starter #3
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I unmolded my first batch of soap today; and it looks and smells great. I made another batch with beef tallow. It is a very simple recipe; but takes longer to trace and it doesn't smell as nice:

16 oz. melted beef tallow, cooled to room temp or just liquid stage
2.2 oz lye
3/4 cup water

Dissolve lye in cool water, stir carefully to dissolve and let set until water clears.
Put melted tallow in blender jar and carefully pour in lye water. Put lid firmly on blender jar and cover jar with old tea towel. Turn blender on low speed and run until at thin trace stage. I added rosemary essential oil at this point and turned the blender on again until just mixed. Pour into molds and cover with waxed paper and then two folded bath towels. Let set, covered for 24 hours and unmold. Soap can be used in 3 weeks.

Note: Please use precautionary measure such as goggles and rubber gloves. Don't open the blender lid until the soap has burbed, (air bubbles will cause the soap to make a burbing action). This might get in eyes or on skin if the blender is opened before the soap burps.
 

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WOW! Thanks linn. I haven't tried my first batch of soap yet. Still collecting and comparing receipes. This is probably the one I will finally try. I love the fact that they make such small batches. I know I can only push so many of my experiments onto family and friends.
 

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Debbie
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Sounds like your hooked!!! :) Me too!!

Lard makes a very nice soap too....... I never use beef tallow before, what did it smell like?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It doesn't smell bad after I added the essential oil Next time I am going to put some potato peelings in the tallow when I render it. That is supposed to help clarify it. I think the longer it ages, the better it will smell. It smells better today than it did when I first made it.
 

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word of caution. When making soap batches using only 1 lb of oils, it is best to have an electronic scale to measure in grams instead of oz.

With the first recipe listed, 2.34 oz lye is a 5% superfat and 2.46 lye oz is 0% superfat and using 2.5 oz of lye is 1.5% lye heavy.

That same recipe in grams:

Palm: 226.8 gr
Coconut: 170.1 gr
Olive: 56.7 gr
Lye: 68.04

Personally, I'd decrease the water amount from 6.4 oz to 5.3 oz (or 150.26 gr)

It is ALWAYS wise to recalculate your lye on any and every soap recipe you get from the internet with a reputable lye calculator.

Have fun!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the advice. After checking the amounts on a couple of different lye calculators, I see what you mean. The tallow soap will probably have to be used for the laundry. :Bawling:
I wish I had used the lye calculator before making my soap. I just made my fourth batch. I think it may be too heavy on the lye too. It had milk in it.
 

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Have you tongue tested them to see if they are lye heavy? Wet your finger and rub it on the soap, then touch your finger to your tongue. If you get a zap, like sticking your tongue on a 9 volt battery then they are lye heavy. If they just taste like soap then they are fine. They may not be as mild and might leave you pretty squeaky clean, but they aren't dangerous. If they are lye heavy you could rebatch them.
 

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Lynn,
when working with animal oils (tallow, lard, emu, ostrich, mink, et al) keep your heat very low. Turn off the heat before oil is fully melted. If you heat your oils too much, you'll develop an odor (that will eventually go away) and you'll also burn off beneficial qualities of the oils.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hovey Hollow said:
Have you tongue tested them to see if they are lye heavy? Wet your finger and rub it on the soap, then touch your finger to your tongue. If you get a zap, like sticking your tongue on a 9 volt battery then they are lye heavy. If they just taste like soap then they are fine. They may not be as mild and might leave you pretty squeaky clean, but they aren't dangerous. If they are lye heavy you could rebatch them.
Thanks for the good tip. I tested my first three batches and all I got was a soapy taste; I didn't get a zap. I don't feel so bad now. I was afraid I wasn't going to be able to use my soap. All advise is greatly appreciated; as I am just a novice.
 
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