Black plastic pipe

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Farmer Willy, Oct 27, 2005.

  1. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Has anyone here worked with the black water pipe (pex or pvc??) sold at tractor supply, Lowes, ect. It's rated for cold water only. I think they use barbed fittings and stainless steel clamps to make the connections, not solvent/glue. How well does it hold underground? I need to get water line in before cold gets here.
     
  2. Jim-mi

    Jim-mi Well-Known Member

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    Yup The line I put in 8 ? years ago is working just fine. I seem to recall that there was some plastic barbed fittings as well as the metal. I'd suggest not to use the plastic fittings.
    And crank that SS clamp as tight as you can. Know you "frost line" and trench deep enough.
    That stuff works just fine (black pvc)
     

  3. emke

    emke Well-Known Member

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    DH ran some from our pump house to where the animal pens are. He stopped in the middle to put in a pipe for a faucet at the garden, then went on from there. We have never had a problem with it. Not sure how he did it, but he was able to come off the black pipe and use PVC fittings to have a taller water line for the animal pens. I'm sure you could ask at Lowe's, The Home Depot, or even a hardware store and they could tell you how to make the connections to regular PVC pipe, or whatever type you are going to use.
     
  4. longrider

    longrider Southern Gent

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    my oh my yes i have laid miles of the stuff in my younger years. keep it wrapped up tight about the freeze line and it will serve you well. we run it all over the pasture and woods. to water horses and cattle. not to mention hydratin wassermelons and the like.

    i like it because you can bend it run over a time or two and it usually doesnt leak. not near as timid as common pvc used in houses today. thats it main attribute. no glue, just SS hose clamps and your good to go.

    be smart and bury it deep and support it well when it comes out of the ground. if you let hooves on it or tires run over it then it wont be long before it will leak. it bends well but flattens quickly, so mind your pipes.
     
  5. Whitepine

    Whitepine Member

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    This pipe works great as stated put below the frostline. If the water has iron or sulfer in it use the plastic fittings. Hard water will eat metal ones up. This is a fact. Litely heat the connections before clamping and they will be fine. Over doing the clamps will cause more headaches than anything else.
     
  6. cowboy joe

    cowboy joe Hired Hand

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    Used this on many underground installs. The oldest one is over 12 years and hasn't had any problems. I've never used the metal connectors. Always used the plastic, barbed fittings for the end connections. Here's what I have learned:

    1. Make sure that you are below the frost line. A frozen line will swell & split very easy.

    2. The pipe is rolled when you get it. Make sure that you let the line uncurl in the sun or at least make sure that the ends are fairly secure. The plastic fittings are not the best in the world. Angled stress from the curl could cause them to weep.

    3. I prefer to use two, stainless steel clamps over each barbed fitting, one behind the other. Cost me another $0.50 per connection but it beats having to dig up a line to fix a leak. Like I said, the plastic fittings are not the best in the world.

    Good luck.
     
  7. michiganfarmer

    michiganfarmer Max Supporter

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    yup, cold water is fine. I was told not to use it for the hot water from my outdoor wood furnace, but I tried it anyway. Bad idea. The hose held up ok although it did get very soft, but the barbbed conectors got soft enough that my splices kept comming apart. I finally bought the type of tubing made for hot water
     
  8. sidepasser

    sidepasser Well-Known Member

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    We use it down here in the south too. I ran lines to all the horse pens and buried them two feet deep (that's all that we need down here). I laid down old straw, then put the pipe on top of that and covered it with a layer of straw and then packed the dirt on. Used the freezeless water faucets and this whole system works great and has never leaked. Used the metal fittings though, kinda scared that plastic would get brittle over time (might not but I didn't want to take a chance!).

    Love that piping and it's cheap by the roll.

    Sidepasser
     
  9. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    The black roll plastic is sold in different pressure rating. Make certain to get the 180 PSI rated or higher if available. My preference is for the rigid schedule 40 PVC.
     
  10. Pete

    Pete Solar Powered Aussie

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    I plumbed the whole house with it, except for the hot water lines, and it has worked well for the 18 years since. The (3/4" in my case) pvc fittings are no problem in areas where it doesn't freeze, and will hold up under 40psi pressure. Far better to use a fitting without glue where potable water is involved, of course.
    I use it for irrigation as well, pumping from two 12 volt solar-powered pumps.
     
  11. rambler

    rambler Well-Known Member Supporter

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    _That_ explains it. All the plumbing I do is several 100 feet to 500 feet from one building to the other, in a 5-6 food deep trench for frost. Rolling out the good quality black plastic on the 100 or 250 foot roll is by far easier than gluing up little pipe sections, with all those chances for leaks at the joints & dirt falling in the glue. Never understood people suggesting PVC for such things, but you are doing something different entirely.

    --->Paul
     
  12. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Why would you have dirt in the joints, just glue the pipe above ground and then put it in the trench.

    I don't know the difference in price between the black plastic and PVC but I do know what a PIA it is to redig up a failed pipe. I have always used PVC for my outdoor underground runs.
     
  13. Farmer Willy

    Farmer Willy Well-Known Member Supporter

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    No, I won't use pvc for 300' run of pipe--just too many joints in a run that long, I save pvc for my building plumbing, copper for building supply lines. I just wasn't sure how well the ss clamps and barbed fittings held over time. My hope is IF I get a line leak it will either be were the hydrant is located or in a shutoff valve box I install behind the house. If is leaks under the house it is at least accesible under the crawl space without digging. Hurry up payday, Willy needs pipe and a trencher and it's getting colder down here. Burrhhh.