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Can someone please tell me if a mini rex rabbit would start biting if she were pregnant?We put her in her own hutch because she should be due the 15th.My daughter reached in to get her food and water bowl to refill and she growled and bit her good!
We have only had her for a couple weeks now,but she hasn't shown any aggresion untill today.We also are completely new to having rabbits.
Any thoughts would be great.
Thanks,
 

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Are you sure of the breeding date?? she might just be terrified and unsure of her surroundings ,and this was a fluke as she was scared.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
She was with the male on May 17th and 18th.The lady that gave her to my daughter said she was bred,we didn't see it.Would the date make a difference?
We did move her from a large outside pen we have the others in,to a smaller hutch ,still outside,and she can see the others.

james dilley said:
Are you sure of the breeding date?? she might just be terrified and unsure of her surroundings ,and this was a fluke as she was scared.
 

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james dilley said:
Are you sure of the breeding date?? she might just be terrified and unsure of her surroundings ,and this was a fluke as she was scared.
howdy kath...I raise rabbits including rex....yes most does will bite and scratch before,during,and after kindling...this is not to be mean..its a protection act...out of all my does I only have one that will allow me to clean out her cage without attacking while with her litter....most times when the kits are about 4 weeks old and eating on own the mother will calm down....I handle my aggressive does with heavy leather gloves and sometimes use a large stick and tap it on the floor of cage infront of them with one hand and grab them behind the neck with the other to avoid getting bit...move to another cage while cleaning the cage containing the kits...after cleaning i replace the mother in her clean cage....I find it important to pet and handle the mother as much as I can even while being agressive...even if just a little pet with a stick...you must also be careful not to aggrivate her to much as this may make her feel the litter is threated and she may stomp or eat the litter...dont allow your children to tend to the rabbit as long as she is biting and scratching....if the rabbit seems to be very hard to handle put her in a cage with a door on the top...so ya can reach down to get her....less room fer error...rather then placing your hands at her level...also when the kits are born make sure to keep the cage very clean and lots of dry fresh hay to keep them warm...when replacing dirty hay handle the kits as least as possible and make sure you place the fur mom pulled out under and around the kits...if you dont do it right mom will fix it....if these kits are outdoors mom may uncover them in the heat...let it be ...mom knows best....ya may also see lots of bald spots on the mother....this is normal due to hair pulling...it will grow back...if you have the problem of her still pulling hair after the kits are sold...givin away..so on.....remove the nest box and place nothing in the cage with her besides food and water for a few days....this will dicourage her from pulling hair......good luck....dale anne
 

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I would not tolerate a nasty, biting rabbit PERIOD. They will pass this tendency on to their young also and if you are planning on keeping breeding stock from her you will end up with a bunch of nast rabbits.


If it was me, I would let her have the litter and if she was still aggresive after kindling she would raise the kits up to weaning and the doe would be culled. Not a trait you want. Kits would not be saved either for breeding stock.

There are to many nice rabbits out there. Why feed a awful one?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you very much for the info,I hope it is because of pregnancy,my kids really like her.
Tracy,my daughter said the same thing you did! If she stays that way,shes gone!!
 

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I ditto what Tracy said! get rid of it!

She under no circumstances should bite. There are so many wonderful rabbits that make wonderful pets..why keep one that isn't nice. I know getting rid of your rabbit sounds very cruel and heartless but less cruel and heartless then having it bite a child!

I have 60 does and you can reach into anyone of their cages at any time and do what ever is needed to be done..including picking up minute old kits, without fear of an aggressive doe or buck.

I raise Rex, Satins, New Zealands and Jesery Woolys. Aggression is a trait passed on.
 
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