birds in shed

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Jim Bunton, May 11, 2004.

  1. Jim Bunton

    Jim Bunton Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I have a 35 X 65 tin shed. It is old but very functional I keep my work vehicles in it and lots of other things. My problem is the birds. They cover everything in droppings. Any one have a way to discourage them from living in the shed? sealing the shed to keep them out doesn't seem feasable.

    Jim Bunton
     
  2. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    You might try rubber snakes or a plastic owl. I have some friends that use the owls to keep the birds away from their moored sailboats.
     

  3. MomInGa

    MomInGa Well-Known Member

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    There are a few tricks you might want to try.
    Placing a rubber snake near where they are nesting may help. Snakes are natural predators and of course, the birds dont want them near.
    You can also cut out a paper Raptor (bird of prey). This too often frightens them and helps keep them away.
    Things such as this can help. You can use blinking lights (like christmas lights) strung around roof of shed, or a scarecrow, or noise (like a radio) sometimes works.
    Sometimes something as simple as hanging a pie pan that can move with the breeze, etc, will work.
    good luck :)
     
  4. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Strips of twisted mylar (like the balloons) hung from the open end of the shed might help. And find a large white ball of some kind, and paint big "owl" eyes on it. Hang so it's looking at the birds. There is a website that sells this stuff; I'll post it if I can find it.
     
  5. figmus

    figmus Member

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    Hang plastic cd's. The light reflects off the disc scaring the birds. How about a cat?
     
  6. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Block off the perch areas with hardware cloth, they won't land where there is no perch. Smoke also sends them fleeing.
     
  7. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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  8. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You didn't mention what kind of bird you have. Its important. If they are swallows, you are not allowed to even harass them!!(Federal Law) If they are migratory, you can harass them, but you need a permit to do more. (International Treaty) If they are nuisance birds you may do anything. You can shoot them if it is legal to discharge the weapon. Nuisance birds usually include pigeons, sparrows, starlings, crows, & magpies. It may differ from area to area.

    Almost all deterents are a waste of money. None are fool proof. All have only marginal success. I like the CD suggestion; use those free aol disks. I have pictures of rubber snakes and owls completely buried in bird poop.

    Your best bet for long term success is to take on the project of making the structure bird proof. Close up all the gaps, or live with the birds.

    I'm guessing the tin roof is corrugated, perhaps even the sides. Working from the outside may be the easier approach. You'll have to eliminate all the little gaps. A sparrow can and will go through a hole the size of a quarter to get to her nest. Hardware cloth may be the easiest to attach. If you bend it 90 degrees, you could shape it to the corrugations and use self tapping screws to attach it.

    Protect yourself from breathing bird droppings. They contain many disease organisms. You can wet the droppings with a good disenfectant, but old caked droppings won't soak through, so you'll need a good full face mask when you clean it up. (your eyes are an exposure point as well as your lungs).
     
  9. MomInGa

    MomInGa Well-Known Member

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    sorry, but no, not exactly right on that gobug.
    Crows, and Magpies are protected as well as most Sparrows. Not only are they protected, but it is a federal offense.

    The three species here that are not protected in the wild in North America are pigeons, starlings and house sparrows. The reason is they were introduced here and are not true natives.
     
  10. MomInGa

    MomInGa Well-Known Member

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    Sorry gobug, I dont mean to look like Im picking on you, but let me offer some things here.
    (I worked with Federal Law Enforcement for 7 years in GA, as both a State and Federal Liscense Wildlife Rehabilitator. I was a private rehabber and one of the most noted in the state at that time as far as birds go.)
    This is just one of the few subjects I actually have a great deal of knowledge on, so please dont take offense.

    " If they are migratory, you can harass them, but you need a permit to do more."

    No. He can certainly hang something to try to keep them out of the shed. If they are roosting on a nest, it is better to leave them alone until they are through raising the clutch.
    Even Law Enforcement though, doesnt go and harrass or destroy. Sometimes birds are relocated, but only if there is no option and only under the supervision of Law Enforcement or Federal Liscense Rehabbers. (Vets and State Rehabbers cant do this with migratory)

    He cant legally shoot any protected species of birds here, except pigeons, starling and house sparrows, which are not protected under the Migratory Act.
    This does not change from state to state and is covered by Federal.

    (note, am not talking about Migratory bird hunting regulations, which is a whole other subject)


    Back to the original problem... Keeping them out of the shed is super or creating an environment in the shed so they dont want to be there, is also good.
     
  11. trtalbott

    trtalbott Well-Known Member

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    There's something you can get at home building centers that you put on your rafters to discourage them from setting down. I don't know how much they are, or if they even work. They are kinda "v" shaped, and fit right on to the 2x.
     
  12. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Strange argument, we probably both agree to not kill birds. As an exterminator, I do install netting and such, but stay far away from harming birds.

    Crows and Magpies are considered nuisance birds in CO. In 15 years I have never had a call to get rid of them, though. Flicker woodpeckers are usually migratory, but they are also considered a nuisance. One must apply for a permit to damage them, but its just a formality. I can agree on the pigeons, starlings, and sparrows, if you mean the English Sparrow when you say the house sparrow.
     
  13. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Mom,
    When I used the word "harass," it was probably a bad choice. I group rubber snakes, plastic owls, scare eye balloons, mylar thingys, octopus rotating devices, motion detector sprinkler systems, electric repellers, electronic repellers, sound repellers, and flailing your arms as forms of harassment.

    In Boulder CO, you cannot speak unkindly of or even think bad thoughts about pigeons.
     
  14. MomInGa

    MomInGa Well-Known Member

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    Ah, no argument gobug. :) I was not real clear on trying to type my comments. (bit tired and to be honest, I usually hate talking about birds... left over burn out from the wildlife work, and I try to normally stay out of bird topics)

    Lets see if I can do a bit better...

    Federal law does allow people to protect themselves and their property from damage that may be caused by birds. This does not normally include though, capturing them or killing them.
    You can scare them off, chase them away, that sort of thing.
    There are some birds that can be killed, but there are such specifics on this and regulations, and most of the time, it has more to do with agriculture or airports, that sort of thing. I am sure too that there are variables in some states.
    There are some specifics about nusiance species as you were saying, that can over-see the need for permits, etc.
    But since you deal with the Federal Wildlife Laws in your work, you know how hard that is to discuss this all in something like a forum. You get into the topics of destruction of trees, crops, which species, etc and get all dizzy. :) Least I do.
    I guess the best thing would be for folks to check with their states DNR and ask about the Animal Damage Control Act or specifics dealing with nuisance species, if they were having that much of a problem.
    It just gets so complicated in ways.

    Oh and yes, house sparrow and English sparrow are the same. :)

    Oh and i need to try that "mylar thingys" one. (laughed when read word thingys)

    Shame about the pigeons there. I honestly dislike wild pigeons a great deal. So many risks.
     
  15. gobug

    gobug Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think we are on the same page.

    1. Check with local authorities to learn of regulations; its just a phone call.

    2. Fix the structure instead of harming the birds.