birds eye peppers

Discussion in 'Gardening & Plant Propagation' started by kentuckyhippie, Nov 29, 2004.

  1. kentuckyhippie

    kentuckyhippie Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,282
    Joined:
    May 28, 2004
    did anyone here grow birds eye peppers? they are a little triangle shaped pepper about half an inch long, bright red when they are ripe and hotter than blue blazes. my friend helped me clean house the other day and threw my saved seeds away because she didn't know what they were. I haven't been able to find any in any of the seed catalogs so if anyone has seed or knows where I can get some, please let me know. thanks
     
  2. WV Rebel

    WV Rebel Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Location:
    Zone 7

    I haven’t found you any seed but they seem to be from Monroe County, Mississippi.

    BUT... if you want some HOT, HOT, HOT seed, read below. The red Savinas are much, much hotter than the Bird’s Eyes but there is a hotter one called the Tezpur. 885,000 Scoville units out of possibly 16,000,000. The Bird’s Eyes are only 100,000 - 225,000.

    Hope this helps you.


    Red Savina Habanero (C. chinense) 350,000 ~ 577,000

    http://www.floresflowers.com/opera/Peppers.html

    Hottest chillie on earth?

    In August 2000, Indian scientists reported on a new chillie cultivar grown in the hills near the Central Assamese town of Tezpur (Capsicum frutescens cv. Nagahari). This chillie variety has beed dubbed Tezpur chili, naga jolokia "chillie of the Nagas" (the Nagas are a people inhabiting the border region between India and Burma, east of Tezpur) and is also sometimes referred to as Indian PC-1.

    This new chillie type is much hotter than the Red Savina Habanero: Its heat was measured to incredible 855000 Scoville units, corresponding to 5.7% of capsaicin in the dried material (4.3% Capsaicin und 1.4% Dihydrocapsaicin; remarkably, other capsaicinoids are missing). There are plans to use this plant in the production of weapons ("pepper spray") for private (anti-mugger defense) and for military (riot control) purposes. It is, however, not stated whether the value cited is typical for the variety, or just a rare exception. (Current Science, 79, 287, 2000; online [PDF])

    In the meantime, the hype around this "Assamese mystery chillie" has faded; in contrast, the work has attracted considerable criticism. The main problem is the lack of proper calibration of their HPLC apparatus; calibration is necessary for getting any absolute values. At the same time, however, the authors used a literature value for the Red Savina that can hardly compared with their relative figures that might easily be off by a factor of two or three. The authors probably had no access to Red Savina chillies, and it is almost impossible to tell what capsaicine content their apparatur would have reported for ed Savinas. As far as I know, authentic naga jolokia material seems never to have appeared outside of India, and thus there are no independent results for it.

    Furthermore, there is a constant nationalistic tone in this paper that destroys the appearance of scientific objectivity (the work was financially supported by the Indian Defence Department). From my personal view, I'd like to add that in this work one paragraph of this very web page appears almost verbatim, without any attribution.
     

  3. WV Rebel

    WV Rebel Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    66
    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2004
    Location:
    Zone 7
  4. kentuckyhippie

    kentuckyhippie Well-Known Member Supporter

    Messages:
    1,282
    Joined:
    May 28, 2004