Bird eggs id.

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Nan(TX), May 24, 2005.

  1. Nan(TX)

    Nan(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Hi all, I need help identifying these eggs. I live in deep East Texas and the nest was about five feet from the ground in a shrub.
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  2. Kathy in MD

    Kathy in MD Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Hi Nan, Sorry I cannot help you, since I live in Maryland I know nothing about Texas birds, but I do have a question. Is that a big piece of plastic in the nest????/
     

  3. Nan(TX)

    Nan(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Sure is. Who knew, that a petroleum product would be good nesting material.
     
  4. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    The birds around here will steal anything for nesting material, including petroleum products. :haha:

    There's a site by Texas A & M which is usually pretty good for identifying critter kinds of things, but I can't find it. The eggs look vaguely familiar to me, but I have no idea what they are. They're pretty, though.
     
  5. uyk7

    uyk7 Well-Known Member

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    Grackle eggs? I have Grackles and below one of the nests was a piece of eggshell that looked like what you have. Any black birds with irridescent (sp?) heads around?
     
  6. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Do you have Cowbirds in your area?

    I save all my plucked chicken feathers in a bag and in the spring when the swallows come back, I take out my bag and start tossing handfulls of feathers in the air. I have thousands of swallows divebombing me for nesting material...it's too cool!

    Different birds use all kinds of manmade nesting material and Cowbirds are opportunists. They are also well known for not building their own nests but co-opting other birds hard earned toils by tossing their eggs out and laying their own for the original parents to hatch and raise.
     
  7. Cyngbaeld

    Cyngbaeld In Remembrance Supporter

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    Look like they might be a wren's eggs. The Carolina wren nests as far west as Texas. But I don't know enough to distinguish the Carolina wren from the house wren. I believe both are protected tho.
     
  8. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    Kim might be onto something here.

    East Texas is within their range. And here's a description of their eggs:

    Their nest however is usually a dome. But maybe it's another type of wren?
     
  9. Nan(TX)

    Nan(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Itsa Cardinalis cardinalis. I just saw mom on the nest.
    This site has everything from egg to chicks.
    Northern Cardinal
    <snip>
    Northern Cardinals build a cup-shaped nest in dense shrubs. They use twigs, leaves, grass, bark strips, roots, weed stems, paper, and hair to build nests. They even use threads from Poison Ivy stems!

    Northern Cardinals lay three or four pale green eggs, with brown spots. The female does most of the incubating (sitting on the eggs), but the male helps when he isn't looking for food. Eggs hatch in about 12 days.
    Once the young cardinals have hatched, the male tends to them while the female begins building a new nest. Northern Cardinals usually have two broods (sets of young) each year.

    http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/StratfordLandingES/Ecology/mpages/northern_cardinal.htm

    But wait; it could be Brown-headed Cowbird.
    <snip>
    The egg of the Brown-headed Cowbird is white, bluish or greenish with a fine speckling of reddish brown.
    http://www.wbu.com/chipperwoods/photos/cowbird.htm

    Looks like I’ll have to wait until they hatch, to know for sure.

    Good grief it looks like a Wrens eggs as well. :bash:
     
  10. countrygrrrl

    countrygrrrl PITA

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    I should have known that. I once stood guard over a cardinal's nest for a couple weeks, although a black snake ended up coiling up and eating the babies. :waa:

    I'm usually somewhat of a pacifist :D but I chopped that snake up with a hoe! The cardinals thanked me for their revenge (they stood by cheering me on, STG!) by making this a permanent home, and I now have chubby little red cardinals everywhere.

    I just love them! :D
     
  11. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Nan, They look like the Sandpiper eggs we had at the old farm.
     
  12. bare

    bare Head Muderator

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    Except Sandpipers lay their eggs in the grass.
     
  13. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    We have some little Cardinal youngin's waiting to hatch in a Lilac bush right outside of our son's bedroom window right now...how cool!
     
  14. MoBarger

    MoBarger Goat's Milk soap for sale

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    Hi Nan -- is the shrub close enough so you can watch it for a bit to see what sort of adults are coming and going? Cardinals are very easy to spot, cowbirds a touch harder since they are not eye opening red but nondescript browns and black.
    If you have wrens you will know it too, not by sight but by their babbling brook of a song. They are a small non-descript bird with an upright tail at an angle much like an OEG.
    http://www.birds.cornell.edu/ has online field guides that are helpful.
     
  15. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    YA,, for the most part. We had one pair lay in the rocks, no grass,, and right in the middle of the horse pasture.
    The other pair, layed their eggs in a nest that was already there and not in use,, and that was low in a bush. Watched them a lot.... such noisey little birds.

    Nan, you need to get a chair, a cool drink, sit and watch from a distance of course,, what comes to the nest!
     
  16. Nan(TX)

    Nan(TX) Well-Known Member

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    I looked last night it was a Cardinal mom on the nest. I'll be on pins and needles until they hatch, then I'll be pacing the floor until they fledge. Twelve days is so fast to hatch, compared with chickens.
     
  17. bergere

    bergere Just living Life

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    Lucky you Nan!! I love Cardinals,, and haven't seen one since we left New England....sigh ~ ~
     
  18. Nan(TX)

    Nan(TX) Well-Known Member

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    They've hatched! At least two have.
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  19. Nan(TX)

    Nan(TX) Well-Known Member

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    The other egg hatched the next day after the first two. Boy howdy what a difference in size a day makes. The first one to hatch was twice the size of the last one. They are already getting wing feathers, sooo cute. Just took these pictures and there eyes are open now.
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  20. VALENT

    VALENT Well-Known Member

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    Good pictures. I hope you keep taking pictures and posting them as they grow. It would be a neat chronolog.