Billy Boer

Discussion in 'Goats' started by GOATDADDY, Feb 27, 2005.

  1. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    I just got back from picking up the billy for my new meat goat herd. He is three years old. Reportedly he was a registered full blood boer that was a herd sire for a man that raised show boers. He was very calm on the 45 minute ride home, I could see him chewing his cud occasionally. I think he weighs close to three hundred pounds. His front hooves are a little long but I will take care of that in a few days after he gets to know and trust me. (probably more like I can trust him) He is huge! I noticed that he seems to have some calluses on his neck and it seems to coincide with where the horns rub when he turns his head. I don't think it is anything to worry about but was wondering if anyone has experience with such a thing. Thanks for any insight you could provide.
     
  2. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    As bucks mature, and remember in Boer this buck is older, they get lots of wrinkles and fat on their neck, which of course they scratch for parasites with their horns. You can tip his horns and then he will never like you again :)

    I wouldn't concern myself with that. Put him into quaranteen, make sure he gets through the move this time of year without shipping fever (runny nose, weeping eyes, cough, pnemonia, fever) worm him, vaccinate him and get those feet pared down. We used a belt sander to address overgrown hooves in our older bucks and in our Boers (who as a breed have the worst feet going). You do not want the parsites in the manure in his feet, or the first 12 hours after worming to go onto the ground where you adults live. He can give all your herd whatever he has, lice, mites, nosebots (why we inject incoming stock with Ivermectin while still in the trailer) hemoncous, or strongied worms that you stock have no immunity to (give Cydectin orally) but the biggy this time of year is shipping fever, you don't want to have to treat a herd for this, you want to treat him. We vaccinate incoming stock for this. Vicki
     

  3. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    Vicki, thanks much for the reply. I will watch him close and treat him as you said. Yes, I do have him in quarantine (I think). He has about a 250 square foot area to himself. One third of which is a little shed. This area is sort of in the middle of a larger area that I have a few sheep and a quarter horse right now. If I worm him now, how long will that soil he is on be contaminated? Is there something I can put on the ground to kill the worms. Are my sheep and horse suseptible to his parasites. I do not have the nannies now, I was pondering going to pick them up today. I have a seperate area for them also with appropriate shelter. Maybe I should waite for a couple of weeks? They are supposed to be two or three year olds that are due in May. I could buy some year or year and a half old, nonpregnant, I believe, for a little less money. What would be your thoughts on that. My idea is to start small and build my herd slowly(more or less) to something that fits with the amount of small acreage I have here.
     
  4. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    I was waiting to see what Vicki said. she is more knowledgable about goats in general than I am. I agree. I think that you don't need to worry about his calluses, as long as the skin doesn't look like it is raw, sore or infected.

    Thanks for the tip of the sander for feet Vicki. I never would have thought of that. My buck has the worst feet. We trim them and trim them. I need something like a sander to keep him straight. When we got him he limped, and the seller told us he didn't know why. He thought maybe the buck had hurt his knee. Well, it was his hoof. It needed trimming badly. He sold this full blood to us for 100.00 because he limped (I saw his foot) As soon as we got his hoof under control and he recovered from all of us messing with him, he walked just fine. He's a great buck. Here's what we did for our boer herd. It was a lot of heavy work, but I believe it helps. My dh and son (who is 6'6 at 240lb) did most of the work though. We live in a place where there is abundant sandstone rock and limestone rock. We have to pick limestone from the pastures so it will make a better hay field and no stone will end up in the equipment. So we start with a garden sized area, buckets in hand, and pick up rocks. Then move to a different garden sized area. We dumped a pickup load around the goat pen so the goats have to walk on them to go backand forth through the gates. (it also keeps the truck from sinking in the mud) And the men picked up some of the large stones around the place and made a goat mountain in the goat pen. Oh, they LOVE to climb on this. I really think that the rock helps groom their hooves. When I check feet, I need to do less trimming than without the rock. These are large rocks mind you. Like the size of a cinder block and larger.
     
  5. Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians

    Vicki McGaugh TX Nubians Well-Known Member

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    From worming until larve and eggs are passed is about 12 hours, why we worm in the trailer (grass hay and water in there) and then let them out. With injectable ivermectin it also gets rid of the lice, nosebots and mites, before they are in the sheds. I would do the same to the lot you are purchasing and then let them into the pasture. No sense quaranteeing him from them, if they are new also :) Make sure there is as little change in feeding as you can if you purchase the bred does. If you can afford the bred does and you are sure they are bred, it is of course the best deal, money back your first year if you have buyers for the kids, it's also a great time to cull moms, poor mothers, poor milkers, mastitis, bad feet.

    You don't have to worry about your horses with the goats, most parasites eaten from goats are rendered sterile in the system of a cow and horse, and few things except CL are zoonic, most things are species specific so horses do not give goats things and vice versa.

    The sheep are a whole nother story. Not only will your following scrapie rules be a nitemare, with everything having to wear tags, but some folks simply won't buy from you with both species in the same area. Your minerals and grain will also be a poor formulation for the goats with the limited copper needs of sheep, and the major copper needs of goats, read the thread on copper right now. Also with sheep having sluggish metabolisims they pick up more parasites than goats and do very poorly with them. During breeding season your rams will breed your does and your buck your ewes giving you nothing but abortions, and also rams and bucks fighting. You may want to rethink the sheep and goats together part.

    Whichever group you purchase really look though them, in groups there is a myriad of problem does thrown in. No swollen knees or hocks or lame goats. Have each doe restrained to go over her, no hard udders. Don't pay extra for goats that are covered, only pay extra for goats who are springing, with udder formation, other than ultrasound or blood tests the only confirmation that a doe is really bred. Vicki
     
  6. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    We've got to follow scrapie rules in Oklahoma anyway, even if we have no sheep. They sell sheep at the same market where we sell goats.
     
  7. hammondfarm

    hammondfarm New Member

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    Vicki,

    Guess you are going to think we are crazy. We purchased 2 boar nannies yesterday. We are going to get Kim (our daughter) to show at the Conroe 4-h show with babies when we breed the nannies.

    I must say I think they are nice.


    Best Regards,
    Julie Hammond
    Hammond Farm
    People Tested Goat Approved, tm
     
  8. GOATDADDY

    GOATDADDY Well-Known Member

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    I went to the coop today and picked up a tube of ivermectin paste that is labeled for a horse. I figure if I can't use it for my billy I will worm my horse, it is about time. The paste is oral. I am very ignorant regarding scrapie rules and what they are in kansas. I have seen some fairly high profile places with goats and sheep living it up together. I would sure be interested to get some good information about this. I found out I can't get my sheep till saturday. Please, pour on the advice about what to look for and I appreciate all the previous comments. My son-in-law and I took a trailer of odds and ends cattle to the sale barn today. One of them was a 2 year old open heifer of mine so I should have a partial payment on the goats. In kansas the sheep and goats are sold at the same facility at the same time, cattle also, anything and everything. At least the one I am familiar with.
     
  9. shorty'smom

    shorty'smom Well-Known Member

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    Here in OK, we have to ear tag all the goats we sell and we have to keep recorsd of where everything came from and where it's been. You can't take a goat to the sale without that tag. It's not that bad really. We went to the cattlemen's meeting a week ago and talked about the pilot program we're running in OK for tagging and tracking cattle. It's going to be a real mess, from the sound of it, but maybe I just haven't gotten up to speed on it yet. Our cattle are permantently identifiable. They are all blanded on the left hip with our registered brand. That's a pretty permanent mark. I guess we'll see what happens when it happens. It's mostly dairy herds that are at risk anyway.
     
  10. MoBarger

    MoBarger Goat's Milk soap for sale

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    Goatdaddy I think you are best off with Ivermectin liquid, like for cattle or sheep. The trick is formulating the dose because goat's metabolism is just so darn high. For the sheep dose you want to do 2x more than label. For cattle I think it is 2x as well.
    One thing you need to worry about and it hasn't been mentioned is cocci. That lives 10-14 days in the soil. Liming your soil helps.
    Where I am I give goat mineral and sheep mineral -- to goats! The sheep mineral has more SE than I can get in mineral around here. It's ok though since I keep some sheep too. ;-)
    I have some pix about maintaining hooves using a palm sander from a talk given by a lady down in your neck of the woods ;-) http://www.roosterhillfarm.com/journal/archives/2004/08/esmgpa_picnic.html

    Enjoy your new buck. I hope you get the papers with him.