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Discussion Starter #1
I don't think he can read the instructions or they are written in Chineese!

Our almost 2 year old herd sire acquired six new yearling does to "take care of" two months ago, but he seems to be totally gutless! He sets around looking like the king and will not even approach one of the new girls unless her head is stuck in the fence! He was very entusiastic over breeding his old girls, but these new ones really seem to have him worried!

He has been with all the does (Boer/crosses) for two months now and I don't think he's even offered the new ones a kiss, unless like I said, their heads are stuck in the fence, and even then it seems as if he isn't really interested in breeding... just pushing them around until they get loose... then he just wanders away like he lost his best friend.

He began to smell when we gave him his old girls back, but even that is beginning to fade now. I'm not terribly concerned about his lack of interest, as I'm sure he'll come around eventually, but has anyone else seen this kind of behaivior in their 2 year old buck?

We were trying to avoid the dreaded January kiddings... but it's not looking good!
 

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It depends on the buck. If they are new, he might be busy establishing a pecking order. Our buck pushes the does around here. He has only bred a couple in plain sight. He is mostly a private type. If there is any breeding going on, I'd bet on it being in the cool of the night, when you aren't around. Write down when you put him in with them and when you take them out and then keep a watchful eye on them. There might be more going on then what you think. If it is as hot there as it is here (near 100 degrees) then he just might not feel like giving the effort or, as suggested, the does aren't cycling right now. Give it time. It is difficult to be patient, isn't it? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
He has taken care of his old girls, almost before they got off the trailer, but hasn't touched his new girls. As a matter of fact, they formed their own herd and are staying separate from the older does. They all are feed together each morning, but as soon as breakfast is over they split up and go their own ways.

Seems a bit odd to me...

Wing
 

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Sounds like high school students!
 

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Green Woman
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They may not LIKE him and have told him so. No, I'm not joking. Give them until the cooler months when they decide they like EVERY buck-man. I had one doe decide she hated the buck and "told" all the rest he was junk.

They all banded together and wouldn't have anything to do with him (he let it be know that his feelings were hurt). The Queen finally decided it was time to be interested and then he was welcomed by the rest of the does as well(they went Ugly Late I guess...)

Do you have any buckrags? That could get them in the mood as well...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I'll tell you the truth, I think it's too late to really worry over it this year (it just surprised me was all), because I can see half the herd kidding in the middle of January just to tic me off!

I like the colder weather, however, I've been through some right tough "first of the year births" from horses (which is why I'm crippled up today) and cattle! The only thing that saved many of the offspring was being right on top of the situation at all times, including having a pretty good idea as to what week they were bred... which is always a guess when it comes to field-breds.

These goats have quite a learning curve that goes along with them, especially when you don't get out/around the way you used to!

One thing that lead me into getting meat goats was the 3 kiddings in two years, that was harped on by the the extension office. Try as we may, the best we have done thus far (6 1/2 years) was a kidding every 10 months by 3 different does. We even pull kids at 10 weeks, so we can build the doe back up a little before breeding back. They just don't start to cycle as quickly as we would like.

The other reason we got goats was for sapling control in the hollows, which they take care of with a vengence, so the goats do have a home based on just that. I'd sure like for them to start paying their feed bill a little better more consistantly however!

Wing
 
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