big truck question

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by scott, Dec 11, 2003.

  1. scott

    scott Well-Known Member

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    We have an old dump truck...a 1965 ford 705 or something like that.... the brakes and steering are shot..... I think I'm money ahead to buy a later model tractor and move the bed and cylinder over to the newer truck.... Do newer trucks have a pto drive off the transmission to run the pump ?????

    thoughts and opinions???
     
  2. dale

    dale Well-Known Member

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    some do or you can get them set up that way. use to drive over the road and we had them put on our trucks because we pulled food grade tankers and hauled corn sweetner and cooking oil
     

  3. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    If you have a manual transmission and there is a 6 or 8 bolt plate on the passenger side, about 6 inches square, there is a pto attachment available for your trans. You can also purchase a hydraulic pump which mounts on the front of the engine and is belt driven. Later model automatic trans do also have a mounting plate.
     
  4. Okie-Dokie

    Okie-Dokie Well-Known Member

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    Going thru this right now with a 1955 Ford F-600. It is a v-8 w/a 16' flatbed dump. Bought it for $500.00 then have been fixing or repairing it daily for a while. Bought 6 brand new tires, new brake shoes, drums, wheel cylinders, master cylinder, brake hoses, brake booster, and check valve for the plumbing from the intake manifold to the brake booster. Lots of work and money, but now it stops on a dime. Repaired radiator & new water hoses, including heater hoses. Converted to 12V alternator and waiting for new fuse block that converts the 12v back to 6V so all the elect. opperated componants (wipers, heater/defroster motor, dash gauges, and so forth won't get fried. The cab, grill, fenders, hood, and so on are a basket case. Looking everywhere for rust free replacements (the sheet metal is too far gone for Bondo). So far I have about $1500 in it and I think a realistic est. of the total will be around $2500. The drive train is in remarkably good shape and I am using it mostly hauling waste material from a ready-mix plant and graveling my drive (approx. 1/2 mile).
    If I would have spent $10,000 for a much newer model I would have had to go thru the same process to make it road ready. Plus, some of the farmers around here are already offering me much more than the total rehab is going to cost. Got some pretty interesting offers to buy already. Over all, the time and cost seems to be worth it. Good luck!
     
  5. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Older gas powered dump trucks are cheap and for a good reason. They are worn out and cost too much to operate. You will be dollars ahead with a later model diesel truck if you plan on doing any hauling. Used day cab road tractors with a lot of life left in them can be purchased very reasonably. You can then stretch the frame and install your dump body.
     
  6. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    You can buy the adaptor that you need form many sources.
    I run an International 4900 series straight truck with a 16 foot dump. This is a salvage truck bought for $8000 from an insurance company and has the diesel engine and a 6 speed with only 24000 miles total. Did some body work and passed the inspection and have essentially, to me, a new truck. Bought the dump pump drive for the transmission and switched the dump off my old worn out truck. Overall outlay about $10k. Value of the truck $30k+. Dependability and roadworthiness 100%. Worth every penny and all the effort IMO
     
  7. How often do you use the truck, and for what hauling purpose?

    If you use it once a month or "seldom", then the answer may be to fix what you have.
    Spending money for parts and labor may be cheaper than the extra insurance and taxes on a later model.

    If the truck is used a lot, or for a business then perhaps it is time for an update.
     
  8. Beeman

    Beeman Well-Known Member

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    Another alternative is to build a dump bed trailer. I have a friend that did this and it works great. You can power the hydraulics with a 12V power unit that connects to your truck. You don't have expensive tags or insurance and there is very little maintenance.
     
  9. scott

    scott Well-Known Member

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    we have a mile long driveway that is going to need a fair amount of material soon. we've found local haulers to be either unreliable or as I really like to see they get very good at what they are doing and end up with 6 giant trucks working road construction projects and get too busy for our little driveway.

    the gravel pit is a 14 mile round trip. there is also an endless supply of sawdust just down the road. the truck was originally a day cab single axle gasser ...a 532cid i think ... really short frame ... I don't think I'd have to do much of any lengthing although i have yet to get a tape measure out.

    haven't looked at insurance cost but I believe we can run it on farm tags which isn't prohibitive. also if I build a nice rigging I can pop the dump bed off and have a great 5th wheel toter for about the 1/3 of the price of a crew cab dually...and a great big horn !!
     
  10. Okie-Dokie

    Okie-Dokie Well-Known Member

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    All these replies have lots of merit. I had presumed you would just be using it on and around the farm. That is why I like the flat bed dump. Great for hauling hay and I like the way the bales just roll off the back. I can sell to farmers in the area who don't have a loader on thier tractor and have no way to get the hay off a reg. flatbed truck. I have hauled as much as ten bales at a time, keeping my bottom line looking better. The same theory works for hauling rock for your drive. If this is all you are going to do, bigger is better. Inputs are about the same to haul 5 tons in my little old farm truck as it does to haul 26 tons in an end dump T/T. Good Luck!
     
  11. Okie-Dokie

    Okie-Dokie Well-Known Member

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    I meant to include the addy for my free picture hosting place. I have a picture on my old clunker you may want to see. Pretty tough old Ford, rough and slow but does the job with out complaining too much. If I could find some new sheet metal, it would look a little better, but this is a working farm truck, so looks don't matter too much. The addy is www.photojo.com When you get there, scroll down the left side and click the "O's" then scroll down to one marked "Our Homestead". There you go.
     
  12. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    Scott, I got to thinking your situatiion and I have another suggestion. Try to find a truck of the similar size as yours but newer that was wrecked in the rear. Try to buy it for cheap then cut the frame in two behind the cab. Cut your current old truck in two at the same location then weld the two frames together and add a plate on either side of the frame. This would be easier and faster than changing the dump bed
     
  13. Is that six speed on the 4700 an overdrive unit?
     
  14. agmantoo

    agmantoo agmantoo Supporter

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    It is a 4900 with the dt466 engine and yes the sixth speed is an overdrive