big time fencing issues

Discussion in 'Pigs' started by naturegurl, Sep 4, 2006.

  1. naturegurl

    naturegurl Member

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    This past spring we decided that we needed to build a new outdoor pig pasture for our two 450lb pigs. After some internet research we constured the fencing using three strands of electric fence wire about six inches apart. We used cedar posts at the corners. And fiberglass poles to hold the wire in place. That seem to work for awhile, the pigs knew there boundaries, and they didn't dare touch that fence. Around the begaing of August, my fiance was working on the goat pen, so turn off the eletric charger. He forgot to turn it back on. Four days later we get a call at 330 in the morning from the local PD asking us if we have pigs and if they are missing. They were two adult pigs roaming near the local convience stores. Sure enough when we looked at back, the pigs were gone. Our pigs literally went to the market!!! :Bawling: So after a couple hours we manged to coax back to the farm with a couple of loaves of bread. As soon as we got them back into the pen, we plug the fence back in. We hadn't had any problems since. Until today. Like all pigs they like to root, and appraently they rooted a large enough ditch on the back side of the fence to get out. They got out, and this time they went in the opposite direction decided to go shopping at the local Agway next door. This time there escaped cost us. They did some dameged, rooted up some shrubs, spilled roofing tar all over the front walk way. I don't know how mutch this going to cost us. Bottom line is we need to come up with an alternative fencing situation. Something that is not going to cost us an arm and a leg(we need money for the wedding) Is it okay to keep these pig out side during the winter? We live in Maine and it can get really cold here. Please somebody help us.
     
  2. uncle Will in In.

    uncle Will in In. Well-Known Member Supporter

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    It depends on why you are keeping the hogs. Are they going to have pigs? Are they just pets? If they are not pets and not bred to have pigs, it's time to either sell them or butcher them. No fence required for the last two options. It is really best to have a hog pen that it's next to impossible for them to escape regardless of any unforseen circumstances. For ease of instalation, its hard to beat wire hog panels, or better yet the taller combination panels. They are 16 feet long, and can be made into a good pen by driving a steel T post at each end, and one in the middle of each panel. This will cost under $2 per foot of fence.
    They'd bring enough on the market to make a down payment on a dandy fine wedding gown.
    They will need shelter to get through the winter.
     

  3. ginsengsally

    ginsengsally Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, um, why do you have 2 450lb pigs? breeders? Pets?
     
  4. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    She may have teh same problem I'm having now, faced with sending two sweet animals off to the butcher. But c'mon peopple, that isn't the issue. She needs fencing help!

    With my own extremely limited experience, I will try to offer some. I would add one strand of electric tape, maybe on the bottom row. It's a new element so it may scare them enough, plus it's very visible. Much easier to work with, too. I would also rotate them through smaller sections if the current one is real big; divide it in half or something. That way the unused part will grow back up. Of course now that winter's approaching you'll have deep snow to deal with. I would definitely use tape then becasue you can tell at a glance if it's been snowed over. I hope you get more answers! I'm trying to decide about my gilt, whether to keep her through the winter and if it's worth the hassle just to have a few piglets to sell. With my 325 lb barrow in the freezer I won't need to raise any more pigs for two years! Sigh. I'm real sorry you're having all these troubles. Good luck.
     
  5. naturegurl

    naturegurl Member

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    The intention of these pigs was to keep them for breeding. The female pig is capable of having kids. The male pig was the first pig that we bought and we thought that it was bore, but it was really barrow. It was a real duh moument when we first figure this out. But any ways we were intending to get rid of the male pig, but we were just waiting for the next male piglet that we bought this year to get big enough to join the other female pig. We might just have to get rid of all the pigs now. Too mutch stress. I am not looking forward to Agway's bill. Thanks firefly for standing up for me.
     
  6. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    You're welcome. Perhaps Agway will be kind, especially if you're a regular customer. They should have insurance, and/or maybe your homeowners insurance would cover. At least you know you won't have a meat bill for a lonnnng time! :eek:
     
  7. naturegurl

    naturegurl Member

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    were working with our insurance right now on that. Hopefuly it will be covered. In addition we have four piglets (now 3 actually, we had a pig roast the other day) that will be going to the butcher in a couple of months. So we might have to sell the two big pigs. Which will be hard to do.
     
  8. patarini

    patarini Well-Known Member

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    Try using electric tape -- I am new to pigs, but I fenced pigcatraz with 4 rows of tape with zero problems so far, using a battery charged fence controller.
     
  9. Firefly

    Firefly Well-Known Member

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    I feel for ya. It is amazing how those pigs tug at the heartstrings! :Bawling: As I said I agree about the tape. However, now that they have figured out the can dig under the fence, you need something to thwart that. Buried hog panels combined with tape might do it. Buried barbed or even razor wire might be better, yuck. I've heard that they can lift unburied hog panels right up off the posts. Of course there's always nose ringing.......
     
  10. CountryMamaof5

    CountryMamaof5 Well-Known Member

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    Yes maybe you could bury some fencing, wood or something to where they cannot root around under the fence. (tries to think about what her own future has in store lol)
     
  11. John Schneider

    John Schneider Well-Known Member

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    Electric fencing is NOT suitable for perimeter fencing your property. You need a solid fence along your property perimeter. An electric strand "reminder" can be installed along the bottom to stop them from rooting under anything. I have not had an escape yet using 48" farm fence with 8' spaced posts and a 2x6 along the ground.
    I don't bother with electric at all on my perimeter.

    There have been a number of discussions on fencing pigs here. Do a search and read for hours about peoples' ideas for fencing. Electric fence is ideal for partitioning perimeter fencing to allow for pasturing, garden tilling, etc.

    It doesn't matter why you have 2 450 pound pigs. I am glad you do. Pigs are wonderful animals to have around for a variety of reasons.