Best way to treat multiple scrapes and cuts

Discussion in 'Goats' started by lgslgs, Aug 17, 2005.

  1. lgslgs

    lgslgs Well-Known Member

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    Our longest eared Nubian comes home with scratches and dings on his ears. We dab on Walmart's "Equate" brand generic version of Neosporin ointment (triple antibiotic creme) and that seems to heal things up quickly.

    Lynda
     
  2. TerriA

    TerriA Well-Known Member

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    My daughter used to have a horse... it got out and got cut up pretty badly with gashes, etc.

    What I did was apply a smear of antibiotic ointment and sprinkled slippery elm powder on it liberally. (It draws out infection). The horse didn't even have much of a scar after the hair grew back. I would check it daily (the first couple of days, 2x a day) and reapply as needed.

    You can usually find slippery elm powder at some health food stores but I got mine online at "San Fransisco Herb Co". (I THINK it is sfherb.com but I am not sure).

    Terri
     

  3. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    Sher,
    You said it! They are like night and day. The Saanen's have got to get into everything! We cannot set one thing on the ground for one minute or it is opened, torn apart, dismantled and chewed on. Our Nubians aren't interested, they just strut around like little princesses (including the wethers). But I like them all.

    I have some Equate triple antibiotic ointment, and I'll get some tea oil and try that, too.

    Added:
    Terri, Actually we have an elm on our property that looks a lot like a slippery elm.

    Thanks,
    Nancy
     
  4. Egypt Run Farm

    Egypt Run Farm New Member

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    I use a product called Blue Coat. It comes in a spray can and forms a layer of protection over the open area. It keeps flys and dirt from getting to the wound. I also use blue coat at disbudding time.
     
  5. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    Thanks,
    Searched and found the Blu-Kote. It sounds like what I need.

    In general, isn't it true that deeper wounds should be encouraged to heal from the inside out? So would creamy stuff, like triple antibiotic ointment be better for deeper wounds, and something that was dry, but breathes, be better for superficial wounds? I'm more concerned about infection and flies, than scars. Of course preventing scars would be nice, but probably not possible with these guys.

    Also found something called Furall---a powder spray for horses. Has anyone used this?

    Nancy
     
  6. Jen H

    Jen H Well-Known Member

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    See, now my nubian wether is the one who gets into everything. It figures I would have the weird one.

    I would (and do) use the blu-kote for superficial wounds and triple antibiotic ointment for deeper wounds. I think you're right that deep cuts heal better if they're kept moist.

    I've seen the Furall, but haven't used it myself.
     
  7. Laura Workman

    Laura Workman (formerly Laura Jensen) Supporter

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    Saline is a better rinse than peroxide. It doesn't damage tissue the way peroxide does.

    Blu-Kote stains like crazy. Consider yourself warned.

    Get some iodine wound spray (available at every feed store). Make sure it's wound spray, though and not straight 7% or you'll burn your goat. Spray that into the wounds. You can safely use it on really deep wounds. Iodine naturally repels flies, but if you're still worried, dry the iodine off from around the wound (not a bad idea anyway, since iodine is drying) and use some regular fly spray, applied with a rag so it doesn't get into the wound. Just spray on the rag and wipe onto the fur.
     
  8. Nancy_in_GA

    Nancy_in_GA Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Laura and Jen. Just wanted to let you know I've read what you posted, and appreciate the good advice very much.

    I've had goats only 1.5 years. Never expected to get so attached to them. Sometimes I want to just lock them up in the barn so they won't ever get hurt or scratched. But they seem to enjoy climbing around in the woods so much, I've resigned myself to take whatever happens, deal with it the best I can, and try to accept it if I lose one. But won't be easy.

    Nancy