Homesteading Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, we are transitioning to our fall crop (this is our first year of farming so its all new - we finally had a nice process down with the summer crops and now its fall crop time lol) which includes a lot of greens. In fact I have some kale ready to pick and sell now. I am wondering the best way to keep it fresh for the market. One other seller I have talked to picks it last thing the night before and keeps it in coolers with ice in the bottom (kale/greens seperated by a plastic vented container) and another I know picks it first thing in the morning before he leaves for market. Are there any other strategies or advice y'all could offer? It's most appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,507 Posts
I pick greens the day of market when possible. Otherwise, a cooler with ice, and a towel keeps the greens cool but off the ice directly.

When I was at our other farm I had a walk in cooler....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks. Wednesdays I have market at 10 and leave around 8-8:30 so I can pick the day of, on Saturdays I need to leave at 5:AM so not really possible to pick the day of.

One other question - We do a bag program (like a CSA but not subscription based) and would like to offer the greens (especially this week the kale that is ready) but sometimes the customers don't pick up their bags for a couple hours. Any suggestions on how to keep the greens fresh? I was thinking of offering it as an optional substitute for another item and specify that it needs to be refrigerated ASAP, but we will get to the point where most of the bag will consist of various greens that need to be refrigerated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Hi all, we are transitioning to our fall crop (this is our first year of farming so its all new - we finally had a nice process down with the summer crops and now its fall crop time lol) which includes a lot of greens. In fact I have some kale ready to pick and sell now. I am wondering the best way to keep it fresh for the market. One other seller I have talked to picks it last thing the night before and keeps it in coolers with ice in the bottom (kale/greens seperated by a plastic vented container) and another I know picks it first thing in the morning before he leaves for market. Are there any other strategies or advice y'all could offer? It's most appreciated!
We harvest Leafy Greens (Collards, Kale, Mustard, Swiss Chard, Turnips with bottoms, Beets with tops) on Friday prior to Market on Saturday morning. Wife bundles and ties greens then cuts the stems flat. We then stand the bundles in bins with water, much like one would do with floral bouquets. Then greens "drink" a significant amount of the water and stand up. As I am loading our pickup about 8 or 9 pm, I add water to the bins to be sure that the ends of the stems remain under water during the night.
Saturday alarm is at 5 am and we target driving no later than 6:15 am. Set up at market is at 7 am and market runs 8-12 noon. At the market, we transfer to smaller, transparent bins (from Wal-Mart) and again add water. Bundled beets and turnips are also stood in deeper bins with water and kept that way at the market.

We have a lot of compliments on how good our greens look during the market. We do this without ice or coolers.

A hydroponic vendor we are often adjacent to lays small bundles on Swiss Chard on their table and it wilts throughout the market. When we suggest our stand-in-water approach, over and over they reassure us that the keep it in water and on ice the night before.

Try trimming stems and standing in water and see if it works for you like it does for us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,575 Posts
We would put blocks of ice from the ice plant in the troughs. Harvesters would slice the greens and hand them up, they'd be plunged into the cold water and then stood up in the water.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,660 Posts
Our method is similar to Metalman's, except that our bunches of greens are laid on their sides covered in water all night. The next morning, the bunches are stood upright in their bins and all but a couple of inches of water is poured off. They stay nice all morning at market, and are often not even in the shade. No wilting.

Whole heads of lettuce are not submerged, but we make sure that the root end is kept in water. Basil is not submerged, either.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top