Best way to dismantle corn crib?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by mammabooh, Oct 1, 2008.

  1. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    I want to take this corn crib down and build my chicken coop on the concrete base. Any idea how Hubby and I should go about it that won't involve a trip to the emergency room? We have two neighbors with buckets on the front of their tractors, we could maybe get them involved. Thanks for any suggestions you can give.

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  2. watcher

    watcher de oppresso liber

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    Depends. How's it attached to the base? How are the sections held together. Do the sections run up and down or around the base? Got any pictures showing more detail?

    My first thought is to remove most of the fasteners holding it to the foundation, leaving enough to act as a hinge, then using a rope to pull it over. Then I'd work on taking it apart, how would depend on how its put together.

    My second thought would be to take a dozer or tractor with a loader and mash it down.

    My third thought would be to contract it out as salvage and let someone else deal with it. Of course you need to make sure you cover yourself in case of accident. IOW, make sure the people have their own issuance and sign waivers.
     

  3. NewDad

    NewDad Active Member

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    Looks like it would make a great pig pen right where it's at.

    Seriously, post it as a 'free' listing on Craislist.org and you'll have lots of recyclers lined up to do the job for you!:clap:
     
  4. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    It is bolted to the base.

    I just happened to think today as I was out there, that maybe we can unbolt it and then have the Amish crew that will be here soon knock it over with their earth-moving equipment. We can then work on taking it apart while it is on the ground.
     
  5. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    Yeah...I'd love to use it for a pig pen, but Hubby isn't too fond of pork. I told him we could sell it all and use it as income for our ag tax, but he didn't seem to think that was a good idea.
     
  6. 65284

    65284 Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Wow, how much better chicken pen could you ask for than you already have? If it's as good as it appears to be probably nothing you could build without spending a small fortune would as sturdy and predator proof.

    Why not build a small building adjoining the crib where the door is? Or build a small building and connect it to the crib door with a covered alleyway? Either way you would have a shelter and nest area and an easily accessible pen for your chickens.

    If that isn't a viable solution, before destroying it, think about advertising it for sale in the newspaper, local thrifty nickel type ad sheet, or Craigslist. Around here there is a very good demand for those cribs. At the very least you could probably get someone to dismantle and take away it for free.
     
  7. Stephen in SOKY

    Stephen in SOKY Well-Known Member

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    FWIW, I've priced 2 locally in the last 60 days, $500 for 1 & I take down, $650 for the other & they take it down. Here, if you advertised it, you'd have no trouble selling it.
     
  8. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    Hmmm...there are unused corn cribs all over the place here. I doubt if anyone would buy it, but I suppose I could ask around.

    Since this is very close to the creek, I need the pen to be secure against snakes and weasels, not just bigger critters.

    We have more than enough wood to build whatever size of chicken coop I want. For some reason, there are piles and piles of lumber sitting in the machine shed. The concrete base is an octagon, so I plan to build an octagonal chicken coop. Our friends built a small one last spring, so I hope to get their plans and double the size. I will then build a nice-sized run for them to the north (left side of the pic) of the building. I'd rather build the run on the east side so the coop would provide shade in the afternoon, but the ground on that side falls away quite a bit. I guess I'll just partially cover the west side of the run with something to shade it a bit.

    Anyway, thanks for all of the great suggestions!
     
  9. ihedrick

    ihedrick Can't stop thinkin'

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    If I was near you; I'd offer to take it down in exchange for the crib
     
  10. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    Come on over! Our pop-up camper is set up right now, so it could make for some deluxe accomodations.
     
  11. THETOOLMAN

    THETOOLMAN Well-Known Member

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    me to I need a corn crib really bad
     
  12. mammabooh

    mammabooh Metal melter Supporter

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    Maybe you guys can have a race to see who can get here first!
     
  13. MELOC

    MELOC Master Of My Domain

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    "free scrap metal...you remove"...put that advertisement out there and folks will be knocking your door down. :)
     
  14. travlnusa

    travlnusa Well-Known Member

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    I have taken down more than a few.

    Climb up toward the top. Tie off a very long rope to the side. Cut the bolts or chaines that hold it to the base.

    Tie the other end of the very long rope to any tractor, truck, etc.

    Drive off slowly.

    You will be shocked on how nice they come down in one piece and keep their shape.

    I say a LONG rope, because they tend to bounce when they hit the ground.

    Keep the sections. They make GREAT bale feeders, hog pens, crowd gate, sorting tub, etc.

    Keep the roof for your new coop
     
  15. watcher

    watcher de oppresso liber

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    I wouldn't think you'd need any heavy equipment. A good rope and a truck should do the job. As I said I'd keep some of the bolts in place. They would act as a hinge and prevent it from rolling one way or the other. Climb up and place the rope at the roof line then start removing bolts. When you have most of them removed give it a tug. If necessary you could use a couple of jacks to lift the off side.
     
  16. travlnusa

    travlnusa Well-Known Member

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    I would recommend against keeping any bolts in place. That will provide a point where the crib walls will bend as they fall over as the concrete base is most likely not even with the ground.
     
  17. watcher

    watcher de oppresso liber

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    I'd be worried that it might roll before or after pressure was applied to the rope. I rather crunch one side but be sure of where it was going to fall and sure it was going to stay where it fell.
     
  18. Sandhills

    Sandhills Well-Known Member

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    I saw a picture of one that had been turned into a gazebo. They had tiled the floor and then hung window frames on the side with flower boxes attached. Seems she had some flower vines growing on it also. It looked real nice.
    When you get it down you might want to save some of the sides to make tomato cages. Some of the best tomato cages I have are made out of the side of a corn crib.
     
  19. Michael W. Smith

    Michael W. Smith Well-Known Member

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    I don't know, seems like a waste to me. I'd do my best to make it into a chicken coop. I'll bet you could even make a two story coop out of it!

    Around here, I know my Dad had bought one that we had to take down. I think he paid $100.00 for it, but it didn't come down so well as it buckled.

    They ended up making the whole thing lower, but it sure does work as a corn crib.
     
  20. DayBird

    DayBird Big Bird

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    I wish I had about 20 of them.

    Put your macaw parrots in them. That's what I'd do.

    Wrap the whole thing in chicken wire and use all that wood to build a little house for the chickens to sleep in.