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So, we've got several hundred pounds of field corn. It's dry and we've shelled it. We have goats and chickens. Since we've gotten it I don't want it to go to waste, so I'm thinking of using it this winter for feed.

Just looking for some other folks experiences doing this. We've pretty much just bought store mixed feeds in the past.

Not sure if I should crack it in a mill, feed it straight, buy some other stuff to mix with it? I'm sure there's a lot of different answers.....maybe even another use I haven't thought of?

Thanks all.
 

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Do u have a mill?

Several hundred pounds really isn't much. If you have a mill you can grind it but you'd probably be fine just scattering it on the ground for the chickens.
 

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I feed it right on the cob to my chickens. It gives them a snacktivity and they are equipped with a gizzard to grind it themselves. Goats I am not sure about. I tried to feed my goats some but they didn't seem interested in it. My goats are kinda weird though.

I would mix it with your regular chicken feed. I have been mixing in whole grains I grow into my chicken ration for several years.
 

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Chickens can eat it whole, with grit they effectively grind it themselves.

Tho grinding it lightly - really just cracking it - will help them digest it slightly more efficiently.

I'm not familiar with feeding goats so don't want to say something wrong. I would suspect about the same tho, works ok whole, would be more efficient feed if cracked or ground. When you crack it the seed coat is opened and the starch is more easily digested more better.

Corn supplies a moderate level of protien and a lot of energy (starch).

You likely want to supply a bit more protein, and a mineral mix. But corn is a good general energy base of most animal feed. Your purchased mix probably contains a large amount of corn or DDG.

As you say, many different answers, probably won't go wrong, just if you want more meat, more milk, or what from your animals in a shorter amount of time.

Paul
 

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Goats will love whole shell corn. We used to feed that and alalfa hay. Milked quite well.
 

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The more corn they eat the lower in protein the ration will be, so add protein as well as your good shelled corn.
 

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I'd go very light on the corn to the goats.... unless you're fond of cabrito... Goat's that get too much whole grains, have this bad habit of dying within 24 hours. Unless you 'know' what you're doing, don't.

you can't kill a chicken by feeding it too much, goats are just searching for a way to die, and over feeding them is a favorite way to croak....
 

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I fed a whole flock of chickens nothing but feed corn for about 8 months. Noticed no reduction in egg laying or condition ( chickens were also free ranging daily ). I just tossed them the whole cob.
 

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As others have told you, chickens can handle whole grain. However, corn is about the size of the stones and grit they use to grind their food. They'll handle it better if it's cracked or coarsely ground, and fed with crushed limestone or shellgrit.

Ruminants, including goats, don't do well on pure grain. It tends to go straight through. This is why pigs and poultry can make a living following ruminants eating grain. In fact, pigs will nudge a sheep, cow or goat to wake them up, get them up, and get them to take an after-waking dump. If you're feeding them grain, it should be cracked or coarsely-ground.
Ruminants don't do well on the almost straight starch of grains, either. They need fibre with it. Hay, straw, sawdust, shredded paper all dosed with something to give it flavour. A touch of molasses or whey or spoiled milk, beet pulp, grape pomace or wine lees, apple pulp and cores and peels, raw crude sugar bagasse, shredded dried citrus peel, spent malt, just about any pulped overripe or insect-infested fruit or vegetable, soured or fermented anything.
 
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