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I need to win the family over to homemade sandwich bread. Give my your best sandwich bread recipe--the one that is closest to store bought. I need to transition the family slowly to stave off a mutiny. ;)
 

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This is the one I make http://everydayfoodstorage.net/2009...storage-recipe-challenge/food-storage-recipes it is an easy recipe (I use my kitchen aid mixer for mixing and kneading. I've made it with all regular (white) flour and all whole wheat flour (wheat montana prairie gold) with great results. As I worked to all wheat flour for the bread, I started changing the ratios of regular (white) flour to whole wheat to get the family accustomed. Even with all whole wheat they love it. I've even baked loaves for a few friends and they like the taste/texture too.


In the EZ Wheat bread recipe at the link, I use SAF Instant yeast http://www.amazon.com/Saf-Instant-Yeast-Pound-Pouch/dp/B0001CXUHW/ I also use local honey instead of sugar. for the nonfat dry milk - I instead use NIDO powdered whole milk as that is what I have on hand (without opening a #10 can of nonfat). I haven't tried butter - instead I use extra virgin olive oil. Those are just my preferences though.
 

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I made sniper69's bread, didn't have powdered milk so instead of water I used scalded milk, the scalding disables some proteins that interfere with raising the bread, I put in the vinegar in the white bread too, seemed to work alright. I didn't have gluten so I skipped that. Family liked it. This winter my experimental project is to make gluten from scratch. 1 cup water, 2 cups flour make into dough and work it well. Then take the dough ball and hold it under running water and wash the starch out of it. It's done when the water no longer turns milky, and you have a stringy goop left. Break it up, dry it, grind it in a flour mill till powder. Then add to bread. Buying it is easier but not as much fun. Oh when its in the stringy goop form you can fry it and eat it, think its called seitan.
 

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BlackFeather - glad to hear your family liked it. I usually use powdered milk just for bread baking (or for emergencies, lol). A can of Nido will last for a good year after opening, but if making bread on a regular basis won't take that long to use up. :)

What makes the bread almost like what is found at the store is the use of the potato flakes, vinegar, and gluten.

Now if I can talk some of my German friends into sending a recipe for a good multigrain Brötchen, I'll make that then post here about it. I'm hoping the starter I got from Poland (for Polish black bread) will work the way it is supposed to. :)
 

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Potato breads do last a little longer before molding although since its just me I make a few loaves at a time and slice then freeze them. I just pull out as many slices as i need and make my bagged lunches with the frozen bread(its thawed by lunchtime) or just throw it in the toaster to warm it up.

But here is my tried and true white (storelike) sandwich bread recipe.

http://www.thehungrymouse.com/2010/03/25/homemade-sandwich-bread/

I make and knead it by hand although the instructions are by mixer.
 

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sniper69...... where in bama are you from.... i am in central alabama..... look forward to your german bread receipe......my husband's great-grandfather was from germany.
 

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Plowboyswife - I lived in Montgomery for almost a decade. Hung out in the tri county area. Part of the moving to wherever uncle decides. Without going into details - I have friends in 'Bama that have told me many times that I was northern by birth and Southern by the grace of God. So I'm stuck with that (better than being called a D**n yankee by them), lol. :D

I'll write my former landlady and see if she can send me the recipe (then it will be the fun of translating, lol). I have German ancestry as well - so when living in Germany and finding out that I had family that came from the general area I lived in - it was a neat thing to find out.
 

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I use this recipe and if I want the bread more fluffy than dense I add a beaten egg :)

[FONT=&quot]Amish White Bread

Ingredients:

1 cup warm water (110 degrees)
1/3 cup white sugar
2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
3/4 teaspoon salt
2 Tablespoons olive oil (or veg oil)
3 cups bread flour

Directions:
1. In large bowl, dissolve the sugar in warm water, then stir in yeast. Allow to proof until yeast resembles a creamy foam. (This takes about 10 to 15 minutes in my kitchen)

2. Mix in 1 cup of flour, salt and oil. Mix in remaining flour 1/2 cup at a time. Stir until it pulls together, then knead on a lightly floured surface until smooth. Place in an oiled bowl, and turn dough to coat. Cover with a damp cloth. Allow to rise until doubled in bulk. (about an hour in my kitchen)

3. Punch dough down. Knead for a few minutes and shape into a loaf. Place in a well oiled 9 by 5 loaf pan. Allow to rise for 30 minutes OR until dough has risen 1 inch above top of pan.

4. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes.

I cool in pan 5 to 10 minutes, then remove from pan and cool, on side, on rack.

[/FONT]

[FONT=&quot] [/FONT]
[FONT=&quot]** For bread machine, first add liquid, sugar, oil and salt. Then add flour and yeast.[/FONT]
 

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Adding an egg into a recipe helps the bread to hold together and stops the crumbing everywhere.

And I don't make sandwich loaves.
I take the dough and form it into buns.
I make them fairly flat, more like hamburger buns.
And I can make them small like the slicer thingies (I like mine small) or larger.

Each sandwich is fresh!
I won't ever make a sandwich loaf again. :)
 

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I made sniper69's bread again. The last time I had a big bubble in it, when I punched the dough down I rolled it up and made a loaf, where the dough rolled together is where the bubble occurred. So this time before I rolled the dough into a loaf I wet my hand and rubbed water over the top of the punched down dough so it was sticky and would fuse together better. This loaf came out with out any large air holes. My family wants to eat home made bread instead of store bought once they found out human hair is one of the ingredients.

Amino acids are your body's building blocks, and while they can be good for your health, not all amino acids are created equal. L-Cysteine – an amino acid used to prolong shelf-life in products such as commercial bread – can be found in duck and chicken feathers and cow horns, but most that's used in food comes from human hair. It has been reported that most of the hair used to make L-Cysteine comes from China, where it's gathered from barbershops and hair salons. You can avoid L-Cysteine by buying fresh bread from a local baker, as it is not an additive in flour. Steer clear of fast food places such as McDonald's, Dunkin' Donuts and Burger King too, who all use L-Cysteine as an additive.
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeands...3/10-gross-ingredients-food-horsemeat-scandal
 
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