best time to buy bulk meats?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Unregistered-1427815803, Jan 3, 2004.

  1. I wonder when is the best date to buy bulk meats on sale to put it in freezer?
     
  2. farmmaid

    farmmaid Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Answer is NEVER! Grow your own or support a farmer who is trying to grow healthy food without "junk" injected into the animals. I am so tired of people who say they can't grow their own (no land, no knowledge) BUT never think of those private people who are trying sooooooo hard to make a difference! Call your extension agent and get a list of local farmers who raise natural animals, the way they should be raised. Yes, maybe a few $ more..aren't you and your family worth it?...Joan
     

  3. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    I trade garden produce to an area cattle raiser in exchange for part of his processed beef cuts when he puts up his yearly beef.
     
  4. BCR

    BCR Well-Known Member

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    October/November and December are good months to buy from the beef guy I know. Glad I got mine from him as we know it is safe from all the worries we hear about on the news.
     
  5. moopups

    moopups In Remembrance

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    Purchase meat on the last hour that the store is open the day before a holiday on which the store will be closed. There are major mark downs to be found at that time.
     
  6. Bob in WI

    Bob in WI Well-Known Member

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    Just bought a quarter from the guy who raises beef and sells it to the food coop in our area. It is not called organic, but it could be, he just doesn't want to do the paperwork.

    With the whole mad cow fiasco we are glad we won't have to buy any meat on the open market for a while.

    BTW, we currently unfortunately live in town so we can't raise our own beef, although I would love to. We have raised many other animals over the years.

    We are so glad to have found this man who raises beef as natural as possible. If you have someone in your area doing it, support them if you can. Yes the price may be a few cents per pound higher, but if you can support them it is worth the money, for your health, and for that of your family.
     
  7. Thanks.... I wish I could raise my own meats but area i lives arent allowed have large livestock. i want to raise few pig but town arent allowed it either! all I am allowed is have no more than 25 chicken and NO rooster!
    I am thinking about start to raise rabbits (but my family wouldnt eat it) any other idea to have a livestock with few or no restrict on it. I arent buy any more meats due to skyrocket price.
    Thanks for all who reply
     
  8. Ken Scharabok

    Ken Scharabok In Remembrance

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    Before you go looking for beef on the hoof find where you will have it processed. The small 'mom & pop' processors are closing at a good rate. Locally you have to book 6-8 weeks in advance, sometimes longer. Miss the date - sorry, you get back in line. Also consider how you will get the animal to the processor. You may be able to borrow a small horse trailer.

    Actually, this allow a nice fattening out time if you want to do some natural graining while you are waiting for your kill date. Likely the person you are buying from will have the capability to do so for the cost of the feed you want and something for their time.

    Then there is the freezer capacity at home.

    For what to pay go to a couple of livestock auctions to see what they type of stock you are interested in are selling for. Remember, if you buy direct, the producer will be avoiding the cost of taking the animal to the livestock auction and their associated cost there. Thus, if you pay the going rate, they are still getting a small premium.

    Ken S. in WC TN
     
  9. Corky

    Corky Well-Known Member

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    OK ... So, you all will faint when you hear this but...
    I use to buy my meat on the hoof and also butcher my own.
    We don't eat enough meat to do that any more. There is just the two of us now.

    I BUY IT ON SALE AT THE STORE! sorry! :eek:

    Right now we are having a dollar day sale at the local store in the small town I work in. They have beautiful meat there. I don't know where it comes from but it is always lean and good.

    Chicken breasts, pork steaks,bacon, hamburger and more... I just forgot. I buy as much as I can afford at that very low price and put it in the freezer. Steak is $2 a pound. I never buy unless it is on sale at a really good price. I stock up enough that I can afford to wait.

    They had several sales on country ribs last summer and I filled up the freezer at 99 cents a pound. We had ribs very often!!! :haha:
     
  10. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Is true. Also applies to fresh produce - fruit and vegetables - as well.

    Also if it's a major long weekend (say last Christmas, when holday and Boxing Day preceded an ordinary weekend) - if they hadn't cleared it before , it was likely to go off. Also, if it wasn't going to go off over the weekend, there were good prices on the almost-expired stuff the day after the super-long-weekend as well.

    Is also true that there will be major "out-of-times" after major holidays. Take your time, but after major holidays (Christmas, New Year, Easter, Thanksgiving, whatever) go through the long-life stuff (hams, frozen poultry) and note their expiry dates. You'll generally find that any particular type of meat will all expire around the same date. Come back no earlier than a day or two before that date, and see if there's any of it left. If so, tell the store management that you noticed that such-and-so is about to expire, and that while you're not really trying to screw them on prices, you'd be prepared to buy it for your freezer if they were prepared to put a good-enough price on it. It is entirely possible to get it knocked down to something like quarter-price (he says, from experience).