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Formerly 4animals.
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What are the cars and trucks that can run SVO/WVO?
I know that the older pre-1985 Mercedes and dodge 12valve cummins can. But there are more that can, I just havn't found any reliable sources.

Thanks, Travis
 

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Just howling at the moon
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SVO - straight vege oil
WVO - waste vege oil
 

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I have heard anecdotal stories of early '80s Diesel Vovlos being able to run on WVO. I have a friend who converted her 01 Jetta TDI to run on SVO/processed WVO with a commercial kit. I think she had to put a small dino-diesel tank where her spare tire used to be for cold weather starting.
 

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VW TDI can run the oils, you need a kit on any vehicle that will be run in weather below 40 degrees F to start and stop the vehicle on normal diesel and then warm the oil before trying to run on it as those oils sludge up below 40F.

So the kits are basically fuel switches to switch from running on normal diesel to veggie oil, and heating units to heat the veggie before letting it into your fuel system when its cold.
 
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I was a diesel mechanic years ago. Any mechanically injected engine will burn any liquid that will burn. Used engine oil, used tranny fluid, all kinds of veggy oil, anything.

the chevy 6.2, and 6.5.
the ford 6.9,
volkswagens, mercedes.

A mechanically injected engine is anything that has an injector pump with high pressure steel lines going to nozzels that are screwed into the head.

injectors are controled with electricity.
Nozzels are controled with fuel pressure.

nozzels are much more forgiving, and mechanically injected systems have gear pumps that feed the injection pumps with 40 psi, or so. They are much more forgiving. They will pump much thicker fluids, and by the time the fluid gets to the nozzel it has been heated, and thinned enough to atomize.
 

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Ya Max, that's what they all tell me to put in my diesel fuel to clean her up after sitting...auto tranny fluid. Good to know my mechanical nozzles are good for VO use. One more chit in favor of trying to convert it.
 

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Formerly 4animals.
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
michiganfarmer said:
I was a diesel mechanic years ago. Any mechanically injected engine will burn any liquid that will burn. Used engine oil, used tranny fluid, all kinds of veggy oil, anything.

the chevy 6.2, and 6.5.
the ford 6.9,
volkswagens, mercedes.

A mechanically injected engine is anything that has an injector pump with high pressure steel lines going to nozzels that are screwed into the head.

injectors are controled with electricity.
Nozzels are controled with fuel pressure.

nozzels are much more forgiving, and mechanically injected systems have gear pumps that feed the injection pumps with 40 psi, or so. They are much more forgiving. They will pump much thicker fluids, and by the time the fluid gets to the nozzel it has been heated, and thinned enough to atomize.
which chevy motor was the good one? wasnt one a converted 350 gas motor?
and what years were the ford 6.9s made?
were the 12valve cummins a mechanically injected?
 

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4animals said:
which chevy motor was the good one? wasnt one a converted 350 gas motor?
and what years were the ford 6.9s made?
were the 12valve cummins a mechanically injected?
The GM diesel that was most popular was the 6.5L which came in turbo and non turbo versions. The earliest ones were also non electronic controlled which is a benefit for older truck owners. They were all mechanically injected, just electronically(computer for lack of a good word)controlled. The 6.2L was the earlier ones and I have seen them go 300k mi. with no problem, just lacking in power like the 6.9L Fords. They can be retrofitted with a Banks turbo and will have plenty of power. The Dodge diesels were mechanically injected and also electronically controlled, not sure if any were totally mechanical or what years.
The GM diesel that got the bad rep was a 5.7L that was based on an Oldsmobile block design, it wasn't a converted gas engine just used the same external dimensions. I would like to have a GM pickup with one of these right now as it was a pretty simple design and when refined worked pretty good.
 

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As mentioned, any diesel motor can run on WVO. Not that many car companies have made diesels other than Mercedes, VW, and the american trucks, though. Several companies made diesels for one year in about 1982, as well, but they're really rare. WVO can get pretty thick or solidify in winter as folks have mentioned. A local group doing the conversions had shaft in the injector pumps of a VW shear off when it encountered thick WVO, but that Mercedes has a much more robust system capable of handling that situation. Check out Piedmont biofuels (or any other groups like it) to get help with conversions and to prevent you from making the same mistakes others have made. good luck
 
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