Best lamp oil

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by trapperJim, Jan 25, 2008.

  1. trapperJim

    trapperJim The Boss of the Swamp

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    What would you consider to be the best buy in lamp oil? I'm looking for recommendations for an oil that burns clean with little to no odor as well as an affordable source for it. What are you all using these days and where do you buy it?
     
  2. hotzcatz

    hotzcatz Well-Known Member

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    Ah, the BEST lamp oil is the lovely scented stuff from the hardware store that is really expensive. That, however, is not the most economical lamp oil.

    We used to get a really high grade of kerosene from a small gas station over near South Point, but I don't think they are there anymore and the commute would be a bit much for you. We would fill our containers from a pump they had and it was about the price of diesel.

    If you have to, diesel #2, I think it was, can be used, but it is sorta smoky and smelly. Probably not good for inside, we used it for tiki torches in the yard to keep the mosquitoes at bay.

    Probably buying a 55 gallon drum of lamp grade oil from a gas distributor may be the most economical choice. I don't think the stuff degrades much if it is stored, but you may want to look into that. Have you tried calling the folks who supply your local gas stations with their oil and gasoline? Perhaps if you went together with some other folks in your neighborhood, you could split a large quantity into smaller portions.
     

  3. Ohio Rusty

    Ohio Rusty No charge for awesomeness

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    I find the best lamp oil for the little lamps I make and use is olive oil. If you are referring to the kerosene/paraffin type, I use the liquid paraffin unscented.
    Most of the lamp burning I do is olive oil lamps. Olive oil isn't explosive flammable like kero/paraffin. You can fill your olive oil lamp while it's burning without the fear of explosion or fire. Spills are easily cleaned up, and olive oil is available everywhere. You can eat it when not burning it. I make my lamps with just a length of copper wire and a cotton wick in a clear jar.
    Ohio Rusty
     
  4. Cabin Fever

    Cabin Fever Life NRA Member since 1976 Supporter

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    You can burn the cheapest kerosene you can find in an Aladdin lamp with no odor and no pollution.
     
  5. RichieC

    RichieC Well-Known Member

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    If you properly care for the lamp and keep the wick trimmed. Which most people don't.
     
  6. VonWolfen

    VonWolfen Well-Known Member

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    My vote goes for odorless mineral oil...sometimes called reduced ordor mineral oil...or odorless paint thinner. It is simply mineral oil with the sulfur reduced or removed. It can be purchased at any big box or hardware store.
     
  7. Eric Klein

    Eric Klein Member

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    I find that kerosene burns better than the liquid parafin - it travles up the wick better.
    In my expeiance the kerosene you buy at the store in a jug, 1or 2 gals. smells a little nicer than the stuff from the gas station. I've burned up to 10 lamps at the same time and notice only a slight kerosene smell that isn't objectionable. It also helps to make sure your wicks are well trimed. Hope this helps.
     
  8. trapperJim

    trapperJim The Boss of the Swamp

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    Thank you for the replies. If olive oil can be burned in a lantern, how about other vegetable based oils such as canola, peanut, corn oil etc?
     
  9. ozarkcat

    ozarkcat Well-Known Member

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    Any chance you can post a picture or directions on making them? DH has tried several times to make lamps using vegetable oils and either gets blazing infernos (which has me moving nervously towards the fire extinguisher) or smouldering messes (which have me moving to open windows & grab fans - not fun in the middle of winter ;) )
     
  10. ET1 SS

    ET1 SS zone 5 - riverfrontage Supporter

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    Yes.

    As Cabin Fever has pointed out many times, any lantern that uses a mantel should burn odorless and without soot.

    So no matter what you burn there should not be a smell if you use a mantel.

    Old time ceramic lamps in Bible times burned olive oil, we have a bunch of them. But being an open wick they do smell and they do soot.

    Some mantel lanterns will burn all flammable oils.
     
  11. Old John

    Old John Well-Known Member Supporter

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    We use the Citronella Oil, in oil lamps all year long.
    It burns a little Brighter than regular kerosene or lamp oil.
    It has a pleasant, not over bearing odor.
    It has a light yellow color in the lamps.
    Most colored oils plug up yur wicks. But not Citronella.
    And it's not toxic indoors.
    Look it up; do some research on it.
    I'm not sure how it would work in an Alladin Lamp, though.
    We have been burning it for years.
    G'd Luck.
     
  12. Nevada

    Nevada Voice of Reason Supporter

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    For indoor use you should always use 1-K (sometimes called K-1) kerosene. That grade of kerosene is ultra low sulfur and nitrogen, eliminating poisonous SOx and NOx emissions.

    In my community we have a petroleum company that carries 1-K kerosene at a pump similar to a gasoline pump, currently priced at $4.069/gallon. I pump it into a 5 gallon blue plastic can (blue denotes kerosene) that I bought at Walmart. I use it for my kerosene fired backup furnace.

    While I don't happen to object to the odor of kerosene, those who do can purchase fragrance oil for kerosene. You can find it at eBay from this vendor:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/PREMIUM-OIL-BAS...ryZ41273QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

    While the above fragrance oil auction happens to be for vanilla lavender, the same seller also carries lilac, cherry vanilla, frank & myrrh, lemon, cranapple, strawberry banana, lemon verbena, wintergreen, powder rose, and many others. That type of fragrance oil also happens to be good for adding fragrance when making soap & candles.

    You can also buy the recipe and make your own.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/100-Recipes-for...ryZ20557QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
     
  13. pgmr

    pgmr Member

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    I prefer whale oil, but the price has gone up so much, I've had to switch to baby seal oil.
     
  14. bowdonkey

    bowdonkey Well-Known Member Supporter

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    You can still get whale and harp seal oil reasonable if you only shop the blue light sales.
     
  15. homebody

    homebody Well-Known Member

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    And what size/kind of wick to use. Please?