Best grain to grow on 1/4 acre for homestead?

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by ThistleMary, Jun 17, 2017.

  1. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    The corn will rot, stalks and all if not covered while in storage.
     
  2. AmericanStand

    AmericanStand Well-Known Member

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    Back to the OP if you are experimenting I'd plant a little each of wheat ,barley , oats, sunflowers ,milo, and rice.
     

  3. Bellyman

    Bellyman Well-Known Member

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    I hadn't thought of rice but that's an interesting idea. It's not something we eat a lot of but a little here and there. Anybody here grow rice for their own use?
     
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  4. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    Rice? Seriously?
     
  5. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    To grow rice you have to be able to flood the field.
     
  6. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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  7. coolrunnin

    coolrunnin Well-Known Member

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    No you don't! They grow dry land rice in several states.
     
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  8. 3legdonkey

    3legdonkey Limping

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    OP. Over the last 20 years, we have average about 86 bushels of corn per acre on one of our farms. This is with good soil, yearly fertilization, and rotating the crops with beans. On another farm, with more marginal soil, we were lucky to get 60 bushels an acre. If you do not have excellent soil, you might consider growing corn and beans together. More water is required but the beans will fix nitrogen for your corn, and the corn will provide a pole for your beans to climb.
     
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  9. AmericanStand

    AmericanStand Well-Known Member

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  10. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    There are only a couple of varieties that don't require flooding the fields, and they aren't common nor productive.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rice_production_in_the_United_States#Types_of_rice

     
  11. coolrunnin

    coolrunnin Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Jun 19, 2017
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  12. AmericanStand

    AmericanStand Well-Known Member

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    Irrigation and flooding are different things with different purposes.
     
  13. txcajunla

    txcajunla Active Member

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    SOIL QUALITY --- Should have been the first parameter looked at.
     
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  14. FarmboyBill

    FarmboyBill Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Well, where I seen it growed, it was in water a foot or more deep.
     
  15. Mickie3

    Mickie3 Well-Known Member

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    Around here (northern Indiana corn-belt area), the average runs way over 200 bushels / acre, but friends who live and farm in KY are lucky to get 150 or so. It is highly dependent on the area you are in, soil, equipment you use, etc.

    The record crop for corn was 500+ bushels an acre, IIRC, but they went to some serious extremes to get that.

    Here is an article with some interesting info on record crops, OP, you may want to look at this to see what the records are, how they did it, etc.

    http://northernag.net/AGNews/AgNewsStories/TabId/657/ArtMID/2927/ArticleID/3715/-New-World-Record-Corn-Yield.aspx
     
  16. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    It's self explanatory.

    That link was already posted.
    It doesn't change the data I posted.
     
  17. TWG1572

    TWG1572 Well-Known Member

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    That's exactly right. There's a lot of sugar sand soil in some parts of FL, you aren't going to raise much of a corn crop on that without some serious work on getting your fertility and organic matter up.

    For reference - average FL yield for corn in '16 was 145 bushels and wheat was 30 bushels. I would guess that includes a high percentage of irrigated acres. I'd budget lower if I was the OP.

    The nationwide record average yield has too much noise in it because there is too much variability in yields across the country - for example, my farm's yield average (APH) is higher than that.

    If it were me, I'd do a mix of crops and see what worked in my area. No use throwing all your eggs in one basket right away.
     
  18. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm This Space For Rent Supporter

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    That's pretty close to the 164 BPA average.
     
  19. coolrunnin

    coolrunnin Well-Known Member

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    So you're conceding your initial analysis was incorrect! Gotcha