Best/Easiest animal poo for composting

Discussion in 'Livestock' started by pointsevenout, Dec 6, 2017.

  1. pointsevenout

    pointsevenout Well-Known Member

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    Want to keep an animal species for poo collection for composting straw and leaves. Don't have any grass clippings unless I buy a new mower. I do have cow, mushroom, turkey, and chicken compost, as well as worm castings. But those things I have to buy and are used for a special soil less mix I use for raised beds. I would like to do it all from scratch with an animal that will provide the initial poo for composting. So far I'm looking at chickens or goats, maybe rabbits. Looking for some input here for ease of upkeep that will yield poo for a medium compost pile once or twice a year. And if I get a new mower, maybe more.
    We have crop farmers around here. Corn and soy and cotton mostly on large acreage. Believe they all do chemical spraying from planes. There is only one neighbor that keeps about a dozen chickens in their fenced back yard. I have not approached them about what they do with their poo.
     
  2. hiddensprings

    hiddensprings Well-Known Member

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    Goats and Rabbits are great for composting. Chicken as well but it has to compost longer. Rabbits are easy keepers just keep them safe. Chickens as well. Goats are fabulous (I love them) but its good to have a mentor to help with your management practices. Best wishes
     
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  3. Shrek

    Shrek Singletree Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    All poo litter needs to be heat pre-composted to eradicate pathogen, residual wormer/anti parasitic elements , etc.

    Chicken litter heat pre composts at a higher temperature than rabbit and goat pellets do.

    From my understanding, human, canine and feline poo litter is the most complex to pre compost due to residual toxicity elements that remain and that is why those are not advised for use with food crops especially organic qualified as the residuals greatly affect the beneficial microbe values of the heat pre composted and microbe /worm aerobically finished compost suitable for fertilizer use on food crops.
     
  4. pointsevenout

    pointsevenout Well-Known Member

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    Did a search for pre-composting manure and all of the results had to do with vermicomposting.
    So are you saying that I have to have my raw manure go through a pre-composting step before using it in my compost pile of leaves and straw and such?
     
  5. Bearfootfarm

    Bearfootfarm Hello, hello....is there anybody in there.....? Supporter

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    Rabbits are about the easiest since you can have the compost pile right under their cages.
    Confined chickens will also generate a lot of droppings.
    Sheep and Goats will produce some, but a lot will be on the pastures where it's hard to collect unless you keep them confined which isn't good for their health.

    I'd go with the Rabbits since they reproduce easily, have a very high feed to meat ratio, and don't require a lot of space or pastures.
     
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  6. Oregon1986

    Oregon1986 Well-Known Member

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    My favorite manures to use are cattle and rabbit
     
  7. Scape

    Scape Active Member

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    Llamas are great for poo piles - they have a bathroom so only use that spot and it piles up fast and they really do not eat that much either. Rabbits are great too but seemed to be more work than the llamas. Goats are okay but go anywhere they want.
     
  8. oldasrocks

    oldasrocks Well-Known Member

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    To get our soil started we hauled in 7 dump truck loads of old horse manure a few years ago. Here in Missouri we have to make dirt to grow something. We found horse manure actually uses up your nitrogen when breaking down so had to add a couple hundred lbs of nitrogen.

    This fall we put 4 little pigs in the garden area 50 X 60 ft for 3 months. They roto-tilled it up nice and fertilized accordingly. It will be interesting to see what the garden does this next yr.
     
  9. mmoetc

    mmoetc Well-Known Member

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    Whatever you decide to raise will work. I’d look at it from the other end, so to speak. We’ve raised poultry, sheep , pigs, rabbits, and beefers at various times and while the manure provided was used and was useful it was never the driver. The meat and fiber provided by those animals was and determined their viability on our place. Feeding animals strictly for manure production seems, to me, to be a cost ineffective way of adding fertility. Using manure from animals which have provided some other benefit seems, to me, more cost effective and wise.

    All that being said, rabbits are easy and their droppings easily contained and mixed in. Our sheep shelter provided a bounty each spring when we cleaned it out. The chicken coop with deep straw bedding required more frequent cleaning but once composted made excellent soil.

    Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
  10. pointsevenout

    pointsevenout Well-Known Member

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    My first thoughts is the rabbit for their poo. As research continues, the idea of meat rabbits satisfies me and am thinking about filling up my freezer with rabbit meat. And also I'm curious about making rabbit pelts so I can make a coat or something. Looking hard at the large chinchilla rabbit.
     
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  11. anniew

    anniew keep it simple and honest Supporter

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    I have used rabbit manure without composting it. The results for the plants were great.
    However, if you use a good quality commercial rabbit food, it isn't really cost effective.
    I have New Zealand rabbits, and am happy to subsidize their food, just for the experience of raising them, plus they put food in the freezer (just today actually), but I need to harvest them earlier to make the food costs less and to make the meat more tender. If you go with rabbits and are in a freezing zone, I'd suggest that you harvest all but your breeders before it gets down to freezing, as it is a pain to keep them in liquid water, plus the manure in the trays beneath the cages freezes and both things become a great pain if you have any number of animals.
     
  12. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Best and easiest? In China, they have outhouses along the highway. Just put a bucket and collect, free, easy and loaded with nutrients.
     
  13. pointsevenout

    pointsevenout Well-Known Member

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    Guess the next question is can rabbit droppings be used effectively as a nitrogen source for compost piles, being that the droppings can be used straight into a garden without burning anything?
     
  14. pointsevenout

    pointsevenout Well-Known Member

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    Dang, what a budget you have, being able to go to China at the drop of a hat to pic up human waste. And how do the baggage handlers feel about your luggage?:eek: Also I thought human waste was exactly that. Waste and things that the body will not adsorb. So how beneficial is it truly to use human waste as a growing medium when it will be rejected once again?...........Or are you suggesting that all the animals in China are potty trained to use highway outhouses?:D
     
  15. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I think the market is taken for Chinese human waste, my suggestion was for implementation here. The waste from humans is the source of essential nutrients for plants. Odd that you'd think that digested human food wouldn't be a beneficial fertilizer for plants. But in a very basic way, the nutrients we take in are eventually expelled. Someone once told me you can't buy beer, only rent it. Sort of the same for bean soup and cider.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2017
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  16. Polarbearforge

    Polarbearforge Member

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    Among other things, we have a llama and some alpacas. They have a "cold" manure that doesn't require composting at all, but still can be mixed in a compost pile if desired.

    Jamie
     
  17. Ronney

    Ronney Well-Known Member

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    Oh dear pointsevenout, you really do have your head stuck in the sand don't you. We are on septic and before the tank is cleaned out (once every 5 years or so), I take the lid off and dig out the top of it - beautiful, rich, black soil full of worms. And yes, it gets spread on my vege garden. I'm still here without any dreaded diseases.

    Apart from human waste that has been allowed to compost, I go for pig manure followed by chook then sheep and cattle with horse at the bottom. All of it is beneficial. And quite frankly, a dozen chooks are going to have minimal impact on anything. Forget about the ease of upkeep, nothing comes free or with minimal input.

    Cheers,
    Ronnie
     
  18. pointsevenout

    pointsevenout Well-Known Member

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    Maybe misinformed. Maybe ignorant. Definitely not head stuck in the sand. That's why I'm here, to learn. From how I see it, all the other animals digest food leaving a waste product that they can not use. It is different waste than human waste. I can see using other animal waste in a compost pile. Their byproducts contain minerals and nutrients that humans can use, once in a composted form. Then the fruits and vegetables can uptake those minerals and nutrients which the humans consume to their benefit. Human waste, although a good nitrogen source to fire up a compost pile, has no minerals and nutrients the body can adsorb to its benefit. Because the body has expelled it once before. But whatever else in that compost pile with human waste surely has beneficial value.

    I too have a septic tank and it never has had to be cleaned out in over 20 years. I do however use my urine to jump start straw bales to composting in my raised beds but switch over to other organic nitrogen sources once the crops are planted.

    Tell me that I'm wrong. Tell me why I'm wrong. I'm here to learn.
     
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  19. haypoint

    haypoint Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When humans consume food, it gets digested. Our digestive systems do not mine the nutrients and minerals from the food. We intake and expel nearly everything. That is why we have to keep eating. The difference between 100 pounds of whole potatoes composted and 100 pounds of potatoes digested is minute. Same for everything.
    Plants are far simpler than animals. They need just the three basic elements, N, P, K and tiny amounts of trace elements. Compost helps the soil by increasing moisture retention, holding the nutrients where the roots can reach them and digesting plant material in the soil.
    The amounts of N, P, K in manure depends on what the animal was fed. Very little difference from hog manure and human manure.
    But you are looking for a cheap source of manure. See your local sewage treatment plant.
     
  20. mmoetc

    mmoetc Well-Known Member

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    Of course our bodies mine nutrients and minerals from what we eat. How else do we acquire the basic neccessities our bodies need to sustain life?

    Our bodies do do a better job at extracting some things than others and on occasion will even extract more than neccessary. Ask anyone who has passed a kidney stone whether their body extracts calcium or not. It’s hard to die from something like heavy metal poisoning if your body isn’t extracting it from what you eat and depositing it in various tissues.

    Where this applies to the question of nutrients in human manure is that the human body doesn’t extract everything. A doctor will often tell you that high dose vitamins just make expensive pee. Often the body will take what it needs and expel the rest making that poo and urine a good source of nutrients, both macro and micro. Of course it can also pass along a variety of bad things like disease organisms if not handled properly.