Believe it's Milk Neck/Milk Goiter not Bottle Jaw

Discussion in 'Goats' started by Faithful Heart, Aug 11, 2006.

  1. Faithful Heart

    Faithful Heart Well-Known Member

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    A few weeks back I had been asking here for advice and direction, and everyone was really helpful. But I recently found something interesting that I wanted to share.

    My little doe came to me with diarhea, and I had noticed some other stuff - extra shedding, and a swollen neck were the biggest things. I was in somewhat of a panic when I noticed the swollen neck, thinking it was bottle jaw and that she might be near death. The "near death" part confused me though, because she certainly didn't ACT near death - eating, playful.

    I came to the conclusion at the time that she must have worms pretty bad (even though her eyes were still a strong pink - red). The shedding, diarhea, unsurety on eye color, possible foamy mouth, coughing after a bottle, and what I thought at the time was bottle jaw..... all said to me WORMS - LOTS OF WORM - MABYE LUNG WORMS. (sigh) :shrug: I'm new at this stuff.

    Anyway, the little girl is doing just great at this point - eating hay/feed/bottles, gaining weight, playful as usual, shedding seems to have slacked off alot, eyes seem the same (nice pink-red), no diarhea (perfect berries now). But she still has this swelling in her neck.

    I came across something at the Fias Co Farm site called Milk Neck. Of course swelling in the neck can mean many things - bottle jaw, CL, abscess, insect sting, or this milk neck. Her swelling fits milk neck to a T.

    I just wanted to share this because apparently many people haven't heard of this condition before. I wanted others to know there ARE other possibilities to swelling at the neck, other than mostly terrible conditions - like CL or bottle jaw. I feel it's extremely important to investigate WHAT the reason might be. But I just wanted to share my experience so maybe someone else out there might avoid the panic that I got in when thinking my baby doe had bottle jaw and was possibly "near death". I tried taking some pictures, but they aren't the greatest. If anyone is interested I will post them, but since they aren't so great I figured I wouldn't hassle with it at this time.

    Oh.... and I know someone out there will say - "this is the reason for vet checks and fecals". And that's a valid point..... but not always the end all answer. I've found that when it comes to goats, there's not alot of vets that deal with goats, or know much about them. It also seems that most goat farmers deal with problems on their own. I think mostly for cost reasons, because most goat farmers have MANY goats, and if one goat has a problem/illness, many of the others are in danger of it to. And having the vet see many half wild goats isn't that easy. But for whatever reason, vets just don't deal with goats much. My vet said this - "I don't take much stock in fecals in goats". :shrug: He goes by signs and symptoms, and said he would often have the person treat for many/all possibilities.... starting with the least expensive option. Goats are not pets in his view (that's fine, whatever), and can be eaten rather than treated. Too costly to treat the whole herd, just cull the sick..... basiclly. But that a whole nuther topic. :rolleyes:

    Hope this info helps someone.
     
  2. AllWolf

    AllWolf We love all our animals

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    Beth thanks for posting this and it is helpful when someone post something new and it helps others learn it also..

    Glad to hear the little one is doing better. :)

    Keep up the great work.
     

  3. moonspinner

    moonspinner Well-Known Member

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    My friend has a young wether who had an enormous grapefruit sized mass that looked like goiter. He too was otherwise acting and eating fine, no other symptoms. He stumped all vets until she took him to Cornell and turned out he had a benign glandular tumor. Had surgery and is fine now.
     
  4. Faithful Heart

    Faithful Heart Well-Known Member

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    Sheesh! Don't scare me like this.

    Guess I'll just have to wait and see if it goes away by the time she's 4 months or something.... like it should. I think it's gotten smaller though, so I'm not really all THAT scared. Good thing to keep in mind though. For future referance. Her's isn't grapefruit size or anything. My husband never even noticed it till I pointed it out.
     
  5. moonspinner

    moonspinner Well-Known Member

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    I'm sure the wether was a highly unusual and rare case. Plus it wasn't a kid - he was about 18 months. If you observe the swelling decreasing sounds like a great sign.