Behavior issues/trainer/ever have this problem?

Discussion in 'Working and Companion Animals' started by Caelma, Oct 14, 2005.

  1. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    Have any of ou ever used a behavior specialist?
    If so how did it work out?

    I adopted my sons dog after he moved and decided he liked being without a dog and since his wife took a job, no one is home 8 to 10 hrs a day.

    She has been my granddoggy since she was 6 weeks old. I always watched her when they went on vacations and away week-ends.

    She is a pit bull, very very sweet and very smart and well trainned.
    She knows come, sit, down, stay, crawl, speak, let go, back up and more in both verbal and hand commands.
    She is now 4 y/o

    The problem is when hubby and I hug or kiss she gets very upset and thinks we are hurting each other. I called my son and asked if he and his wife beat on each other (I was joking) as she got so upset when we danced, hugged, jokingly wrestled.
    He said him and his wife would joke and play and his wife would say help help, it was a game to them.
    I don't see it as such a great game. It's annoying and I'm tired of it.
    I spoke with an animal control officer who said his rat terrier does the same with him and his wife. He will jokingly smack his wifes leg to get the game going.

    The other day I moved my hand and was loud in showing my husband someone actions, she though I was serious and came off that sofa in lightning speed barking at us.

    We stop whatever we are doing and reassure her, and include her in the hug or dance, but it is not working.

    Has anyone experienced this problem?
    Did you solve it and if so how?
    Has anyone used an animal behavorial person before?
    This barking and getting all worked up just gets on my nerves.
     
  2. Ardie/WI

    Ardie/WI Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I'm afraid that that behavior is not reversible. My only suggestion is to put the dog in a crate or in another room when you and your DH wrestle.
     

  3. Paula

    Paula Well-Known Member

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    You know that's what everyone says about these dogs till they lose it and attack someone. Then they say "I don't understand, it was such a sweet dog."

    I'd be very careful getting this dog worked up, she may be sweet and never cause a problem, but the breed in general is just unstable. Unstable + inability to feel pain = potential killer.

    Let the flaming begin :)
     
  4. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    Well it's not the wrestling cause that is kind of an occational quick spontanious thing, like the other day we were watering animal and commenced to spray each other with the hose. And the screetching and running away from the cold water. One doesn't think you put the dog up.

    The most annoying thing is just a simple hug good bye makes her think we are hurting each other. I do put her in the other room when we are hugging good bye. I can just clobber my son for making this a game with him and his wife.

    I was wondering if is was a pit bull thing, being unhappy when they think people are fighting but the animal control officer said his little dog does it and I know my in laws Chiahaha's (can't spell it but those taco bell dogs) if you fake making believe you're going to hit someone they go nuts.

    I have heard so many differences of opinions on this breed. And yes they are ones you don't want to allow to get worked up and play rough with.
    Just for this reason I don't tak her in public or off the property.
    When my 2 y/o granddaughter is here I either contain the dog to a bedroom with the door closed or crate the dog.
    Common sense says 27 lb little girl with 55 lbs playfull tank dog, I let her out only when my granddaughter is napping in the room with the door closed.
    I trust my dog but I feel she could inflict injury without meaning it. Just her size and playfulness alone.

    hmmmm, this behavior is quite annoying. The other day hubby came up behind me while doing dishes and just started dancing with me as a song came on, she thought we were hurting each other.

    I think I will consult an animal behavorist, I was hoping someone on here could tell me if they had any experiences with a behaviorist.
    Good thing my son decided to leave her with me permanatly, my 1 y/o grandson may of gotten hurt. My son trusts this dog way to much.
     
  5. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Maybe if you didn't reward her everytime she exhibits this behavior she would have stopped it.

    The two of you play, the dog rushes in and barks, acts upset, and you soothe her. You have rewarded her for rushing in and acting upset.

    Since she is otherwise a well behaved dog, try getting playful, and when she comes toward you, tell her to sit, but don't pull away from your spouse. Praise. Go back to being silly. When she reacts, tell her to sit, or if she is still sitting, down. Praise. Teach her what she should do, to replace the behavior you don't want. You could use a silly trick she knows instead of the sit or down.
     
  6. Mama C

    Mama C Well-Known Member

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    Sorry Grandma, but the dog has to go!
    One day the 2yr old is going to wake up from her nap and open that safley closed door while you are loading the washing machine. The sweet napping dog is going to be startled by this "new person" suddenly in your home (even though she knows the person) and then you are going to wish you took all the warning signs very seriously. A protective dog is my favorite, but they have the potential to be dangerous. I know how attached you get to a dog that protects you, its like a special bond. As a Mom and Grandmom, the dog bond has to come second. This is not a Pit Bull dig, we all know that many breeds have maimed or killed in the past. But if you ever watch a Pit Bull attack, you will see that you cant stop it.
    Sorry. :shrug:
     
  7. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    When your granddaughter comes over, put the crate in the living room and put the dog in the crate. Give your gd kibble and little tiny treats to drop into the crate. Let her drop a few goodies in, then distract her with something else, then let her drop more goodies in. Good things happen when toddler visits.

    Does your dog know she must sit when she meets someone? she needs to sit nicely for a pet. If she will do this, then she can learn to do it with gd.

    Toddlers love to chase and be chases. Teach your dog the chase game. She picks up an object, you give the cue (I'm gonna get you, or some such thing) and happily chase the dog. When she is solid with this game, she can play it with the toddler. This way, the toddler is chasing the dog instead of the dog chasing the child, and the dog's mouth is occupied with the toy.
     
  8. jeannie242

    jeannie242 Well-Known Member

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    I have seen a pit bull attack once and it was horrible, the only thing that FINALLY stopped the attack was a man put a lighter up under its chin.
    The Cocker Spaniel it attacked was lucky to live and ended up with a operation costing $800 and that was over 20 years ago.
    This dog was a neighbors that happened to get outside when its owner came in, and ran across the yard to attack the cocker who was simply out to take a leak in his own yard.
    BUT on the other hand....My neighbor now has a pit bull and sit down for this one~ they also have a Duck, and they were raised together and both are about 4 years old. They are best friends and if I had not seen it I would have never believed it.
    The duck rides around on its back and the pit bull protects it like a child. The duck has a plastic wading pool to play in and the pit bull gets right in with it.
    It is unreal to see them cuddle up to sleep.
    Sure one day it could snap I guess, but I have known other breeds that have done the same thing.
    So maybe its the way they are raised and bred. I have no clue, but that pit bull is so rowdy unless the duck is present and then it turns into a protective loving gentle soul. Its something to see!! Jeannie
     
  9. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    Boy! This is an emotional thing and tough for you I know. However I can tell you that if you are true to really wanting to change this behavior it can be done. AND yes, I have been to a Dog Behaviorist for a homicidal dog and she is now the sweetest thing you ever saw! You CAN change patterns but I believe that as this is a potentially dangerous situation that professional help is needed. Don't wait! Most people put this off way too long.

    No one here is right there with you to read all of the nuances of what is happening although there have been some very good suggestions.

    Here is the website of The Well mannered Dog.

    http://www.humanedogtraining.com/

    I hope that Debbie can refer you to someone in your area that can help you. Most people leave professional help until way too late. The sooner the better.

    There is a national organization for these trainers and they work very hard to keep up with all of the latest information an techniques. They give symposiums and work very hard to learn how to help US help our dogs.

    I had to take Savannah, my homicidal cattle dog, to several weeks of classes with Debbie last year. It was a 100 mile drive every week with "homework" in between but it was worth it. I now have a gentle nice dog who doesn't try and kill every other dog around. She was just terrible when I got her, almost pulling my arms out of the sockets trying to get to other dogs. Regular obedience classes did not help....Savannah couldn't concentrate enough to get any benefit out of them at all. She even tried to "KILL" the plastic St Bernard at Petsmart! :stars:

    Now when we see another dog coming Savannah just looks at me for a treat and all is well. she has learned a lot of cute tricks, is gentle and not jealous with other people and dogs now and travels like a dream.

    Good luck with your Grand dog! Let us know how things go please.

    LQ
     
  10. Caelma

    Caelma Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all for your replies.

    Mama C had a very good point.
    However I can't just dump the dog.
    Dogs in need ot training and lazy folks are the reason
    the shelters are brusting at the seams. JMO
    Anyway whenever the granddaughter is here she will be crated from now on.
    Mama C is right, my granddaughter can open the door.

    Maura you made an excellent point.
    We have started making her lay and stay.
    Then we go back to hugging. Each time she is lasting longer and longer.
    I mean this was getting so rediculous as it was happening everytime we hugged good bye.
    As to the granddaughter giving kibble and treats I am so glad you mentioned this as my son was worried the dog would resent the grandbaby for having to go in a crate or another room everytime she comes over.
    I hold my granddaughter and taught the granddaughter to give commands, like sit and speak and then she claps when Niki does it and givs her a treat. Dog is given kennel up command and back in the crate before granddaughter is put down. The granddaughter has been raised with critters so doesn't chase she sits down and calls the critters to her. It's so cute.
    And no she does not sit when a person comes here, she runs to them cause she things EVERYONE is her friend. So I started with the SIT and STAY.
    She already knew this when I threw a stick. She waits for the GET IT command. When I read your advice I thought if she can do this with a stick she can do it with people it was my fault for not enforcing it.
    No more soothing, she is getting a harsh verbal NO and then we make her
    lay down and give her the STAY command.

    Little Quaker I'll email the person you recommended and see if she knows anyone in my area, I'm just north of you.

    I can just POUND my son for making this a game.
    She is so smart, well behaved other than this issues.
    She is so wonderful with cats and even rabbits.
    We had one get lose and she tried to play with it, all it took was one NO and
    she stopped. She is great with most other dogs.
    However I have heard pits can turn as they get older so I will
    be evaluating her as she gets older.
    She will need to be put down if she starts to show
    aggressive behavior. I won't put her in a pound or adopt her to someone else
    who could get hurt.
    Thank you all for the advice, many good points.
     
  11. Little Quacker in OR

    Little Quacker in OR Well-Known Member

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    I would like to applaud you for taking this common sense approach. Rather than shoving the problem onto someone else you will handle it the best you can, or if there is danger to someone, put the dog down. If more people did this there'd be fewer bad news dogs out there.

    Good luck with her I sure hope all goes well for you. I hope you will let us know.

    LQ