beef hearts for cat food

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by Deb&Al, Jan 30, 2005.

  1. Deb&Al

    Deb&Al Well-Known Member

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    hi

    my mom went to Giant yesterday and stopped by my house to give me a bag of beef heats. yes, beef hearts. i hardly ever go to the grocery store myself, so she thought these were a good deal. they are about as long as a quart jar, but about twice the size around.

    i put them in the freezer, except for one, which i simmered for a couple of hours and then i sliced it real thin and put it in a tin tray with some of the liquid. i gave it to my barn cats and man oh man did they go for it.

    these were not from organically managed cows, so i wouldn't eat them, but they smelled good. :)

    has anybody eaten these? if you were to have the organic ones, would you eat them? i wouldn't eat kidneys or liver from non-organic animals because that's where all the toxins are filtered through and i figure that stuff is still in the organ meat. but if an animal is raised organically, would you eat them?

    thanks.

    debbie
     
  2. R.

    R. Well-Known Member

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    Of course, I would eat them. I would also share them with my cats and dogs, but raw, not cooked for them.
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    I have eaten beef heart and it's good. The consistency is a bit chewy.

    I used to buy beef heart to grind with liver and cook it with rice to add to the dog food kibbles. The dogs did well on this. I miss not being able to find fresh beef heart now. :(
     
  4. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    Don't know if I would eat beef hearts. Somehow not high on my menu.

    My former neighbor had it as part of the regular diet for her cats and so did her sister. The sister DH had as one of his main jobs to cut up the meat raw with scissors, was a big deal. Cats apparently loved the stuff. Also got real tuna and chicken parts. The weird one they seemed to love was cantaloupe.

    Mouse and squirrel parts where never fully eaten. They only ripped the livers out of those.
     
  5. Deb&Al

    Deb&Al Well-Known Member

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    thanks,

    i'm going to find one of my old,old cookbooks. i know that in the old days they used every part of the animal.

    last fall, some friends of ours that had raised a couple hundred pastured chickens and turkeys had all the necks, and livers and hearts in 20 lb bags that they were selling for five dollars. i bought all they had and bagged them up in smaller portions and put them in the freezer for the barn cats.

    it saves on the feed bill to supplement their kitty kibble.
    debbie
     
  6. fordson major

    fordson major construction and Garden b Supporter

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    necks make great soup stock and the hearts realy good eating! livers cooked up make an awsome spagetti sauce.the material filter through the liver and kidneys is expeled in the urine. beef hearts are very good boiled and sliced thin . full of vitamins .totaly organic way of getting them . if its good enough for cats good enough for humans,i never serve nothing to a cat i would not eat myself(what they catch or find is a diferent story)
     
  7. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    Heart is tough...it's a hard working muscle!

    Mom used to cook them by stuffing and then a long slow bake. Really good that way, and the long cooking helps tenderize it. I haven't had any but from the cows we raised when I was a kid. I guess I'll have to wait until we can raise a beef to have it again.

    Meg
     
  8. farmy

    farmy Well-Known Member

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    The heart is always the first thing we eat after we slaughter. It's just a big hunk of muscle meat, and very tasty. I slice it thin and pan fry it with onions, or braise the slices in a little stock and good red wine. Love it.
     
  9. tinknal

    tinknal Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Stuff it with seasonings and boil it in a pickle brine, makes excellent sandwich meat.
     
  10. Cosmic

    Cosmic Well-Known Member

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    Them barn cats are eating good in the neighborhood. :p

    Chicken / turkey livers can be made into many dishes. Excellent as the base for a gibbet gravy, many sauces. Fried with onions and so many more. Local markets sell it in small containers for about a $1.
     
  11. bigrandy

    bigrandy Member

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    slice it thin and put in a low oven in bbq sauce for a few hours
     
  12. bonnie in indiana

    bonnie in indiana Well-Known Member

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    You all don't know what you are missing.
    I am a picky eater and the below are 2 of my favorites.

    BEEF HEART
    Cut the heart into pieces and cut off all the icky looking veins and gross looking stuff.

    Put it in the crock pot and cook all day or all nite.

    It is the greatest meat ever for BEEF AND NOODLES.

    Since it is a muscle taht works all the time you need to cook it for a long time.


    Do the same with Beef tounge------GERAT for slicing and putting on sandwiches. :D
     
  13. gilberte

    gilberte Well-Known Member Supporter

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    Anybody know how to get drool out of a keyboard :confused:
     
  14. tallpines

    tallpines Well-Known Member

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    A favorite at our house!

    I cut the washed heart into 3 or 4 chucks and simmer it with S&P and onion for 3-4 hours........
    Then cut it up into cubes---eliminating the sinuous parts.

    I make a strogenouff sauce----add the cubed heart pieces and serve it over egg noodles.

    The meat is high in cholesterol so don't eat it too often.
    Simmering it releases a lot of that thick fat from the muscle before it is consumed.
     
  15. Maura

    Maura Well-Known Member Supporter

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    I cook heart in the oven in a covered pan. Toss in some potatoes and carrots and it's dinner. It also takes well to rosemary on top.

    When I feed heart to the dog, it is uncooked. Cooking destroys enzymes which dogs need to digest the meat.

    What you are buying from the store is a fairly young steer. As long as it was healthy, the organs are free of toxins, at least as much as the rest of the animal's meat.
     
  16. Don Armstrong

    Don Armstrong In Remembrance

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    Beef heart is delicious. Any heart muscle is the same taste but more concentrated than ordinary muscle, so it does do well as stew, casserole or minced (ground). To my taste the meat isn't tough, but the sinews that tie the heart's vales down ARE tough. You want to get rid of them. Most are at the top and cutting an inch or two slice off the top for petfood will get rid of most ot the sinews and valves and fat, leaving the best and biggest part for the people who'll appreciate it. Incidentally, you can stuff the rest of the heart, moist roast, then serve by slicing across.

    I used to mince a lot of it. SInce it was very lean I could just spread it on something like a cookie tray and cook then dry in a slow oven. The dried grains of meat would keep for months. I have no reason to think they wouldn't have kept for years, except that we'd always use it, or the boys would find where it was hidden and eat it as a snack food.

    As someone said, though, it is higher in cholesterol than ordinary muscle meats. Any of the organ meats are, although heart, kidney, liver, pancreas are not so much so as to be frightening - just enough so they're something to be aware of.
     
  17. FolioMark

    FolioMark In Remembrance

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    Beef heart was one of the joys of my youth. My Pepere was a butcher and used to bring them home. He cooked them sliced thin and sauted real quick or cooked in bbq sauce on bread. But the best way was stuffed with bread crumbs and herbs and slow roasted with celery, onions and root veggies and served with gravy. Its great in stir fries too. Unfortunately these days, you cant buy a whole heart in the grocery store so I cant stuff one. Just pieces now and they arent cheap. In the old days you couldnt give them away, which is why Pepere used to bring them home to us. :haha:
     
  18. Deb&Al

    Deb&Al Well-Known Member

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    next time i thaw one of them out, WE'RE eating it. ;)

    debbie
     
  19. Meg Z

    Meg Z winding down

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    I was amazed at the comments about the cholesterol level of beef heart. Since it's a lean muscle, I wouldn't have guessed it to be higher in cholesterol than other muscles. It is, though! Not nearly as high as non-muscular organs, but definitely higher than regular steaks and such. Here's a site I found listing all types of food....
    http://www.gettingwell.com/content/nutrition_health/chapters/appendices/calorie.shtml

    Pretty interesting stuff
    Meg
     
  20. Hank - Narita

    Hank - Narita Well-Known Member

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    We used to buy hearts for our cats and fed it to them raw. We have never eaten them ourselves. They used to be cheap to buy. Our cats now prefer Walmart food; don't know how healthy it is for them but they look well.