Beavers Wanted (I think)

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by East Texas Pine Rooter, Nov 26, 2003.

  1. East Texas Pine Rooter

    East Texas Pine Rooter Well-Known Member

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    :dance: I have lots of good underground water springs that come to the surface on my farm, running year round. They all come together on the lower corner of my property, where there is plenty of trees, and youpon brush. Pools that have formed from fallen trees, restricting the flow of water leaving my property, have caused small water falls, with the noise of rushing water. I have thought about hireing a dozer to come build a pond, but it would destroy so much of the timber. Then I thought about getting a couple of pair of beavers, they couldn't resist the natural water falls, and I would have deeper ponds, for fishing, and duck hunting. QUESTION: How do you contact a beaver trapper to get the beavers?
     
  2. I have thought about hiring a dozer to come build a pond, but it would destroy so much
    of the timber.

    Destroyed by dozer or beaver, what's the difference. That is just what beaver will do too.
     

  3. ed/IL

    ed/IL Well-Known Member

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    A dozer would probably sink, might even divert your springs. Beavers would not help. Get a shovel and hand dig. Maybe dig small pond close by with back hoe and divert or pump the water over to fill it
     
  4. flutemandolin

    flutemandolin mark an eight, dude!

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    How's the beaver population around there? If they are abundant they will eventually find your place on their own. Of course you'll have to put up with losing some trees to them. If you want a pond deep enough for fishing, though, you may have to have a backhoe come in. Your local conty extension or NRCS office might have info on pond building; however if you get them involved they'll be making sure you follow all of the wetland rules and they might not let you do what you want.
     
  5. bgak47

    bgak47 Well-Known Member

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    If it was me, I'd keep quiet about all of this aubundance of of springs & waterfalls. You're very lucky to have this on your property, & I would NEVER advertise it. I would also not try to change it.
     
  6. Oxankle

    Oxankle Well-Known Member

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    Rooter;

    If you have any trees in that area that you care about you had better put woven wire guards around them before you import beaver. They are about as destructive as a pack of rats in a roomful of sacked feed. They will build dams, and the resulting waterways look nice but they may be very shallow as the Beaver will not build a dam any higher than needed to get them where they want to go. They will cut down trees and leave sharp pointed stumps sticking up. If a tree is small enough that a beaver can cut it in one or two bites the resulting stake is sharp enough to hurt you if you stumble upon it.

    Remember that beaver breed and multiply. When beaver reach maturity the old beaver will drive off the young males, biting chunks out of their tails if they are too slow leaving. As a result, the young males disperse, looking for new trees to cut and new dam sites to occupy. If it bercomes known that you imported beaver into an area your neighbors may resent it.

    All that said, if I had a place where they would do no harm I'd sure keep some on the place. I have some now, but they have to go. This happens about every two years. I trap them out, break down the dams, new ones show up. This time they have cut about an acre of cherry, hackberry, sycamore--They have a hierarchy of taste preferences, oak is down the line so I managed to save the oaks by putting wire netting around them. They have just about killed out all the decent ash trees I had. One year a dam will be here, the next batch of beaver will put a dam somewhere else. This time they built first in thick brush along a creek and I did not even know they were there until the dam backed water up over the cattle crossings. When I went hunting them I found one dam about three feet high and anothere already about 4 feet high.
    These are creek dams in a deep ravine where a dam 20 feet long can back up the whole creek .
     
  7. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    They will flood your land and remove all trees within about 500 feet of the water. They will make a mess of all standing trees. No a good idea.

    [​IMG]
    Bigger Than 5 Acres They Were Extending This Pond Into The Field The Would Have Flooded about 20 to 40 acres of field.

    [​IMG]
    Big Mess Every Where

    [​IMG]
    Cut Big Trees No Problem

    Do you want that? The Beavers are gone from our land, we had the driest year in 45 years - they left on their own - good. We cleared the land near the creek, and turned it and their old ponds into field. Don't want to see any Beavers on our land or our neighbours.

    Alex
     
  8. SteveD(TX)

    SteveD(TX) Well-Known Member

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    Speaking of beavers in East Texas....last Sunday, from our boat dock we saw a beaver swimming around in circles about 20 ft. from shore in our heavily wooded cove at Lake Athens. Thinking that this was odd behavior, we finally spotted a big white dog that was watching him from the bank. Seems that ol' beaver was harassing that dog. After a minute or so, that dog jumped as long and hard into the water towards that beaver. The beaver swung around and slapped his tail in the water right in front of the dog's face. Talk about funny. That dog didn't know which way was up for about a minute. :D

    Our place is HEAVILY wooded all around the water, and to our knowledge we've only lost two small trees near the shoreline in the last three years. They built a dam years ago at the water's edge where a spring feeds into the lake, creating a small pond. The deer love to play in that little pond and they're funny to watch. We love our beavers, but if they get one of my pretty maples by the water they will be gone (don't tell the wife).
     
  9. OzarksJohn

    OzarksJohn Guest

    I would be very careful about what you wish for if it involves rodents of any kind, whether they be aquatic or drylanders! :D
    I have lived in beaver country before and have seen the damage those little boogers can do. If you end up hiring and paying for an ADC trapper to cure a future problem they loose the cute furry useful critter consideration right quick. They also are notorious for carrying and spreading giardia which ends up contaminating the water and likely the digestive tract of most other critters that drink from the source. Had some friends that caught "beaver fever" from their home water source, (natural spring) most likely from either the deer or elk carrying it from the lower creek where beaver were present up the side of the mountain to their spring that they had tapped by pipeline down to the house. It's Montezuma's revenge Rocky Mountain style and requires medical attention to cure. Go careful withe beaver idea.
    OzarksJohn
     
  10. OzarksJohn

    OzarksJohn Guest

    I also forgot to mention that if you ever need to remove a well established beaver dam from a stream, be prepared to bring in heavy equipment or an explosives expert :eek: and pay the piper for their services. The blaster will usually be cheaper and leave no equipment tracks if you can find one. Or maybe pray for a huge flood and hope mother nature can remove the problem for you. These aren't amature builders/engineers by any stretch! :D
    OzarksJohn
     
  11. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    OzarksJohn,

    Right-on!

    I broke their main dam (they had three main dams on one-half mile of creek, with up to three "check" or down-stream dams at each main dam) four times myself with loader - spent hours. Yes, I figured out how they did it. But What took me two to three hours to do with the loader (I was only working on their main dam), they built back overnight!

    Next I lowered their pond water level and installed a "Pond Leveller" in an attempt to "Live-With-Them". That didn't work, they figured it out and blocked it.

    [​IMG]
    I Even Constructed A "Level Control Pipe System" to let them stay, yet not flood our field - didn't work - they figured it out.

    Then we hired a bigger back-hoe three times, within a week - back again!

    Next a huge tracked back-hoe was working on the neighbours Quarter Section, he came over and dug two huge creek - alternatives, we paid "big bucks" for this big "hoe". Then their main pond dried, because of the digging and the driest years - as mentioned above.

    Then we paid for a D-7 cat to clear both sides of the creek, remove four other now unused houses, and about six secondary house, and lots of "runs". The cat then cleared and "broke" the surrounding land with a breaking plow, and/or breaking disc, and ditched the creek.

    Sure we got some good land from their fertile 5 to 10 acre main pond. And we got rid of some bad looking dead trees (that about three years ago where huge beautiful poplar trees - that they killed and made look like swamp land - which is what our whole Quarter was heading for).

    They are gone - only due to the dry weather. If we hadn't taken the trees - poplar and willow away - they would come back when the water came back next year.

    [​IMG]

    Beaver Pond Now, Cleared, Piled, Ready for Burning!

    [​IMG]

    Nice Ditch-Creek (Which Has Not Dried In 45 Years - Until This Year) , We Will Farm Right Up To The Ditch-Creek No Beavers!

    Alex