Beaver Ponds

Discussion in 'Homesteading Questions' started by moonwolf, Dec 11, 2004.

  1. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Canada
    There are natural beaver ponds on the property. Other than the trees downed by the beavers which could be utilized for firewood, and the water for possible garden irrigation, and baitfish that are in there, I though some of you folks would come up with some interesting suggestions about their use on the homestead. In this particular case, we're talking about being a good distance from the gardens or buildings. To pump it also is uphill grade at least a distance of several hundreds of yards. Water quality is also a concern considering Giardia that beavers naturally carry as a parasite that can infect the water for some drinking animals like dogs. Don't know how that affects other livestock. Without dwelling on using the water for drinking, what other natural or utilizing purpose can beaver ponds and surrounding areas be of interest?
    I can say I've seen everything there from Pelicans to wood ducks, otters, wild geese, and the wetland attracts all variety of wildlife like cranes, deer... U name it. Plants grow there like alder and god knows what sort of aquatic vegitation. Well, it's a beaver pond...well, actually a series of them which vary in water levels from flooding one year to the dam busting and water flowing out. Beavers, what they are will be busy and rebuild.
     
  2. Alex

    Alex Well-Known Member

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    Vancouver, and Moberly Lake, BC, Canada
    After we spent thousands on backhoes, and cats they finally left.

    They were starting to flood our fields - that we worked so hard on - and spent so much money getting in good "worked", and planted condition. They had five dams in one-half mile.

    We tried "levelers", I broke their dams many times - took me half a day with a loader for one - they worked all night "like Beavers" and rebuilt it overnight, and we tried anything except killing - we do not want to kill them. There were a lot of suggestions, some from here (this forum) about, lead poisoning, and a very funny beaver stew recipe.

    In the end we cleared the half mile of creek about 500 feet on each side.

    They left on their own. Have not been back for two years so far.

    They can be a big problem, or if you don't need the land and it is steep, then having them around could just be messy.

    Alex

    [​IMG]
    Look At The Size Of The Trees They WERE Knocking Down

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    Lots Of Chewing There, And They Only Use The Little Branches And Leave A Big Mess - Bad Animals, Very Bad, Not Very Nice, Eh?

    [​IMG]
    Blocked Up And enlarged Creek With Beaver House At End

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    This Is The Creek Looking West After Ditching And Tree Removal - It was The Dryest Year in Forty Years - No Water In Creek For A Few Weeks - No Trees For Five Hundred Feet Either Side Of Creek Fall.

    [​IMG]
    About The Same Spot This Summer Looking East July No Beavers, It Is Running, First Time Barley (Not Flooded)

    Good Luck, Hope It Works, Either Way For you,

    Alex
     

  3. moonwolf

    moonwolf Well-Known Member

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    Alex, I wasn't thinking to clear the beaver pond areas. It would be a constant battle. It's an area removed down the and too costly to clear for the few acres, though it would be fertile.
    Oh, I know the beavers can down big trees. I'm sure there is several dozen layed mature poplar along one bank. One thing about that is some savings on chain saw fuel. :D I would want the ponds there as they are, but in this mixed agriculture zone makes interesting diversity. I'm not into trapping, and the big pond that drained from a flood several years ago is a struggle for the critters rebuilding so that abandoned area is almost a meadow. The spring attracts such a variety of bird life and wildlife, I think perhaps some photography may be the best 'land use' for the time being. I had some suggestions for taking photos to make into calendars or something perhaps less mundain to farmsteading.
    thanks for sharing your ideas.
     
  4. Bruce in NE

    Bruce in NE Well-Known Member

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    Dec 11, 2002
    You have to remember that beavers come and go. We had several dams along the creek for a couple years. They felled some big cottonwoods but mostly cedars to make their dams. Then they just left after a few years. Thank goodness. Don't expect your beaver ponds to be permanent.